Moor macaque

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Moor macaque [1]
Male macaque maure (Macaca maura).jpg
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Primates
Suborder: Haplorhini
Infraorder: Simiiformes
Family: Cercopithecidae
Genus: Macaca
Species:
M. maura
Binomial name
Macaca maura
(H.R. Schinz, 1825)
Moor Macaque area.png
Moor macaque range

The moor macaque (Macaca maura) is a macaque with brown/black body fur with a pale rump patch and pink bare skin on the rump. It is about 50–58.5 cm long, and eats figs, bamboo seeds, buds, sprouts, invertebrates and cereals in tropical rainforests. It is sometimes called "dog-ape" because of its dog-like muzzle, although it is no more closely related to apes than any other Old World monkey is. It is endemic to the island of Sulawesi in Indonesia.

The moor macaque is threatened mostly due to habitat loss from an expanding human population and deforestation to increase agricultural land area. The population is estimated to have decreased from 56,000 to under 10,000 from 1983 to 1994. [3] In 1992, Supriatna et al. (1992) conducted an extensive survey and found only 3,000–5,000 individuals (2,500 mature) of the species. [4] The survey estimated densities to be 25–50 individuals/km2 (18.7SD).[ citation needed ] Because several Sulawesi macaque species are endangered, information on ecology and behaviour is essential and conservation management plans are being conducted.

Related Research Articles

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Booted macaque Species of Old World monkey

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Hecks macaque Species of Old World monkey

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Pagai Island macaque Species of Old World monkey

The Pagai Island macaque, also known as the Pagai macaque or Bokkoi, is an Old World monkey endemic to the Mentawai Islands off the west coast of Sumatra. It is listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List due to its ever-shrinking habitat. Macaca pagensis formerly included the overall darker Siberut macaque as a subspecies, but this arrangement is polyphyletic, leading to the two being classified as separate species. Both were formerly considered subspecies of the southern pig-tailed macaque.

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Southern pig-tailed macaque Species of mammal

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Siberut macaque Species of Old World monkey

The Siberut macaque is a vulnerable species of macaque, which is endemic to Siberut Island in Indonesia. It was formerly considered conspecific with the Pagai Island macaque which is overall paler in color, but this arrangement was polyphyletic. Both were formerly considered subspecies of the southern pig-tailed macaque.

Siau Island tarsier Species of primate

The Siau Island tarsier is a species of tarsier from the tiny volcanic island of Siau in Indonesia.

Maros Regency Regency in South Sulawesi, Indonesia

Maros Regency is a regency of South Sulawesi province of Indonesia. It covers an area of 1,619.12 sq.km, and had a population of 319,002 at the 2010 Census and 338,917 at the Census of 2015. Almost all of the regency lies within the official metropolitan area of the city of Makassar. The capital town of the regency is Maros.

Tangkoko Batuangus Nature Reserve

Tangkoko Batuangus Nature Reserve also known as Tangkoko-Batuangus Dua Saudara is a nature reserve in the northern part of Sulawesi island of Indonesia, two hours drive from Manado. The reserve covers an area of 8,700 hectares and includes three mountains: Mount Tangkoko, Mount Dua Saudara and Mount Batuangus.

Sulawesi lowland rain forests

The Sulawesi lowland rain forests is a tropical moist forest ecoregion in Indonesia. The ecoregion includes the lowlands of Sulawesi and neighboring islands.

References

  1. Groves, C. P. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M. (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 162–163. ISBN   0-801-88221-4. OCLC   62265494.
  2. Supriatna, J.; Shekelle, M. & Burton, J. (2008). "Macaca maura". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . IUCN. 2008: e.T12553A3356200. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2008.RLTS.T12553A3356200.en.
  3. B. J. Evans; J. Supriatna; D. J. Melnick (April 3, 2001). "Hybridization and Population Genetics of Two Macaque Species in Sulawesi, Indonesia". Evolution. The Society for the Study of Evolution. 55 (8): 1688. doi: 10.1111/j.0014-3820.2001.tb00688.x . PMID   11580028.
  4. https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/12553/3356200