Ministry of the Treasury

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Premodern Japan
Imperial Seal of Japan.svg
Part of a series on the politics and
government of Japan during the
Nara and Heian periods
Daijō-daijin
Minister of the Left Sadaijin
Minister of the Right Udaijin
Minister of the Center Naidaijin
Major Counselor Dainagon
Middle Counselor Chūnagon
Minor Counselor Shōnagon
Eight Ministries
Center Nakatsukasa-shō   
Ceremonial Shikibu-shō
Civil Administration Jibu-shō
Popular Affairs Minbu-shō
War Hyōbu-shō
Justice Gyōbu-shō
Treasury Ōkura-shō
Imperial Household Kunai-shō

The Ministry of the Treasury (大蔵省, Ōkura-shō) (lit. the department of the great treasury) was a division of the eighth-century Japanese government of the Imperial Court in Kyoto, [1] instituted in the Asuka period and formalized during the Heian period. The Ministry was replaced in the Meiji period.

Contents

Overview

The nature of the ministry was modified in response to changing times. The ambit of the Ministry's activities encompasses, for example:

History

The duties, responsibilities and focus of the ministry evolved over time. It was established as part of the Taika Reforms and Ritsuryō laws. [3] Since 1885, Ōkura-shō has been construed in reference to the Ministry of Finance, also called the Ōkura no Tsukasa. [4]

Hierarchy

The court included a ministry dealing with military affairs. [3]

Amongst the significant daijō-kan officials serving in this ministry structure were:

See also

Notes

  1. Kawakami, Karl Kiyoshi. (1903). The Political Ideas of the Modern Japan, pp. 36-38. , p. 36, at Google Books
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Kawakami, p. 38 n2, , p. 38, at Google Books citing Ito Hirobumi, Commentaries on the Japanese Constitution, p. 87 (1889).
  3. 1 2 Ministry of the Treasury, Sheffield.
  4. Nussbaum, Louis Frédéric et al. (2005). "Ōkura-shō" in Japan Encyclopedia, p. 749. , p. 749, at Google Books
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Titsingh, Isaac. (1834). Annales des empereurs du japon, p. 432. , p. 432, at Google Books

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