Mono County, California

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Mono County, California
County of Mono
Mono Lake from Mount Dana (1).jpg
Mono Lake, the dominant geographical feature in Mono County
Seal of Mono County, California.png
Logo of Mono County, California.png
Mono County, California
Interactive map of Mono County
Map of California highlighting Mono County.svg
Location in the state of California
Coordinates: 37°55′N118°52′W / 37.917°N 118.867°W / 37.917; -118.867 Coordinates: 37°55′N118°52′W / 37.917°N 118.867°W / 37.917; -118.867
Country United States
State California
Region Eastern California
Founded1861
Named for Mono Lake, which is derived from Monachi, a Yokutsan name for native peoples of the Sierra Nevada
County seat Bridgeport
Largest city Mammoth Lakes (population and area)
Government
  Type Council–CAO
  BodyBoard of Supervisors
  Chair [1] Bob Gardner
  Vice Chair [2] Rhonda Duggan
  Chair Pro Tem [3] John Peters
  Board of Supervisors [4]
Supervisors
  County Administrative OfficerBob Lawton
Area
  Total3,132 sq mi (8,110 km2)
  Land3,049 sq mi (7,900 km2)
  Water83 sq mi (210 km2)
Highest elevation
[5]
14,252 ft (4,344 m)
Population
 (2020) [6]
  Total13,195
  Density4.2/sq mi (1.6/km2)
Time zone UTC-8 (Pacific Time Zone)
  Summer (DST) UTC-7 (Pacific Daylight Time)
Area code 530, 442 and 760
Website www.monocounty.ca.gov

Mono County ( /ˈmn/ MOH-noh) is a county located in the east central portion of the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 13,195, [6] making it the fourth-least populous county in California. The county seat is Bridgeport. [7] [8] The county is located east of the Sierra Nevada between Yosemite National Park and Nevada. The only incorporated town in the county is Mammoth Lakes, [9] which is located at the foot of Mammoth Mountain. [10] Other locations, such as June Lake, are also famous as skiing and fishing resorts. Located in the middle of the county is Mono Lake, a vital habitat for millions of migratory and nesting birds. The lake is located in a wild natural setting, with pinnacles of tufa arising out of the salty and alkaline lake. Also located in Mono County is Bodie, the official state gold rush ghost town, which is now a California State Historic Park.

Contents

History

Bodie, as seen from the hill looking to the cemetery Bodie6Aug2006.JPG
Bodie, as seen from the hill looking to the cemetery

Mono County was formed in 1861 from parts of Calaveras, Fresno and Mariposa counties. A portion of northern Mono County contributed to the formation of Alpine County in 1864; parts of the county's territory were given to Inyo County in 1866.

The county is named after Mono Lake which, in 1852, was named for a Native American Paiute tribe, the Mono people, who historically inhabited the Sierra Nevada from north of Mono Lake to Owens Lake. The tribe's western neighbors, the Yokuts, called them monachie, meaning "fly people" because they used fly larvae as their chief food staple and trading article. [11]

Archeologists know almost nothing about the first inhabitants of the county, as little material evidence has been found from them. The Kuzedika, a band of Paiute, had been there many generations by the time the first anglophones arrived. The Kuzedika were hunter-gatherers and their language is a part of the Shoshone language. [11]

Geography

Mono Lake Tufa State Reserve Lakeside of Mono Lake.jpg
Mono Lake Tufa State Reserve

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 3,132 square miles (8,110 km2), of which 3,049 square miles (7,900 km2) is land and 83 square miles (210 km2) (2.6%) is water. [12] The highest point in Mono County is White Mountain Peak which, at 14,252 feet (4344.0 m), is the third-highest peak in California.

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1870 430
1880 7,4991,644.0%
1890 2,002−73.3%
1900 2,1678.2%
1910 2,042−5.8%
1920 960−53.0%
1930 1,36041.7%
1940 2,29969.0%
1950 2,115−8.0%
1960 2,2134.6%
1970 4,01681.5%
1980 8,577113.6%
1990 9,95616.1%
2000 12,85329.1%
2010 14,20210.5%
2020 13,195−7.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [14]
1790–1960 [15] 1900–1990 [16]
1990–2000 [17] 2010 [18] 2020 [19]

2021

In June 2021, U.S. News & World Report ranked the county with the third best life expectancy in the United States at 96.5 years old. [20]

2020 census

Mono County, California - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / EthnicityPop 2010 [18] Pop 2020 [19] % 2010% 2020
White alone (NH)9,6878,67968.21%65.77%
Black or African American alone (NH)42680.30%0.52%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH)2391771.68%1.34%
Asian alone (NH)1911591.34%1.21%
Pacific Islander alone (NH)11260.08%0.20%
Some Other Race alone (NH)33780.23%0.59%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH)2375011.67%3.80%
Hispanic or Latino (any race)3,7623,50726.49%26.58%
Total14,20213,195100.00%100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

2011

Places by population, race, and income

2010 Census

The 2010 United States Census reported that Mono County had a population of 14,202. The racial makeup of Mono County was 11,697 (82.4%) White, 47 (0.3%) African American, 302 (2.1%) Native American, 192 (1.4%) Asian, 11 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 1,539 (10.8%) from other races, and 414 (2.9%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3,762 persons (26.5%). [29]

2000

As of the census [30] of 2000, there were 12,853 people, 5,137 households, and 3,143 families residing in the county. The population density was 4/sq mi (1.5/km2). There were 11,757 housing units at an average density of 4/sq mi (1.5/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 84.2% White, 0.5% Black or African American, 2.4% Native American, 1.1% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 9.5% from other races, and 2.3% from two or more races. 17.7% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 13.4% were of German, 12.6% Irish and 11.4% English ancestry according to Census 2000. 84.0% spoke English and 15.1% Spanish as their first language.

There were 5,137 households, out of which 28.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.6% were married couples living together, 6.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.8% were non-families. 26.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 23.0% under the age of 18, 10.3% from 18 to 24, 33.4% from 25 to 44, 25.6% from 45 to 64, and 7.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 121.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 126.8 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $44,992, and the median income for a family was $50,487. Males had a median income of $32,600 versus $26,227 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,422. About 6.3% of families and 11.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.2% of those under age 18 and 1.9% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

Voter registration

Cities by population and voter registration

Overview

In November 2008, Mono County was one of just three counties in California's interior in which voters rejected Proposition 8 which sought to ban gay marriage. The county's voters rejected Proposition 8 by 55.5 percent to 44.5 percent. The other interior counties in which Proposition 8 failed to receive a majority of votes were neighboring Alpine County and Yolo County. [32]

Mono County is in California's 8th congressional district , represented by Republican Jay Obernolte. [33]

In the state legislature Mono is in the 5th Assembly district, which is held by Republican Frank Bigelow, and the 8th Senate district, which is held by Republican Tom Berryhill.

United States presidential election results for Mono County, California [34]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.%No.%No.%
2020 2,51337.30%4,01359.56%2123.15%
2016 2,11139.97%2,77352.51%3977.52%
2012 2,28544.10%2,73352.75%1633.15%
2008 2,35442.25%3,09355.52%1242.23%
2004 2,62149.10%2,62849.23%891.67%
2000 2,29652.53%1,78840.91%2876.57%
1996 1,88246.00%1,58038.62%62915.38%
1992 1,57036.05%1,48934.19%1,29629.76%
1988 2,17761.38%1,28436.20%862.42%
1984 2,65972.31%96226.16%561.52%
1980 2,13262.32%86525.29%42412.39%
1976 1,60058.80%1,02537.67%963.53%
1972 1,87266.88%82829.58%993.54%
1968 1,13064.28%46526.45%1639.27%
1964 85056.07%66643.93%00.00%
1960 91266.33%45733.24%60.44%
1956 67373.79%23725.99%20.22%
1952 89176.61%26422.70%80.69%
1948 54164.79%25530.54%394.67%
1944 37860.87%24238.97%10.16%
1940 45946.13%52352.56%131.31%
1936 24134.09%45864.78%81.13%
1932 19934.25%37464.37%81.38%
1928 22061.80%12735.67%92.53%
1924 16653.55%4514.52%9931.94%
1920 17067.73%5622.31%259.96%
1916 13742.02%15848.47%319.51%
1912 30.81%18249.32%18449.86%
1908 22459.89%12132.35%297.75%
1904 24564.64%8221.64%5213.72%
1900 28452.11%25847.34%30.55%
1896 25944.27%31553.85%111.88%
1892 28653.36%16630.97%8415.67%


Crime

The following table includes the number of incidents reported and the rate per 1,000 persons for each type of offense.

Cities by population and crime rates

Transportation

The Mono County Courthouse in Bridgeport. Bridgeport, California Historic Court House, Main Street - August 2012.jpg
The Mono County Courthouse in Bridgeport.

Major highways

Public transportation

Eastern Sierra Transit Authority operates intercity bus service along U.S. 395, as well as local services in Mammoth Lakes. Service extends south to Lancaster, California (Los Angeles County) and north to Reno, Nevada.

Yosemite Area Regional Transit System (YARTS) also runs along U.S. 395 from Mammoth Lakes to Lee Vining before entering Yosemite National Park.

Airports

General aviation airports in Mono County include Bryant Field near Bridgeport, Mammoth Yosemite Airport and Lee Vining Airport. In December 2021, seasonal commercial air service by United Airlines to San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Denver began at the Eastern Sierra Regional Airport in Bishop, providing local service to southern Mono County.

Communities

Town

Census-designated places

Population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Mono County. [37]

county seat

RankCity/Town/etc.Municipal typePopulation (2010 Census)
1 Mammoth Lakes Town8,234
2 Crowley Lake CDP875
3 Walker CDP721
4 Chalfant CDP651
5 June Lake CDP629
6 Bridgeport CDP575
7 Coleville CDP495
8 Benton CDP280
9 Lee Vining CDP222
10 Swall Meadows CDP220
11 Sunny Slopes CDP182
12 Mono City CDP172
13 Paradise CDP153
14 Benton Reservation (Utu Utu Gwaitu Paiute Tribe) [38] AIAN 76
15 Aspen Springs CDP65
16 Topaz CDP50
17 McGee Creek CDP41
18 Bridgeport Reservation (Paiute Indians) [39] AIAN35

See also

Notes

  1. Other = Some other race + Two or more races
  2. Native American = Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander + American Indian or Alaska Native
  3. 1 2 Percentage of registered voters with respect to total population. Percentages of party members with respect to registered voters follow.
  4. Only larceny-theft cases involving property over $400 in value are reported as property crimes.

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References

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Further reading