Minister of Foreign Affairs (Democratic Republic of the Congo)

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Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (known as the Republic of the Congo in 1960–71 and the Republic of Zaire in 1971–97) is a government minister in charge of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, responsible for conducting foreign relations of the country.

Contents

The following is a list of foreign ministers of the Democratic Republic of the Congo since its founding in 1960: [1]

No.Name
(Birth–Death)
PortraitTenure
Republic of the Congo (1960–1971)
1 Justin Marie Bomboko
(1928–2014)
Aankomst op Schiphol van Justin Bomboko minister in reg Ileo op doorreis naar P, Bestanddeelnr 911-6367.jpg 1960–1963
2 Auguste Mabika-Kalanda
(1932–1995)
No image.png 1963
3 Cyrille Adoula
(1921–1978)
Cyrille Adoula 1963.jpg 1963–1964
4 Moïse Tshombe
(1919–1969)
26.2.63. Moise Tshombe arrive a Toulouse (1963) - 53Fi5440 (cropped).jpg 1964–1965
Thomas Kanza
(1934–2004) [lower-alpha 1]
Thomas Kanza.jpg 1964–1965
5 Cléophas Kamitatu
(1931–2008)
Cleophas Kamitatu, president de la province de Leopoldville, en 1960 (cropped).jpg 1965
(1) Justin Marie Bomboko
(1928–2014)
Aankomst op Schiphol van Justin Bomboko minister in reg Ileo op doorreis naar P, Bestanddeelnr 911-6367.jpg 1965–1969
(3) Cyrille Adoula
(1921–1978)
Cyrille Adoula 1963.jpg 1969–1970
6 Mario-Philippe Losembe
(b. 1933)
Cardoso Mario.jpg 1970–1971
Republic of Zaire (1971–1997)
(6)Losembe Batwanyele
(b. 1933) [lower-alpha 2]
Cardoso Mario.jpg 1971–1972
7 Jean Nguza Karl-i-Bond
(1938–2003)
Jean Nguza Karl-i-Bond (cropped).jpg 1972–1974
8 Umba di Lutete
(b. 1939)
No image.png 1974–1975
9 Mandungu Bula Nyati
(1935–2000)
No image.png 1975–1976
(7) Jean Nguza Karl-i-Bond
(1938–2003)
Jean Nguza Karl-i-Bond (cropped).jpg 1976–1977
(8) Umba di Lutete
(b. 1939)
No image.png 1977–1979
(7) Jean Nguza Karl-i-Bond
(1938–2003)
Jean Nguza Karl-i-Bond (cropped).jpg 1979–1980
10 Inonga Lokongo L'Ome
(1939–1991)
No image.png 1980–1981
(1)Bomboko Lokumba
(1928–2014) [lower-alpha 3]
Aankomst op Schiphol van Justin Bomboko minister in reg Ileo op doorreis naar P, Bestanddeelnr 911-6367.jpg 1981
11 Yoka Mangono
(1939–1995)
No image.png 1981–1982
12 Gérard Kamanda wa Kamanda
(1940–2016)
G Kamanda.JPG 1982–1983
(8) Umba di Lutete
(b. 1939)
No image.png 1983–1985
13 Edouard Mokolo wa Mpombo
(b. 1944)
No image.png 1985–1986
(9) Mandungu Bula Nyati
(1935–2000)
No image.png 1986
14 Léon Kengo wa Dondo
(b. 1935)
Leon Kengo Senate of Poland 01.JPG 1986–1987
15 Ekila Liyonda
(1948–2006)
No image.png 1987–1988
(7) Jean Nguza Karl-i-Bond
(1938–2003)
Jean Nguza Karl-i-Bond (cropped).jpg 1988–1990
16 Mushobekwa Kalimba wa Katana
(1943–2004)
No image.png 1990–1991
(10) Inonga Lokongo L'Ome
(1939–1991)
No image.png 1991
17 Ipoto Eyebu Bakand'Asi
(b. 1933)
No image.png 1991
18 Buketi Bukayi No image.png 1991
19 Bagbeni Adeito Nzengeya
(b. 1941)
No image.png 1991–1992
20 Pierre Lumbi
(1950–2020)
No image.png 1992–1993
21 Mpinga Kasenda
(1937–1994)
No image.png 1993–1994
22 Lunda Bululu
(b. 1942)
No image.png 1994–1995
(12) Gérard Kamanda wa Kamanda
(1940–2016)
G Kamanda.JPG 1995–1996
23 Jean-Marie Kititwa
(1929–2000)
No image.png 1996
(12) Gérard Kamanda wa Kamanda
(1940–2016)
G Kamanda.JPG 1996–1997
Democratic Republic of the Congo (1997–present)
24 Bizima Karaha
(b. 1968)
No image.png 1997–1998
25 Jean-Charles Okoto
(b. 1955)
No image.png 1998–1999
26 Abdoulaye Yerodia Ndombasi
(1933–2019)
No image.png 1999–2000
27 Léonard She Okitundu
(b. 1946)
Leonard She Okitundu - June 2017 (cropped).jpg 2000–2003
28 Antoine Ghonda
(b. 1965)
No image.png 2003–2004
29 Raymond Ramazani Baya
(1943–2019)
Raymond Ramazani Baya - 2010 (cropped).jpg 2004–2007
30 Antipas Mbusa
(b. 1959)
Antipas Mbusa - 2008 (cropped).jpg 2007–2008
31 Alexis Thambwe Mwamba
(b. 1943)
Henry Bellingham met with the DRC Foreign Minister Mr Alexis Thambwe-Mwambe (5117871788) (cropped).jpg 2008–2012
32 Raymond Tshibanda
(b. 1950)
Raymond Tshibanda.jpg 2012–2016
(27) Léonard She Okitundu
(b. 1946)
Leonard She Okitundu - June 2017 (cropped).jpg 2016–2019
Alexis Thambwe Mwamba
(b. 1943)
Acting Minister
Henry Bellingham met with the DRC Foreign Minister Mr Alexis Thambwe-Mwambe (5117871788) (cropped).jpg 2019
Franck Mwe di Malila
(b. 1968)
Acting Minister
Franck Mwe di Malila (cropped).jpg 2019
33 Marie Tumba Nzeza
(b. 1950)
No image.png 2019–present

Notes

  1. Rebel government at Stanleyville, during the Congo Crisis.
  2. Previously named Mario-Philippe Losembe; changed name in 1972 due to the policy of Zairianisation.
  3. Previously named Justin Marie Bomboko; changed name due to the policy of Zairianisation.

See also

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References

  1. "Foreign ministers A–D". rulers.org. B. Schemmel. Retrieved 12 January 2019.