Monte Hellman

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Monte Hellman
Monte Hellman in 2013.jpg
Hellman in 2013
Born (1932-07-12) July 12, 1932 (age 86)
Education Los Angeles High School
Alma mater Stanford University
OccupationFilm director, writer, producer, editor
Spouse(s) Barboura Morris (1954-?) [1]

Monte Hellman /ˈmɔːnti/ (born July 12, 1932) [2] is an American film director, producer, writer, and editor. Hellman began his career as an editor's apprentice at ABC TV, and made his directorial debut with the horror film Beast from Haunted Cave (1959), produced by Roger Corman.

American Broadcasting Company American broadcast television network

The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American commercial broadcast television network that is a flagship property of Walt Disney Television, a subsidiary of the Disney Media Networks division of The Walt Disney Company. The network is headquartered in Burbank, California on Riverside Drive, directly across the street from Walt Disney Studios and adjacent to the Roy E. Disney Animation Building, But the network's second corporate headquarters and News headquarters remains in New York City, New York at their broadcast center on 77 West 66th Street in Lincoln Square in Upper West Side Manhattan.

<i>Beast from Haunted Cave</i> 1959 film by Monte Hellman

Beast from Haunted Cave is a 1959 horror/heist film directed by Monte Hellman and starring Michael Forest, Frank Wolff and Richard Sinatra. It was produced by Gene Corman, Roger Corman's brother. Filmed in South Dakota at the same time as Ski Troop Attack, it tells the story of bank robbers fleeing in the snow who run afoul of a giant spider-like monster that feeds on humans. The film was released as a double feature with The Wasp Woman (1959).

Roger Corman American film director, producer, and actor

Roger William Corman is an American director, producer, and actor. He has been called "The Pope of Pop Cinema" and is known as a trailblazer in the world of independent film. Much of Corman's work has an established critical reputation, such as his cycle of low-budget cult films adapted from the tales of Edgar Allan Poe.

Contents

He would later gain critical recognition for the Western Ride in the Whirlwind (1966) starring Jack Nicholson, and the independent road movie Two-Lane Blacktop (1971) starring James Taylor and Dennis Wilson. His later directorial work has included the 1989 slasher film Silent Night, Deadly Night 3: Better Watch Out! and the independent thriller Road to Nowhere (2010).

<i>Ride in the Whirlwind</i> 1965 film by Monte Hellman

Ride in the Whirlwind is a 1965 Western film directed by Monte Hellman and starring Cameron Mitchell, Millie Perkins, Jack Nicholson, and Harry Dean Stanton. Nicholson also wrote and co-produced the film.

Jack Nicholson 20th and 21st-century American actor, film director, producer, and writer

John Joseph Nicholson, known professionally as Jack Nicholson, is an American actor and filmmaker who has performed for over sixty years. He is known for playing a wide range of starring or supporting roles, including satirical comedy, romance, and dark portrayals of anti-heroes and villainous characters. In many of his films, he has played the "eternal outsider, the sardonic drifter", someone who rebels against the social structure.

<i>Two-Lane Blacktop</i> 1971 film by Monte Hellman

Two-Lane Blacktop is a 1971 road movie directed by Monte Hellman and starring singer-songwriter James Taylor, the Beach Boys drummer Dennis Wilson, Warren Oates, and Laurie Bird. "Blacktop" means an asphalt road.

Early life

Monte Hellman was born July 12, 1932, in New York City to Gertrude (née Edelstein) and Fred Himmelbaum, [3] who were vacationing in New York at the time of his birth. [2] The family ended up settling in Albany, New York, before relocating to Los Angeles, California, when Hellman was 5 years old. [4]

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually called either New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States. With an estimated 2018 population of 8,398,748 distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2), New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 19,979,477 people in its 2018 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 22,679,948 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

Albany, New York Capital of New York

Albany is the capital of the U.S. state of New York and the seat of Albany County. Albany is located on the west bank of the Hudson River approximately 10 miles (16 km) south of its confluence with the Mohawk River and approximately 135 miles (220 km) north of New York City.

Hellman graduated from Los Angeles High School, and attended Stanford University, graduating in 1951. He then attended graduate school at the University of California, Los Angeles, but did not complete his studies. [4]

Los Angeles High School public magnet secondary school in the Los Angeles Unified School District, in Los Angeles, California, U.S., founded in 1873

Los Angeles High School is the oldest public high school in the Southern California Region and in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Its colors are royal blue and white and the teams are called the Romans.

Stanford University Private research university in Stanford, California

Leland Stanford Junior University is a private research university in Stanford, California. Stanford is known for its academic strength, selectivity, wealth, proximity to Silicon Valley, and ranking as one of the world's top universities. Often ranking first among all universities both domestically and internationally has led Stanford to be known as America's "dream college".

University of California, Los Angeles Public research university in Los Angeles, California

The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) is a public research university in Los Angeles. It became the Southern Branch of the University of California in 1919, making it the fourth-oldest of the 10-campus University of California system. It offers 337 undergraduate and graduate degree programs in a wide range of disciplines. UCLA enrolls about 31,000 undergraduate and 13,000 graduate students and had 119,000 applicants for Fall 2016, including transfer applicants, making the school the most applied-to of any American university.

Career

Hellman is among a group of directing talent mentored by Roger Corman, who produced several of the director's early films. According to film scholar Wheeler Winston Dixon, Hellman began by working on "low budget exploitation films with a personal slant," yet learned from Corman the art of producing commercially viable films on a tight budget while staying true to a personal vision. [5] Hellman's most critically acclaimed film to date has been Two-Lane Blacktop (1971), a road movie that was a box office failure at the time of its initial release but has subsequently turned into a perennial cult favorite. [6] Hellman's two acid westerns starring Jack Nicholson, Ride in the Whirlwind and The Shooting , both shot in 1965 and released directly to television in 1968, have also developed cult followings, particularly the latter. [6] Hellman and his stuntman Gary Kent talk about the making of the westerns in the 2018 documentary Love and Other Stunts. [7] A third western, China 9, Liberty 37 (1978), was far less successful critically, although it too has its admirers, [8] as do Cockfighter (1974) (aka Born to Kill) [9] and Iguana (1988). [10] In 1989, he directed the straight-to-video slasher film Silent Night, Deadly Night 3: Better Watch Out!

Wheeler Winston Dixon American filmmaker and scholar

Wheeler Winston Dixon is an American filmmaker and scholar. He is an expert on film history, theory and criticism. His scholarship has particular emphasis on François Truffaut, Jean-Luc Godard, American experimental cinema and horror films. He has written extensively on numerous aspects of film, including his books A Short History of Film and A History of Horror. From 1999 through the end of 2014, he was co-editor, along with Gwendolyn Audrey Foster, of the Quarterly Review of Film and Video. He is regarded as a top reviewer of films. In addition, he is notable as an experimental American filmmaker with films made over several decades, and the Museum of Modern Art exhibited his works in 2003. He taught at Rutgers University, The New School in New York, the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, and is currently the Ryan professor of film studies and English at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln.

Road movie film genre in which the main characters leave home on a road trip, typically altering the perspective from their everyday lives

A road movie is a film genre in which the main characters leave home on a road trip, typically altering the perspective from their everyday lives. Road movies often depict travel in the hinterlands, with the films exploring the theme of alienation and examining the tensions and issues of the cultural identity of a nation or historical period; this is all often enmeshed in a mood of actual or potential menace, lawlessness, and violence, a "distinctly existential air" and is populated by restless, "frustrated, often desperate characters". The setting includes not just the close confines of the car as it moves on highways and roads, but also booths in diners and rooms in roadside motels, all of which helps to create intimacy and tension between the characters. Road movies tend to focus on the theme of masculinity, some type of rebellion, car culture, and self-discovery. The core theme of road movies is "rebellion against conservative social norms".

Cult film film that has acquired a cult following

A cult film or cult movie, also commonly referred to as a cult classic, is a film that has acquired a cult following. Cult films are known for their dedicated, passionate fanbase, an elaborate subculture that engage in repeated viewings, quoting dialogue, and audience participation. Inclusive definitions allow for major studio productions, especially box office bombs, while exclusive definitions focus more on obscure, transgressive films shunned by the mainstream. The difficulty in defining the term and subjectivity of what qualifies as a cult film mirror classificatory disputes about art. The term cult film itself was first used in the 1970s to describe the culture that surrounded underground films and midnight movies, though cult was in common use in film analysis for decades prior to that.

In addition to his directorial career, Hellman worked on several films in different capacities. He was the dialogue director for Corman's The St. Valentine's Day Massacre (1967), and second-unit director on Paul Verhoeven's RoboCop (1987). Hellman finished two pictures in post-production that were started by other directors who died after the movies were shot, the Muhammad Ali bio The Greatest (1977) (started by Tom Gries) and Avalanche Express (1979) (begun by Mark Robson). He shot extra footage for the television versions of Ski Troop Attack (1960), Last Woman on Earth (1960), Creature from the Haunted Sea , and Sergio Leone's A Fistful of Dollars (1964). Among the movies on which Hellman served as editor are Corman's The Wild Angels (1966), Bob Rafelson's Head (1968), Sam Peckinpah's The Killer Elite (1975) and Jonathan Demme's Fighting Mad (1976).[ citation needed ]

Paul Verhoeven Dutch film director, screenwriter and film producer

Paul Verhoeven is a Dutch director, screenwriter and film producer. Active in both the Netherlands and Hollywood, Verhoeven's blending of graphic violence and sexual content with social satire are trademarks of both his drama and science fiction films. He directed the films Turkish Delight (1973), RoboCop (1987), Total Recall (1990), Basic Instinct (1992), Showgirls (1995), Starship Troopers (1997), Hollow Man (2000), Black Book (2006) and Elle (2016).

<i>RoboCop</i> 1987 science fiction film directed by Paul Verhoeven

RoboCop is a 1987 American cyberpunk superhero action film directed by Paul Verhoeven and written by Edward Neumeier and Michael Miner. The film stars Peter Weller, Nancy Allen, Dan O'Herlihy, Kurtwood Smith, Miguel Ferrer, and Ronny Cox. Set in a crime-ridden Detroit, Michigan, in the near future, RoboCop centers on police officer Alex Murphy (Weller) who is murdered by a gang of criminals and subsequently revived by the megacorporation Omni Consumer Products (OCP) as a superhuman cyborg law enforcer known as RoboCop.

Muhammad Ali American boxer, philanthropist and activist

Muhammad Ali was an American professional boxer, activist, and philanthropist. He is nicknamed "The Greatest" and is widely regarded as one of the most significant and celebrated sports figures of the 20th century and as one of the greatest boxers of all time.

Hellman was an executive producer on Quentin Tarantino's debut feature Reservoir Dogs (1992). [11]

In 2006, he directed "Stanley's Girlfriend," a section of the omnibus horror film Trapped Ashes . Hellman's section of the film was presented by the Cannes Film Festival that year as an "Official Selection," and Hellman was named president of the festival's Un Certain Regard jury.

In 2010, he completed a new feature film, the romantic noir thriller Road to Nowhere , which competed for the Golden Lion at the 67th Venice International Film Festival. [12]

He currently teaches in the Film Directing Program at the California Institute of the Arts.

At the 2010 Venice Film Festival, he was awarded with a special career prize. [13] [14]

Filmography

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<i>The Shooting</i> 1966 film by Monte Hellman

The Shooting is a 1966 western film directed by Monte Hellman, with a screenplay by Carole Eastman. It stars Warren Oates, Millie Perkins, Will Hutchins, and Jack Nicholson, and was produced by Nicholson and Hellman. The story is about two men who are hired by a mysterious woman to accompany her to a town located many miles across the desert. During their journey, they are closely tracked by a black-clad gunslinger who seems intent on killing all of them.

<i>The Terror</i> (1963 film) 1963 film by Jack Nicholson, Roger Corman, Francis Ford Coppola, Jack Hill, Monte Hellman

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<i>Cockfighter</i> 1974 film by Monte Hellman

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Laurie Bird film actor, photographer

Laurie Bird was an American film actress and photographer. She appeared in three films during the 1970s. Two of them were directed by Monte Hellman. She was romantically involved with Hellman and Art Garfunkel, committing suicide in the latter's apartment by taking an overdose of Valium. Bird inspired one of Tim Kinsella's novels.

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Road to Nowhere is a 2010 American romance thriller independent film directed by Monte Hellman, written by Steven Gaydos, and starring Cliff De Young, Waylon Payne, Shannyn Sossamon, Tygh Runyan, and Dominique Swain. It is Hellman's first feature film in 21 years.

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References

  1. McGilligan, Patrick (1996). Jack's Life: A Biography of Jack Nicholson. W. W. Norton & Company. p. 94. ISBN   9780393313789 . Retrieved August 12, 2017.
  2. 1 2 Dixon 2007, p. 98.
  3. "Monte Hellman (1932–)". Film Reference. Retrieved December 30, 2016.
  4. 1 2 Dixon 2007, p. 100.
  5. Wheeler Winston Dixon, Rutgers University Press, Jul 11, 2007, Film Talk: Directors at Work, Retrieved November 10, 2014 (see page xi Introduction paragraph 2), ISBN   978-0-8135-4077-1
  6. 1 2 Peary, Danny. Cult Movies , Delta Books, 1981. ISBN   0-517-20185-2
  7. Wells, Ron. "China 9, Liberty 37". Film Threat . Retrieved September 21, 2006.
  8. "Cockfighter". DVD Beaver. Retrieved September 21, 2006.
  9. Thompson, Nathaniel. "The Films of Monte Hellman". Mondo Digital. Retrieved September 21, 2006.
  10. Fitzmaurice, Larry. "Quentin Tarantino: The Complete Syllabus of His Influences and References". Slate. Retrieved September 9, 2015.
  11. "Venezia 67". labiennale.org. July 29, 2010. Retrieved July 29, 2010.
  12. "Quentin Tarantino denies Venice nepotism claim". BBC . September 13, 2010.
  13. "Official Awards of the 67th Venice Film Festival". La Biennale.
  14. 1 2 Phillips, Keith (November 10, 1999). "Monte Hellman – Two-Lane revisted (sic)". The Onion . Retrieved May 7, 2012.

Bibliography