Moses Gabb

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Moses Gabb
Joel Moses Gabb (cropped).jpg
Member of the Australian Parliament
for Angas
In office
13 December 1919 14 November 1925
Preceded by Paddy Glynn
Succeeded by Walter Parsons
In office
12 October 1929 7 August 1934
Preceded by Walter Parsons
Succeeded byDivision abolished
Personal details
Born(1882-11-21)21 November 1882
Glenelg, South Australia
Died6 March 1951(1951-03-06) (aged 68)
Rosewater, South Australia
NationalityAustralian
Political party Labor (191931)
Independent (193134)
Spouse(s)Florence Ethel Hobbs
ChildrenSesom Gabb, Nance Gabb, Ruth Gabb, Glen Gabb
OccupationChurch worker, greengrocer

Joel Moses Gabb (21 November 1882 6 March 1951) was an Australian politician. He was a member of the Australian House of Representatives from 1919 to 1934, representing the electorate of Angas. He represented the Australian Labor Party until resigning during the 1931 Labor split; however, he did not join the United Australia Party along with the other dissident MPs, and instead remained in parliament as an independent.

The Division of Angas was an Australian Electoral Division in South Australia. The division was created in 1903 and abolished in 1934. It was named for George Fife Angas, a South Australian pioneer, and was based in various rural areas to the east, south-east, north-east and north-west of Adelaide at different times including Angaston, Cadell, Eudunda, Gawler, Kapunda, Nuriootpa, Mallala, Murray Bridge, Tanunda and Walker Flat and from 1922 stretched further eastward as far as the South Australian border. It was a generally marginal seat which was won at various times by the Australian Labor Party and the Nationalist Party.

Australian Labor Party Political party in Australia

The Australian Labor Party is a major centre-left political party in Australia. The party has been in opposition at the federal level since the 2013 election. The party is a federal party with branches in each state and territory. Labor is in government in the states of Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia, and in both the Australian Capital Territory and Northern Territory. The party competes against the Liberal/National Coalition for political office at the federal and state levels. It is the oldest political party in Australia.

The Australian Labor Party split of 1931 was caused by severe divisions within the Australian Labor Party over their economic response to the Great Depression in Australia. Amidst intense disagreement between economically conservative and radical elements of the party, two senior ministers in the Scullin Labor government, Joseph Lyons and James Fenton, resigned from Cabinet in January 1931. Lyons, Fenton and their supporters would subsequently merge with the conservative opposition Nationalist Party of Australia to form the new United Australia Party, led by Lyons with the last Nationalist leader, John Latham, as his deputy.

Contents

Early life, missionary and business work

Gabb was born in Glenelg, and was educated at St Peter's College. He worked for printers A. & E. Lewis and then for grocers Barns, Stobie, & Co. after leaving school. He had studied at night to become a Methodist missionary while working at the grocers, and after qualifying for home mission work, worked from 1905 reopening a mission on Kangaroo Island, then at churches in Cockburn, Silverton, Kalangadoo and Penola, and on the Tea Tree Gully Modbury circuit. He passed as a candidate for ministry and studied at Prince Alfred College in 1908, before spending two and a half years preaching from a motor launch on the Murray River between Swan Reach and Loxton. He then left missionary work because of doctrinal differences, did not enter the ministry, and instead opened a store at Alberton until his election to parliament. He married Florence Ethel Hobbs on 9 October 1912. He was publicly involved in the campaign against conscription during World War I, and unsuccessfully contested the 1918 state election in the electorate of Barossa, narrowly losing to Sir Richard Butler. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] Gabb was a strict teetotaller. [6]

Glenelg, South Australia Suburb of Adelaide, South Australia

Glenelg is a beach-side suburb of the South Australian capital of Adelaide. Located on the shore of Holdfast Bay in Gulf St Vincent, it has become a tourist destination due to its beach and many attractions, home to several hotels and dozens of restaurants.

St Peters College, Adelaide Independent primary and secondary day and boarding school in Australia

St Peter's College is an independent Anglican primary and secondary day and boarding school for boys located Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. Founded in 1847 by members of the Anglican Church of Australia, the school is noted for its history and famous alumni, including three Nobel laureates, forty-two Rhodes scholars, ten South Australian Premiers and the 2019 Australian of the Year.

Kangaroo Island island in South Australia

Kangaroo Island is Australia's third-largest island, after Tasmania and Melville Island. It lies in the state of South Australia 112 km (70 mi) southwest of Adelaide. Its closest point to the mainland is Snapper Point in Backstairs Passage which is 13.5 km (8.4 mi) from the Fleurieu Peninsula.

Federal politics

In 1919, he was elected to the Australian House of Representatives as the Labor member for Angas, defeating long-serving Nationalist MP and Minister for Home and Territories Paddy Glynn. [7] He drew public attention in 1920 when he refused to accept a salary increase from £600 to £1,000. [8] He was known for often calling quorum when the amount of MPs in the parliamentary chamber was low, believing that its strict application forced MPs to do their elected duties. [1] [6] He was re-elected at the 1922 election, defeating George Ritchie, who had resigned as state Treasurer to challenge Gabb. [4] Gabb was defeated by Nationalist candidate Walter Parsons in 1925, but defeated Parsons in 1929 to regain the seat. [1]

1919 Australian federal election

The 1919 Australian federal election was held on 13 December 1919 to elect members to the Parliament of Australia. All 75 seats in the House of Representatives and 19 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Nationalist Party government won re-election, with Prime Minister Billy Hughes continuing in office.

Paddy Glynn Australian politician

Patrick McMahon Glynn KC was an Australian lawyer and politician. He served in the House of Representatives from 1901 to 1919, and was a government minister under three prime ministers, as Attorney-General (1909–1910), Minister for External Affairs (1913–1914) and Minister for Home and Territories (1917–1920). Prior to entering federal politics, Glynn was involved in the drafting of the Constitution of Australia. Born in Ireland, he arrived in Australia in 1880 and served three terms in the South Australian House of Assembly, as well as a brief stint as Attorney-General of South Australia.

1922 Australian federal election

The 1922 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 16 December 1922. All 75 seats in the House of Representatives, and 19 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Nationalist Party, led by Prime Minister Billy Hughes lost its majority. However, the opposition Labor Party led by Matthew Charlton did not take office as the Nationalists sought a coalition with the fledgling Country Party led by Earle Page. The Country Party made Hughes's resignation the price for joining, and Hughes was replaced as Nationalist leader by Stanley Bruce.

In 1931, he joined Joseph Lyons and several other members in leaving the Labor Party in the 1931 Labor split and supported a no-confidence motion in Labor Prime Minister James Scullin; Gabb stated that he believed Scullin was a "sincere man", but strongly disapproved of Treasurer Ted Theodore. [9] Unlike his colleagues, did not join the new United Australia Party and instead remained in parliament as an independent. [1] In the same year, the Sydney Morning Herald described Gabb as being an "unexciting speaker" and "a sort of inverted alchemist afflicted with an ambition for turning gold into lead." [10] He responded to criticism for wasting parliamentary time with quorum calls in May by stating "if the economy were really considered this show [parliament] would be shut down" and "close it and let me act as Mussolini and I will run things in a better way!" [11]

Joseph Lyons 20th-century Australian politician, 10th Prime Minister of Australia

Joseph Aloysius Lyons was an Australian politician who served as the 10th Prime Minister of Australia, in office from 1932 until his death in 1939. He began his career in the Labor Party, but became the founding leader of the United Australia Party (UAP) after the 1931 party split. He had earlier served as Premier of Tasmania from 1923 to 1928.

James Scullin Australian politician, ninth Prime Minister of Australia

James Henry Scullin was an Australian Labor Party politician and the ninth Prime Minister of Australia. Scullin led Labor to government at the 1929 election. The Wall Street Crash of 1929 transpired just two days after his swearing in, which would herald the beginning of the Great Depression in Australia. Scullin's administration would soon be overwhelmed by the economic crisis, with interpersonal and policy disagreements causing a three-way split of his party that would bring down the government in late 1931. Despite his chaotic term of office, Scullin remained a leading figure in the Labor movement throughout his lifetime, and served as an éminence grise in various capacities for the party until his retirement in 1949.

Ted Theodore Australian politician

Edward Granville Theodore, nicknamed Red Ted, was an Australian politician who served as Premier of Queensland from 1919 to 1925, as leader of the state Labor Party. He later entered federal politics, serving as Treasurer in the Labor Scullin Government.

He was re-elected as an independent with the support of the Emergency Committee of South Australia at the 1931 federal election. [1] In 1932, he moved a bill to reduce parliamentary salaries to £600, which while opposed by the vast majority of MPs, caused Minister for Commerce Charles Hawker to resign from the ministry in order to vote for the bill. [12] Gabb's seat of Angas was abolished in a redistribution prior to the 1934 election, at which he retired. [1]

The Emergency Committee of South Australia was the major anti-Labor grouping in South Australia at the 1931 federal election.

1931 Australian federal election general election

The 1931 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 19 December 1931. All 75 seats in the House of Representatives and 18 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election.

Charles Hawker Australian politician

Charles Allan Seymour Hawker was an Australian politician. He was a member of the Australian House of Representatives for Wakefield from 1929 until his accidental death in 1938, representing the Nationalist Party (1929–1931) and its successor the United Australia Party (1931–1938). He was Minister for Repatriation and Minister for Markets in the Lyons government from 1931 to 1932.

Later life and death

After losing his seat in 1925, he was secretary of the South Australian branch of the Federated Gas Employees' Industrial Union until he regained the seat in 1929. [13] [14] He contested the 1938 state election as an independent, nominating against Premier Richard Layton Butler in his seat of Light, but was unsuccessful. [15] Gabb rarely listened to radio coverage of politics in later years because he felt broadcasting was bringing Parliament into disrepute. [8] He remained publicly critical of parliamentary salary increases in later life, accusing politicians of "feathering their nests". [16] He committed suicide at his Rosewater home in 1951, and was cremated. [13] [17]

1938 South Australian state election South Australian general election held in 1938

State elections were held in South Australia on 19 March 1938. All 39 seats in the South Australian House of Assembly were up for election. The incumbent Liberal and Country League government led by Premier of South Australia Richard L. Butler defeated the opposition Australian Labor Party led by Leader of the Opposition Andrew Lacey.

Richard Layton Butler Australian politician

Sir Richard Layton Butler KCMG was the 31st Premier of South Australia, serving two disjunct terms in office: from 1927 to 1930, and again from 1933 to 1938.

Electoral district of Light state electoral district of South Australia

Light is a single-member electoral district for the South Australian House of Assembly. As its area overlaps or is adjacent to the south western portion of the Light Regional Council and the south bank of the Light River, it is indirectly named after Colonel William Light, the first Surveyor-General of South Australia. The electorate was created in 1857, abolished at the 1902 election and recreated at the 1938 election. It is based on the semi-rural township of Gawler, and stretches southwards into the outermost northern suburbs of Adelaide.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Lloyd, C.J. "Gabb, Joel Moses". Australian Dictionary of Biography. National Centre of Biography.
  2. "MR. J. M. GABB". The Daily Herald . 8 (2476). Adelaide. 26 February 1918. p. 6. Retrieved 17 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  3. "Mr. Moses Gabb Dead". The Border Watch . 90 (10, 278). South Australia. 8 March 1951. p. 14. Retrieved 17 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  4. 1 2 "MR. GABB WAS ONCE MISSIONARY". The Observer . LXXXVI (4, 504). South Australia. 19 October 1929. p. 43. Retrieved 17 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  5. "MOSES GABB". The Mail . 11 (545). Adelaide. 21 October 1922. p. 2. Retrieved 17 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  6. 1 2 "Candid Comment". The Sunday Herald (111). New South Wales. 11 March 1951. p. 2. Retrieved 17 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  7. "SOUTH AUSTRALIA". The West Australian . XXXV (5, 527). 25 December 1919. p. 5. Retrieved 17 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  8. 1 2 "Mr. Moses Gabb, ex-MHR". The News . 56 (8, 604). Adelaide. 6 March 1951. p. 1. Retrieved 17 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  9. "MR. MOSES GABB". Cootamundra Herald . New South Wales. 11 February 1931. p. 1. Retrieved 17 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  10. "FROM THE GALLERY". The Sydney Morning Herald (29, 146). 4 June 1931. p. 8. Retrieved 17 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  11. ""LET ME ACT AS MUSSOLINI"". Kalgoorlie Miner . 37 (9821). Western Australia. 23 May 1931. p. 5. Retrieved 17 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  12. "HAWKER'S WORD WAS HIS BOND". The Sun (7093). Sydney. 23 September 1932. p. 10 (FINAL EXTRA). Retrieved 17 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  13. 1 2 "Former M.H.R. Found Dead". The Advertiser . 93 (28, 831). Adelaide. 7 March 1951. p. 3. Retrieved 17 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  14. "Death of Mr. J. M. Gabb". The Barrier Miner . LXIV (17, 403). New South Wales. 6 March 1951. p. 12. Retrieved 17 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  15. "PREMIER TO CONTEST LIGHT SEAT AGAINST FOUR MEN MR. MOSES GABB SEEKS TO ENTER ASSEMBLY". The Recorder (12, 130). South Australia. 24 February 1938. p. 1. Retrieved 17 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  16. "Moses Gabb Hits Out At Politicians". The Mail . 36 (1, 846). Adelaide. 11 October 1947. p. 2. Retrieved 17 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  17. "Family Notices". The Advertiser . 93 (28, 832). Adelaide. 8 March 1951. p. 18. Retrieved 17 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.
Parliament of Australia
Preceded by
Paddy Glynn
Member for Angas
1919–1925
Succeeded by
Walter Parsons
Preceded by
Walter Parsons
Member for Angas
1929–1934
Division abolished