Mizuma Railway Mizuma Line

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Mizuma Railway Mizuma Line
Mizuma 1000 Series 01.jpg
1000 series EMU
Technical
Track gauge 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in)
Electrification 1500 V DC
Route map
Mizumatetudou rosenzu EN.GIF
Mizuma Line
km
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0.0
Kaizuka
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0.8
Kaizuka Shiyakushomae
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1.2
Koginosato
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2.0
Ishizai
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2.8
Sechigo
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3.2
Nagose
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4.3
Mori
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4.7
Mitsumatsu
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5.1
Mikayamaguchi
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5.5
Mizuma Kannon

The Mizuma Line (水間線, Mizuma-sen) is a Japanese railway line between Mizuma Kannon Station and Kaizuka Station, all within Kaizuka, Ōsaka. This is the only railway line of a private railway company Mizuma Railway (水間鉄道, Mizuma Tetsudō) operates. The company also operates bus services.

Contents

The company or the line is commonly called Suitetsu (水鉄).

Basic data

History

The line opened between December 1925 and January 1926, electrified at 600 VDC.

Freight services ceased in 1972, and in 1990 the line voltage was increased to 1,500 VDC.

Proposed connecting line

Stations

All stations are in Kaizuka, Osaka, Osaka Prefecture. For distances and connections, see the route diagram.

See also

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References

This article incorporates material from the corresponding article in the Japanese Wikipedia