Mount McGuire (Cascade Range)

Last updated
Mount McGuire
Mt. McGuire.jpg
Mt. McGuire, north aspect
Highest point
Elevation 2,008 m (6,588 ft) [1]
Prominence 465 m (1,526 ft) [1]
Parent peak Canadian Border Peak [1]
Coordinates 49°02′01″N121°46′23″W / 49.03361°N 121.77306°W / 49.03361; -121.77306 Coordinates: 49°02′01″N121°46′23″W / 49.03361°N 121.77306°W / 49.03361; -121.77306
Geography
Canada British Columbia relief location map.jpg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Mount McGuire
Location in British Columbia
Relief map of Canada.png
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Mount McGuire
Mount McGuire (Canada)
Location British Columbia, Canada
Parent range Skagit Range
North Cascades
Topo map NTS 92H/4
Geology
Mountain type Intrusive
Type of rock Limestone
Volcanic arc/belt Pemberton Volcanic Belt
Climbing
First ascent 1906 by James J. McArthur [2]  
Easiest route Scrambling

Mount McGuire is a 2,008-metre (6,588-foot) mountain summit located in the Cascade Mountains of southwestern British Columbia, Canada. It is situated 4 km (2 mi) north of the Canada–United States border, 19 km (12 mi) southeast of Chilliwack, and 7.4 km (5 mi) northwest of Canadian Border Peak, which is its nearest higher peak. [3] Precipitation runoff from the peak drains into tributaries of the Chilliwack River. The steep western slope of the peak plunges 1800 metres into Tamihi Creek. The mountain was originally known as Tamihi, a Halkomelem name that means "deformed baby finishes." Such infants were sometimes left exposed on the mountain to die. [2] [4] The mountain's name was labelled on 1917 map as McGuire, and officially adopted on October 6, 1936, by the Geographical Names Board of Canada. [5] The peak was first climbed in 1906 by James J. McArthur and survey party via the Southeast Ridge. [2]

Contents

Geology

Mount McGuire is related to the Chilliwack batholith, which intruded the region 26 to 29 million years ago after the major orogenic episodes in the region. This is part of the Pemberton Volcanic Belt, an eroded volcanic belt that formed as a result of subduction of the Farallon Plate starting 29 million years ago. [6] [7] [8]

During the Pleistocene period dating back over two million years ago, glaciation advancing and retreating repeatedly scoured the landscape leaving deposits of rock debris. [9] The "U"-shaped cross section of the river valleys are a result of recent glaciation. Uplift and faulting in combination with glaciation have been the dominant processes which have created the tall peaks and deep valleys of the North Cascades area.

The North Cascades features some of the most rugged topography in the Cascade Range with craggy peaks and ridges, deep glacial valleys, and granite spires. Geological events occurring many years ago created the diverse topography and drastic elevation changes over the Cascade Range leading to various climate differences which lead to vegetation variety defining the ecoregions in this area.

Climate

Mount McGuire from north Mount McGuire nw aspect.jpg
Mount McGuire from north

Based on the Köppen climate classification, Mount McGuire is located in the marine west coast climate zone of western North America. [10] Most weather fronts originate in the Pacific Ocean, and travel east toward the Cascade Range where they are forced upward by the range (Orographic lift), causing them to drop their moisture in the form of rain or snowfall. As a result, the Cascade Mountains experience high precipitation, especially during the winter months in the form of snowfall. Temperatures can drop below −20 °C with wind chill factors below −30 °C. The months July through September offer the most favorable weather for climbing McGuire.

Climbing Routes

Mt. McGuire's south aspect Mount McGuire 1994.jpg
Mt. McGuire's south aspect

Established rock climbing routes on Mount McGuire: [1]

See also

Related Research Articles

Canadian Border Peak mountain in Canada

Canadian Border Peak, 2,291 metres (7,516 ft), originally known simply as Border Peak, is a mountain at the head of Slesse Creek in the Cascade Mountains of the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, Canada. As its name suggests, it is near the Canada–US border and is connected via a high ridge or col to American Border Peak, which is slightly higher at 2,437 metres (7,995 ft). The two together are known as the Border Peaks or American-Canadian Border Peaks and are most easily visible within nearby settled parts of Canada from the northern part of Sumas Prairie and the western part of Chilliwack Prairie in the area of Greendale, which is just east of the boundary between the cities of Chilliwack and Abbotsford.

Mount Redoubt (Washington) mountain in United States of America

Mount Redoubt is a mountain in the North Cascades range in Whatcom County, Washington state. The peak is located 3.0 miles (5 km) to the Canada–US border, 16.3 miles (26 km) east-northeast of Mount Shuksan. It is the 21st highest peak in the state, with a height of 8,956 feet (2,730 m) and a prominence of 1,649 feet (503 m). Redoubt is in the Skagit Range, a sub-range of the North Cascades, in the Custer-Chilliwack Group which includes Mount Spickard, Mount Redoubt, Mount Custer and Mox Peaks, among others. Redoubt, Bear, and Depot creeks drain off the mountain, which is composed of Skagit gneiss. Mount Redoubt is listed as one of the "Classic Eight Peaks" in the North Cascades.

Silvertip Mountain mountain in British Columbia, Canada

Silvertip Mountain is an 2,596 m (8,517 ft) peak in the Canadian Cascades south of Hope, British Columbia (BC). It lies on the northern boundary of Skagit Valley Provincial Park. With a prominence of 1,871 m (6,138 ft), it is one of the fifty most prominent peaks in Canada. The mountain's name was officially adopted on December 2, 1948, by the Geographical Names Board of Canada. The peak was first climbed in 1908 by a Boundary Survey party.

Hinkhouse Peak mountain in Washington, United States of America

Hinkhouse Peak is a 7,560-foot (2,300-metre) mountain summit located on the shared border of Okanogan County and Chelan County in Washington state. It is part of the Okanogan Range which is a sub-range of the North Cascades Range. Hinkhouse Peak is situated on land administered by Okanogan National Forest. The nearest higher peak is Liberty Bell Mountain, 1.52 miles (2.45 km) to the south. Hinkhouse Peak is situated north of Washington Pass, at the east end of a high ridge which connects to Cutthroat Peak. A high ridge extending southeast connects it to Constitution Crags. Most precipitation runoff from the peak drains into Early Winters Creek which is a tributary of the Methow River, but the south slope drains into a tributary of the Chelan River.

Round Mountain (Washington) mountain in Cascade Range in Washington, USA

Round Mountain is a 5,320+ ft mountain summit at the western edge of the North Cascades, in Skagit County of Washington state. It is located nine miles northwest of Darrington, Washington and is situated on land administered by the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Round Mountain is remarkable for its 4780 feet of prominence which ranks as the most in Skagit County, and eighth most of all the mountains in Washington state. The nearest higher peak is Whitehorse Mountain, 7.85 miles (12.63 km) to the south-southeast. Precipitation runoff from Round Mountain drains into tributaries of the Stillaguamish River.

Bear Mountain (North Cascades)

Bear Mountain is a remote 7,931-foot (2,417-metre) mountain summit in the Skagit Range of the North Cascades of Washington state. Bear Mountain is situated in North Cascades National Park. Its nearest higher peak is Mount Redoubt, 2.36 mi (3.80 km) to the northeast. Precipitation runoff from Bear Mountain drains into Bear Creek and Indian Creek, both tributaries of the Chilliwack River. Access, either by the Chilliwack River Trail or from British Columbia, Canada, is difficult and takes two to three days.

Mineral Mountain (Washington)

Mineral Mountain is a 6,800-foot (2,100-metre) mountain summit in the Skagit Range of the North Cascades of Washington state. Mineral Mountain is situated in North Cascades National Park and the summit offers views of Mount Shuksan, Icy Peak, and the Picket Range. Its nearest higher peak is Ruth Mountain, 3.06 mi (4.92 km) to the west. Precipitation runoff from Mineral Mountain finds its way north into the Chilliwack River, and south into the Baker River.

Dorado Needle

Dorado Needle is an 8,440+ ft mountain summit located in North Cascades National Park in Skagit County of Washington state. The peak lies 0.73 miles north of Eldorado Peak and 1.33 mi (2.14 km) southeast of Perdition Peak. It can be seen from the North Cascades Highway west of Marblemount at a road pullout along the Skagit River. The first ascent of the peak was made in July 1940 by Lloyd Anderson, Karl Boyer, and Tom Gorton via the Northwest Ridge. Precipitation runoff and glacier meltwater from the mountain drains into tributaries of the Skagit River.

Nodoubt Peak

Nodoubt Peak is a remote 7,290-foot (2,220-metre) mountain summit in the Skagit Range of the North Cascades of Washington state. Nodoubt Peak is situated in North Cascades National Park, 2.2 kilometres south of the Canada–United States border. Its nearest higher peak is Canuck Peak, 1.43 mi (2.30 km) to the southeast, and Mount Redoubt rises 3.04 mi (4.89 km) also to the southeast of Nodoubt. Nodoubt Peak was named by a group of geologists who climbed the peak in 1967. Its name is a word play on Mount Redoubt's name. Precipitation runoff from Nodoubt Peak drains into tributaries of the Chilliwack River.

Cathedral Peak (Washington)

Cathedral Peak is an 8,606-foot (2,623-metre) mountain summit located in Okanogan County in Washington state. It is part of the Okanogan Range which is a sub-range of the North Cascades. The mountain is situated in the Pasayten Wilderness, on land administered by Okanogan National Forest. The nearest higher peak is Grimface Mountain, 2.6 miles (4.2 km) to the north in Cathedral Provincial Park in Canada. The Pacific Northwest Trail traverses below the south slope of Cathedral Peak as it crosses Cathedral Pass. Less than a mile to the opposite side of the pass stands Amphitheater Mountain. Precipitation runoff from Cathedral Peak drains west into Cathedral Fork, or east into Cathedral Creek.

Mount Rexford

Mount Rexford is a prominent 2,329-metre (7,641-foot) mountain summit located in the Cascade Mountains of southwestern British Columbia, Canada. It is situated 3.5 km (2 mi) north of the Canada–United States border, 7 km (4 mi) west of Chilliwack Lake, and 5.5 km (3 mi) east of Slesse Mountain, which is its nearest higher peak. Precipitation runoff from the peak drains into Nesakwatch and Centre Creeks, both tributaries of the Chilliwack River. Originally known as Ensawkwatch, the mountain was named for an early settler in the area, Rexford, who had a cabin near Slesse Creek and had trap lines in the vicinity. The mountain has two subsidiary peaks known as the Nesakwatch Spires. The mountain's name was officially adopted on June 2, 1950, by the Geographical Names Board of Canada. Mount Rexford was first climbed in July 1951 by Herman Genschorek and Walt Sparling via the West Ridge.

Thar Peak

Thar Peak is a 1,940-metre (6,360-foot) mountain summit located in the Coquihalla Summit Recreation Area, in the North Cascades of southwestern British Columbia, Canada. It is situated at the east end of Zopkios Ridge, immediately west of the Falls Lake exit at Coquihalla Summit, and 1.55 km (1 mi) east of Yak Peak. Due to its close proximity to the Coquihalla Highway, the mountain attracts skiers to its slopes in winter. Precipitation runoff from the peak drains into tributaries of the Coquihalla River. The mountain was named for the thar, a Himalayan animal, and part of the ungulate names theme for several other nearby peaks that were submitted by Philip Kubik of Vancouver. The mountain's name was officially adopted on February 5, 1976, by the Geographical Names Board of Canada.

Vicuna Peak

Vicuna Peak, or Vicuña Peak, is a 2,126-metre (6,975-foot) granitic horn located in the North Cascades of southwestern British Columbia, Canada. It is situated 8 km (5 mi) northwest of Coquihalla Summit, 1.47 km (1 mi) northeast of Alpaca Peak, and 1 km (1 mi) southwest of Guanaco Peak, its nearest higher peak, by a mere one metre. Precipitation runoff from the peak drains west into headwaters of the East Anderson River, or east into headwaters of the Coldwater River. The mountain was named for the vicuña, as part of the animal names theme for several other nearby peaks that were submitted by Philip Kubik of the 1974 first ascent party. The mountain's name was officially adopted on February 5, 1976, by the Geographical Names Board of Canada.

Guanaco Peak

Guanaco Peak is a 2,127-metre (6,978-foot) mountain located in the North Cascades of southwestern British Columbia, Canada. It is the highest summit of the Anderson River Group, a subset of the North Cascades. It is situated 8 km (5 mi) northwest of Coquihalla Summit, and 1 km (1 mi) northeast of Vicuna Peak. Precipitation runoff from the peak drains west into headwaters of the East Anderson River, or east into headwaters of the Coldwater River. The mountain was named for the guanaco, as part of the animal names theme for several other nearby peaks that were submitted by Philip Kubik of the 1974 first ascent party. The mountain's name was officially adopted on February 5, 1976, by the Geographical Names Board of Canada.

Steinbok Peak

Steinbok Peak, is a 2,012-metre (6,601-foot) granitic summit located in the North Cascades of southwestern British Columbia, Canada. It is situated 12 km (7 mi) west-northwest of Coquihalla Summit, 1.3 km (1 mi) northwest of Gamuza Peak, and 1 km (1 mi) southeast of Ibex Peak, its nearest higher peak. Precipitation runoff from the peak drains into tributaries of the Anderson River. The mountain was named for the steinbok, as part of the ungulate names theme for several other nearby peaks that were submitted by Philip Kubik of Vancouver. The mountain's name was officially adopted on February 5, 1976, by the Geographical Names Board of Canada. Steinbok was used to represent Kichatna Spire in the 1991 movie K2.

Ibex Peak (British Columbia)

Ibex Peak, is a 2,039-metre (6,690-foot) granitic horn located in the North Cascades of southwestern British Columbia, Canada. It is situated 13 km (8 mi) west-northwest of Coquihalla Summit, and 1 km (1 mi) northwest of Steinbok Peak. Its nearest higher peak is Alpaca Peak, 6.2 km (4 mi) to the east. Precipitation runoff from the peak drains into tributaries of the Anderson River. The mountain was named for the ibex, as part of the ungulate theme for several other nearby peaks that were submitted by Philip Kubik of Vancouver. The mountain's name was officially adopted on February 5, 1976, by the Geographical Names Board of Canada.

Alpaca Peak

Alpaca Peak is a 2,083-metre (6,834-foot) granitic mountain located in the North Cascades of southwestern British Columbia, Canada. It is situated 8 km (5 mi) northwest of Coquihalla Summit, and 1.47 km (1 mi) southwest of Vicuna Peak, its nearest higher peak. Precipitation runoff from the peak drains west into headwaters of the East Anderson River, or east into headwaters of the Coldwater River. The mountain was named for the alpaca, as part of the ungulate names theme for several other nearby peaks that were submitted by Philip Kubik of the 1965 first ascent party. The mountain's name was officially adopted on March 23, 1976, by the Geographical Names Board of Canada.

Gemse Peak

Gemse Peak, is a 1,890-metre (6,200-foot) granitic horn located in the North Cascades of southwestern British Columbia, Canada. It is situated 12 km (7 mi) west-northwest of Coquihalla Summit, 3.5 km (2 mi) west of Alpaca Peak, and 2.5 km (2 mi) northeast of Steinbok Peak. Precipitation runoff from the peak drains into tributaries of the Anderson River. The mountain was named for the gemse, the chamois of Germany, as part of the ungulate names theme for several other nearby peaks that were submitted by Philip Kubik of the 1974 first ascent party. The mountain's name was officially adopted on February 5, 1976, by the Geographical Names Board of Canada.

Gamuza Peak

Gamuza Peak, is a 1,944-metre (6,378-foot) granitic mountain summit located in the North Cascades of southwestern British Columbia, Canada. It is situated 12 km (7 mi) west-northwest of Coquihalla Summit, and its nearest higher peak is Steinbok Peak, 1.3 km (1 mi) to the northwest. Precipitation runoff from the peak drains into tributaries of the Anderson River. The mountain was named for the gamuza, the Spanish name for the Pyrenean chamois, as part of the ungulate theme for several other nearby peaks that were submitted by Philip Kubik of the first ascent party. The mountain's name was officially adopted on February 5, 1976, by the Geographical Names Board of Canada.

Needle Peak (British Columbia)

Needle Peak is a prominent 2,095-metre (6,873-foot) mountain summit located in the Coquihalla Summit Recreation Area, in the North Cascades of southwestern British Columbia, Canada. It is situated immediately southwest of Coquihalla Summit, and 4.2 km (3 mi) south-southwest of Yak Peak. Due to its close proximity to the Coquihalla Highway, the mountain is a popular hiking destination in summer, and skiing and snowshoeing in winter. Precipitation runoff from the peak drains into tributaries of the Coquihalla River. The mountain's descriptive name was officially adopted on October 6, 1936, by the Geographical Names Board of Canada.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Mount McGuire". Bivouac.com. Retrieved 2019-11-22.
  2. 1 2 3 Fred Beckey, Cascade Alpine Guide, Volume 3 (Second Edition), The Mountaineers, 1995, ISBN   0-89886-423-2, p. 50
  3. "Mount McGuire, British Columbia". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2019-11-22.
  4. "Mount McGuire". BC Geographical Names.
  5. "Mount McGuire". Geographical Names Data Base. Natural Resources Canada . Retrieved 2019-11-04.
  6. Cenozoic to Recent plate configurations in the Pacific Basin: Ridge subduction and slab window magmatism in western North America
  7. Miocene peralkaline volcanism in west-central British Columbia - Its temporal and plate-tectonics setting
  8. Catalogue of Canadian volcanoes: Franklin Glacier Archived 2010-12-11 at the Wayback Machine
  9. Kruckeberg, Arthur (1991). The Natural History of Puget Sound Country. University of Washington Press.
  10. Peel, M. C.; Finlayson, B. L. & McMahon, T. A. (2007). "Updated world map of the Köppen−Geiger climate classification". Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. 11. ISSN   1027-5606.