Mississippi's 2nd congressional district

Last updated
Mississippi's 2nd congressional district
Mississippi US Congressional District 2 (since 2013).tif
Mississippi's 2nd congressional district since January 3, 2013
Representative
  Bennie Thompson
DBolton
Area14,519.68 sq mi (37,605.8 km2)
Distribution
  • 62.67% urban
  • 37.33% rural
Population (2006)711,164
Median income$35,842 [1]
Ethnicity
Cook PVI D+14 [2]

Mississippi's 2nd congressional district (MS-2) covers much of Western Mississippi. It includes most of Jackson, the riverfront cities of Greenville and Vicksburg and the interior market cities of Clarksdale, Greenwood and Clinton. The district is approximately 275 miles (443 km) long, 180 miles (290 km) wide and borders the Mississippi River; it encompasses much of the Mississippi Delta, and a total of 15 counties and parts of several others. It is the only majority-black district in the state.

Contents

The district is home to four of Mississippi's eight public four-year colleges and universities: Alcorn State University in Lorman; Delta State University in Cleveland; Jackson State University in Jackson; and Mississippi Valley State University in Itta Bena, a few miles west of Greenwood. All except Delta State are HBCUs and are members of the Southwestern Athletic Conference.

From statehood to the election of 1846, Mississippi elected representatives at-large statewide on a general ticket. This favored candidates who could command a majority of the voters, then consisting mostly of white men of property.

Following Reconstruction, the Democratic Party regained control of the state legislature and worked to reduce Republican voting strength in the state. It redefined congressional districts, creating a 'shoestring' congressional district running the length of the Mississippi River and taking in the black-majority (then Republican) areas of the Mississippi Delta. By this gerrymandering, they created five other districts with white majorities. [3]

Election campaigns were often accompanied by fraud and violence as Democrats tried to reduce black Republican voting. Finally, the Democratic-dominated legislature passed a new constitution in 1890, with barriers to voter registration and other measures that effectively disenfranchised most blacks and many poor whites for decades, subduing the Republican and Populist movements of the late 19th century. [4]

The legislature has redefined congressional districts over the years to reflect population changes in the state. Districts 5 through 8 were reallocated to the 1st, 3rd and 4th. The 2nd, bounded by the Mississippi River on the west, continues to have a black-majority population. Since the 20th-century realignment of political parties in the South following passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965, which provided federal oversight and enforcement to protect voting, African-American residents here have consistently supported Democratic party candidates. On the other hand, most white conservatives have shifted into the Republican Party, which dominates the legislature. The district is one of the poorest in the state, [5] with 26.2% of people in poverty as of 2017. [6]

The district's current Representative is Democrat Bennie Thompson.


Recent election results

2000

2000 United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi: District 2
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Democratic Bennie Thompson (Incumbent) 112,777 65.07
Republican Hardy Caraway 54,09031.21
Libertarian William G. Chipman 4,3052.48
Reform Lee F. Dilworth 2,1351.23
Turnout 173,307
Majority58,68733.86

2002

2002 United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi: District 2
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Democratic Bennie Thompson (Incumbent) 89,913 55.14 -9.93
Republican Clinton B. LeSueur 69,71142.75+11.54
Reform Lee F. Dilworth 3,4262.10+0.87
Turnout 163,050
Majority20,20212.39

2004

2004 United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi: District 2
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Democratic Bennie Thompson (Incumbent) 154,626 58.38 +3.24
Republican Clinton B. LeSueur 107,64740.64-2.11
Reform Shawn O'Hara 2,5960.98-1.12
Turnout 264,869
Majority46,97917.74

2006

2006 United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi: District 2
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Democratic Bennie Thompson (Incumbent) 100,168 64.27 +5.89
Republican Yvonne R. Brown 55,67235.73-4.91
Turnout 155,832
Majority44,49628.55

2008

2008 United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi: District 2
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Democratic Bennie Thompson (Incumbent) 201,606 69.05 +4.78
Republican Richard Cook90,36430.95-4.78
Turnout 291,970
Majority111,24238.10

2010

2010 United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi: District 2
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Bennie Thompson (Incumbent) 105,327 61.47
Republican Bill Marcy64,49937.64
Reform Ashley Norwood1,5300.89
Total votes171,356100.00
Democratic hold

2012

2012 United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi: District 2
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Bennie Thompson (Incumbent) 214,978 67.13
Republican Bill Marcy99,16030.96
Independent Cobby Williams4,6051.44
Reform Lajena Williams1,5010.47
Total votes320,244100.00
Democratic hold

2014

2014 United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi: District 2
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Bennie Thompson (Incumbent) 100,688 67.7
Independent Troy Ray36,46524.5
Reform Shelley Shoemake11,4937.7
Total votes148,646100.00
Democratic hold

2016

2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi: District 2
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Bennie Thompson (Incumbent) 192,343 67.1
Republican John Bouie II83,54229.1
Independent Troy Ray6,9182.4
Reform Johnny McLeod3,8231.3
Total votes286,626100.00
Democratic hold

2018

2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi: District 2
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Bennie Thompson (Incumbent) 158,921 71.8
Independent Troy Ray48,10421.7
Reform Irving Harris14,3546.5
Total votes221,379100.00
Democratic hold

List of members representing the district

NamePartyYears of ServiceCong
ress
Electoral history
District created March 4, 1847
Winfield Scott Featherston.jpg
Winfield S. Featherston
Democratic March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1851
30th
31st
[Data unknown/missing.]
John A. Wilcox Unionist March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
32nd [Data unknown/missing.]
William T. S. Barry Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33rd [Data unknown/missing.]
Hendley S. Bennett Democratic March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th [Data unknown/missing.]
Reuben Davis.jpg
Reuben Davis
Democratic March 4, 1857 –
January 12, 1861
35th
36th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Withdrew.
VacantJanuary 12, 1861 –
February 23, 1870
36th
37th
38th
39th
40th
41st
Civil War and Reconstruction
Hon. Joseph L. Morphis, Miss - NARA - 527107.jpg
Joseph L. Morphis
Republican February 23, 1870 –
March 3, 1873
41st
42nd
[Data unknown/missing.]
Albert R. Howe Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
43rd [Data unknown/missing.]
GuilfordWWells.jpg
G. Wiley Wells
Independent Republican March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
44th [Data unknown/missing.]
VanHManning.jpg
Van H. Manning
Democratic March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1883
45th
46th
47th
[Data unknown/missing.]
VacantMarch 4, 1883 –
June 25, 1884
JamesRonaldChalmersp157crop.jpg
James R. Chalmers
Independent June 25, 1884 –
March 3, 1885
48th Seated after contested election with Van H. Manning.
James B. Morgan Democratic March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1891
49th
50th
51st
[Data unknown/missing.]
John C. Kyle (Mississippi Congressman).jpg
John C. Kyle
Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1897
52nd
53rd
54th
[Data unknown/missing.]
WVA Sullivan.jpg
William V. Sullivan
Democratic March 4, 1897 –
May 31, 1898
55th [Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned when appointed U.S. Senator.
VacantMay 31, 1898 –
July 5, 1898
ThomasSpight.jpg
Thomas Spight
Democratic July 5, 1898 –
March 3, 1911
55th
56th
57th
58th
59th
60th
61st
[Data unknown/missing.]
HubertDStephens.jpg
Hubert D. Stephens
Democratic March 4, 1911 –
March 3, 1921
62nd
63rd
64th
65th
66th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Bill G. Lowrey (Mississippi Congressman).jpg
Bill G. Lowrey
Democratic March 4, 1921 –
March 3, 1929
67th
68th
69th
70th
[Data unknown/missing.]
U.S. Senator Wall Doxey (D-MS).jpg
Wall Doxey
Democratic March 4, 1929 –
September 28, 1941
71st
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned when elected U.S. Senator.
VacantSeptember 28, 1941 –
November 4, 1941
Jamie L. Whitten.jpg
Jamie Whitten
Democratic November 4, 1941 –
January 3, 1973
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 1st district .
Bowen DR.png
David R. Bowen
Democratic January 3, 1973 –
January 3, 1983
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Webb Franklin.png
Webb Franklin
Republican January 3, 1983 –
January 3, 1987
98th
99th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Mike Espy, Official Portrait, 101st Congress.png
Mike Espy
Democratic January 3, 1987 –
January 22, 1993
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
[Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned when confirmed as United States Secretary of Agriculture
VacantJanuary 22, 1993 –
April 13, 1993
Bennie G. Thompson 113th Congress.jpg
Bennie Thompson
Democratic April 13, 1993 –
present
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
116th
Elected to finish Espys term.

Living former Members

As of May 2019, there are three living former members. The most recent representative to die was Jamie Whitten (served 1941–1973) on September 9, 1995.

RepresentativeTerm of officeDate of birth (and age)
David R. Bowen 1973–1983October 21, 1932 (age 87)
Webb Franklin 1983–1987December 13, 1941 (age 78)
Mike Espy 1987–1993November 30, 1953 (age 66)

Historical district boundaries

2003 - 2013 MS02 109.gif
2003 - 2013

See also

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References

  1. https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=28&cd=02
  2. "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  3. Eric Foner, Reconstruction, 1863-1877, New York: Perennial Classics, p. 590.
  4. Michael Perman, Struggle for Mastery: Disfranchisement in the South, 1888-1908 (2000), ch 4.
  5. "Rich, poor, young, old: Congressional districts at a glance | Bloomberg Government". Bloomberg Government. 2017-09-15. Retrieved 2018-11-21.
  6. "datatables". www.frac.org. Retrieved 2018-11-21.

Coordinates: 33°10′35″N90°21′03″W / 33.17639°N 90.35083°W / 33.17639; -90.35083