Morris S. Miller

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Morris S. Miller MorrisSMiller.jpg
Morris S. Miller

Morris Smith Miller (July 31, 1779 – November 16, 1824) was a United States representative from New York.

Life

Born in New York City, he graduated from Union College in 1798. He studied law, and was admitted to the bar. Miller served as private secretary to Governor John Jay, and subsequently, in 1806, commenced the practice of law in Utica. He was President of the Village of Utica in 1808; and judge of the court of common pleas of Oneida County from 1810 until his death in 1824.

Miller was elected as a Federalist to the 13th United States Congress, holding office from March 4, 1813 to March 3, 1815. He represented the United States Government at the negotiation of a treaty between the Seneca Indians and the proprietors of the Seneca Reservation at Buffalo, New York in July 1819.

He died on November 16, 1824, in Utica, New York; and was buried at the Albany Rural Cemetery.

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References

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
District restored
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 16th congressional district

1813–1815
Succeeded by