Minister of Justice (Iceland)

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The Minister of Justice in Iceland is the head of the Ministry of Justice and forms a part of the Cabinet of Iceland. The ministry was formed in 2017 and the current minister is Sigríður Á. Andersen.

Cabinet of Iceland

The Cabinet of Iceland is the collective decision-making body of the government of Iceland, composed of the Prime Minister and the cabinet ministers.

Sigríður Á. Andersen Icelandic politician

Sigríður Ásthildur Andersen is an Icelandic politician and lawyer who served as the Minister of Justice of Iceland from 2017–2019. She resigned as minister of justice after the European Court of Human Rights found her appointments of judges to the Icelandic court of appeals to be illegal.

Contents

History

The Minister of Justice and Ecclesiastical Affairs was the head of Ministry of Justice and Ecclesiastical Affairs, which existed between 1 January 1970 and 1 October 2009. Before the Cabinet of Iceland Act no. 73/1969 took effect, ministries in Iceland had not existed separately from the ministers. [1] Between 4 January 1917 and 1 January 1970, the minister responsible for justice was titled Minister of Justice and the minister responsible for ecclesiastical affairs was titled Minister of Ecclesiastical Affairs. In cases where one person was responsible for both, he or she was titled Minister of Justice and Ecclesiastical Affairs. On 1 October 2009, the position became Minister of Justice and Human Rights (Icelandic : Dómsmála- og mannréttindaráðherra) and the ministry itself was renamed accordingly. On 31 December 2010, the Ministry of Justice and Human Rights was merged with the Ministry of Transport, Communications and Local Government to form the Ministry of the Interior. On 1 May 2017 the Ministry of the Interor was again split up into the Ministry of Justice and the Ministry of Transport and Local Government.

Justice Concept of moral fairness and administration of the law

Justice, in its broadest context, includes both the attainment of that which is just and the philosophical discussion of that which is just. The concept of justice is based on numerous fields, and many differing viewpoints and perspectives including the concepts of moral correctness based on ethics, rationality, law, religion, equity and fairness. Often, the general discussion of justice is divided into the realm of social justice as found in philosophy, theology and religion, and, procedural justice as found in the study and application of the law.

State religion religious body or creed officially endorsed by the state

A state religion is a religious body or creed officially endorsed by the state. A state with an official religion, while not secular, is not necessarily a theocracy, a country whose rulers have both secular and spiritual authority. State religions are official or government-sanctioned establishments of a religion, but the state does not need be under the control of the religion nor is the state-sanctioned religion necessarily under the control of the state.

Icelandic language North Germanic language mainly spoken in Iceland

Icelandic is a North Germanic language spoken in Iceland. Along with Faroese, Norn, and Western Norwegian it formerly constituted West Nordic; while Danish, Eastern Norwegian and Swedish constituted East Nordic. Modern Norwegian Bokmål is influenced by both groups, leading the Nordic languages to be divided into mainland Scandinavian languages and Insular Nordic. Historically, it was the westernmost of the Indo-European languages until the Portuguese settlement in the Azores.

List of ministers

Minister of Justice (4 January 1917 – 1 January 1970)

MinisterTook officeLeft officeDurationPartyCabinet
1 1x1 placeholder.png Jón Magnússon
(1859–1926)
4 January 19177 March 19225 years, 2 months, 3 days
(1,888 days)
2 Sigurdur Eggerz.jpg Sigurður Eggerz
(1875–1945)
7 March 192222 March 19242 years, 15 days
(746 days)
(1) 1x1 placeholder.png Jón Magnússon
(1859–1926)
22 March 192423 June 19262 years, 3 months, 1 day
(823 days)
3 1x1 placeholder.png Magnús Guðmundsson
(1879–1937)
23 June 192628 August 19271 year, 2 months, 5 days
(431 days)
4 1x1 placeholder.png Jónas Jónsson
(1885–1968)
28 August 192720 April 19313 years, 7 months, 23 days
(1,331 days)
5 1x1 placeholder.png Tryggvi Þórhallsson
(1889–1935)
20 April 193120 August 19314 months
(122 days)
(4) 1x1 placeholder.png Jónas Jónsson
(1885–1968)
20 August 19313 June 19329 months, 14 days
(288 days)
(3) 1x1 placeholder.png Magnús Guðmundsson
(1879–1937)
3 June 193214 November 19325 months, 11 days
(164 days)
6 Olafur Thors.jpg Ólafur Thors
(1892–1964)
14 November 193223 December 19321 month, 9 days
(39 days)
IP
(3) 1x1 placeholder.png Magnús Guðmundsson
(1879–1937)
23 December 193228 July 19341 year, 7 months, 5 days
(582 days)
7 Herman Jonasson.jpg Hermann Jónasson
(1896–1976)
28 July 193416 May 19427 years, 9 months, 18 days
(2,849 days)
PP
8 1x1 placeholder.png Jakob Möller
(1880–1955)
16 May 194216 December 19427 months
(214 days)
9 EinarArnorsson.jpg Einar Arnórsson
(1880–1955)
16 December 194221 September 19441 year, 9 months, 5 days
(645 days)
10 1x1 placeholder.png Björn Þórðarson
(1879–1963)
21 September 194421 October 19441 month
(30 days)
independent
11 Finnur Jonsson (early).jpg Finnur Jónsson
(1858–1934)
21 October 19444 February 19472 years, 3 months, 14 days
(836 days)
SDP
12 1x1 placeholder.png Bjarni Benediktsson
(1908–1970)
4 February 194724 July 19569 years, 5 months, 20 days
(3,458 days)
IP
(7) Herman Jonasson.jpg Hermann Jónasson
(1896–1976)
24 July 195623 December 19582 years, 4 months, 29 days
(882 days)
PP
13 1x1 placeholder.png Friðjón Skarphéðinsson
(1909–1996)
23 December 195820 November 195910 months, 28 days
(332 days)
SDP
(12) 1x1 placeholder.png Bjarni Benediktsson
(1908–1970)
20 November 195914 November 19633 years, 11 months, 25 days
(1,455 days)
IP
14 1x1 placeholder.png Jóhann Hafstein
(1915–1980)
14 November 19631 January 19706 years, 1 month, 18 days
(2,240 days)
IP

Minister of Ecclesiastical Affairs (4 January 1917 – 1 January 1970)

MinisterTook officeLeft officeDurationPartyCabinet
1 1x1 placeholder.png Jón Magnússon
(1859–1926)
4 January 19177 March 19225 years, 2 months, 3 days
(1,888 days)
2 Sigurdur Eggerz.jpg Sigurður Eggerz
(1875–1945)
7 March 192222 March 19242 years, 15 days
(746 days)
(1) 1x1 placeholder.png Jón Magnússon
(1859–1926)
22 March 192423 June 19262 years, 3 months, 1 day
(823 days)
3 1x1 placeholder.png Magnús Guðmundsson
(1879–1937)
23 June 192628 August 19271 year, 2 months, 5 days
(431 days)
4 1x1 placeholder.png Jónas Jónsson
(1885–1968)
28 August 192720 April 19313 years, 7 months, 23 days
(1,331 days)
5 1x1 placeholder.png Tryggvi Þórhallsson
(1889–1935)
20 April 193120 August 19314 months
(122 days)
(4) 1x1 placeholder.png Jónas Jónsson
(1885–1968)
20 August 19313 June 19329 months, 14 days
(288 days)
(3) 1x1 placeholder.png Magnús Guðmundsson
(1879–1937)
3 June 193223 June 193220 days
(20 days)
6 1x1 placeholder.png Þorsteinn Briem
(1885–1949)
23 June 193228 July 19342 years, 1 month, 5 days
(765 days)
7 Herman Jonasson.jpg Hermann Jónasson
(1896–1976)
28 July 193416 May 19427 years, 9 months, 18 days
(2,849 days)
PP
8 1x1 placeholder.png Magnús Jónsson
(1887–1958)
16 May 194216 December 19427 months
(214 days)
9 1x1 placeholder.png Björn Þórðarson
(1879–1963)
16 December 194221 October 19441 year, 10 months, 5 days
(675 days)
independent
10 1x1 placeholder.png Emil Jónsson
(1902–1986)
21 October 19444 February 19472 years, 3 months, 14 days
(836 days)
SDP
11 1x1 placeholder.png Eysteinn Jónsson
(1906–1993)
4 February 19476 December 19492 years, 10 months, 2 days
(1,036 days)
PP
12 1x1 placeholder.png Bjarni Benediktsson
(1908–1970)
6 December 194914 March 19503 months, 8 days
(98 days)
IP
(7) Herman Jonasson.jpg Hermann Jónasson
(1896–1976)
14 March 195011 September 19533 years, 5 months, 28 days
(1,277 days)
PP
13 SteingrimurSteinthorsson.jpg Steingrímur Steinþórsson
(1893–1966)
11 September 195324 July 19562 years, 10 months, 13 days
(1,047 days)
PP
(7) Herman Jonasson.jpg Hermann Jónasson
(1896–1976)
24 July 195623 December 19582 years, 4 months, 29 days
(882 days)
PP
14 1x1 placeholder.png Friðjón Skarphéðinsson
(1909–1996)
23 December 195820 November 195910 months, 28 days
(332 days)
SDP
(12) 1x1 placeholder.png Bjarni Benediktsson
(1908–1970)
20 November 195914 September 19611 year, 9 months, 25 days
(664 days)
IP
15 1x1 placeholder.png Jóhann Hafstein
(1915–1980)
14 September 196131 December 19613 months, 17 days
(108 days)
IP
(12) 1x1 placeholder.png Bjarni Benediktsson
(1908–1970)
31 December 196114 November 19631 year, 10 months, 14 days
(683 days)
IP
(15) 1x1 placeholder.png Jóhann Hafstein
(1915–1980)
14 November 19631 January 19706 years, 1 month, 18 days
(2,240 days)
IP

Minister of Justice and Ecclesiastical Affairs (1 January 1970 – 1 October 2009)

MinisterTook officeLeft officeDurationPartyCabinet
1 1x1 placeholder.png Jóhann Hafstein
(1915–1980)
1 January 197010 October 19709 months, 9 days
(282 days)
IP Bjarni Benediktsson
Jóhann Hafstein
2 1x1 placeholder.png Auður Auðuns
(1911–1999)
10 October 197014 July 19719 months, 4 days
(277 days)
IP Jóhann Hafstein
3 1x1 placeholder.png Ólafur Jóhannesson
(1913–1984)
14 July 19711 September 19787 years, 1 month, 18 days
(2,606 days)
PP Ólafur Jóhannesson I
Geir Hallgrímsson
4 1x1 placeholder.png Steingrímur Hermannsson
(1928–2010)
1 September 197815 October 19791 year, 1 month, 14 days
(409 days)
PP Ólafur Jóhannesson II
5 1x1 placeholder.png Vilmundur Gylfason
(1948–1983)
15 October 19798 February 19803 months, 24 days
(116 days)
SDP Benedikt Sigurðsson Gröndal
6 1x1 placeholder.png Friðjón Þórðarson
(1923–2009)
8 February 198026 May 19833 years, 3 months, 18 days
(1,203 days)
IP Gunnar Thoroddsen
7 1x1 placeholder.png Jón Helgason
(1931–2019)
26 May 19838 July 19874 years, 1 month, 12 days
(1,504 days)
PP Steingrímur Hermannsson I
8 1x1 placeholder.png Jón Sigurðsson
(1941–)
8 July 198728 September 19881 year, 2 months, 20 days
(448 days)
SDP Þorsteinn Pálsson
9 Halldór Ásgrímsson
(1947–)
28 September 198810 September 198911 months, 13 days
(347 days)
PP Steingrímur Hermannsson II
10 1x1 placeholder.png Óli Þorbjörn Guðbjartsson
(1935–)
10 September 198930 April 19911 year, 7 months, 20 days
(597 days)
CP Steingrímur Hermannsson III
11 Þorsteinn Pálsson
(1947–)
30 April 199111 May 19998 years, 11 days
(2,933 days)
IP Davíð Oddsson I
Davíð Oddsson II
12 David Oddsson.jpg Davíð Oddsson
(1948–)
11 May 199928 May 199917 days
(17 days)
IP Davíð Oddsson II
13 1x1 placeholder.png Sólveig Guðrún Pétursdóttir
(1952–)
28 May 199923 May 20033 years, 11 months, 25 days
(1,456 days)
IP Davíð Oddsson III
14 Björn Bjarnason
(1944–)
23 May 20031 February 20095 years, 8 months, 9 days
(2,081 days)
IP Davíð Oddsson IV
Halldór Ásgrímsson
Geir Haarde I
Geir Haarde II
15 1x1 placeholder.png Ragna Árnadóttir
(1966–)
1 February 2009 independent Jóhanna Sigurðardóttir I
Jóhanna Sigurðardóttir II

Minister of Justice and Human Rights (1 October 2009 – 31 December 2010)

MinisterTook officeLeft officeDurationPartyCabinet
(15) 1x1 placeholder.png Ragna Árnadóttir
(1966–)
2 September 20101 year, 7 months, 1 day
(578 days)
independent Jóhanna Sigurðardóttir II
16 Ögmundur Jónasson
(1948–)
2 September 201031 December 20103 months, 29 days
(120 days)
LGM Jóhanna Sigurðardóttir II

Minister of the Interior (2011–2017)

See Minister of the Interior (Iceland)

Minister of Justice (2017–)

MinisterTook officeLeft officeDurationPartyCabinet
1 Sigríður Á. Andersen
(1971–)
1 May 2011 IP Katrín Jakobsdóttir

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References

  1. "Frumvarp til laga um Stjórnarráð Íslands" [Bill regarding the Cabinet of Iceland.](PDF). Legal Code (in Icelandic). Parliament of Iceland . Retrieved 13 November 2012.