Mount Silverthrone (Alaska)

Last updated
Mount Silverthrone
Mount Silverthrone, Alaska Range.jpg
Mount Silverthrone from the north
Highest point
Elevation 13,220 ft (4,030 m) [1]
Prominence 3,240 ft (990 m) [1]
Listing
Coordinates 63°06′56.9″N150°40′34.7″W / 63.115806°N 150.676306°W / 63.115806; -150.676306 Coordinates: 63°06′56.9″N150°40′34.7″W / 63.115806°N 150.676306°W / 63.115806; -150.676306
Geography
Parent range Alaska Range
Topo map USGS Denali A-2
Climbing
First ascent 1945, Norman Bright and Frank P. Foster

Mount Silverthrone is 13,220 ft (4,030 m) glaciated mountain summit located in Denali National Park and Preserve, in the Alaska Range, in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is situated 10.8 mi (17 km) east of Denali. The first ascent of this peak was made April 12, 1945, by Norman Bright and Frank P. Foster. It was so named by the U.S. Army Forces Cold Weather test party because of its stately appearance at the head of Brooks Glacier. [2]

Contents

Climate

Based on the Köppen climate classification, Mount Silverthrone is located in a subarctic climate zone with long, cold, snowy winters, and cool summers. [3] Temperatures can drop below −20 °C with wind chill factors below −30 °C. This climate supports glaciers on it slopes including the Brooks Glacier. Precipitation runoff from the mountain drains into tributaries of the McKinley River, which in turn is part of in the Tanana River drainage basin. The months May through June offer the most favorable weather for climbing or viewing.

See also

View of Alska Range from the Eielson Visitor Center, Denali Nation Park.jpg

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Mount Shand

Mount Shand is a 12,660 ft (3,860 m) elevation glaciated summit located at the head of the Trident Glacier in the eastern Alaska Range, in Alaska, United States. It is the third-highest peak in the Hayes Range, a subset of the Alaska Range. This remote peak is situated 9.8 mi (16 km) east-southeast of Mount Hayes, and 93 mi (150 km) southeast of Fairbanks. Mount Moffit, the nearest higher neighbor, is set 2.3 mi (4 km) to the northeast, and McGinnis Peak is positioned 4.5 mi (7 km) to the east. This rarely climbed mountain has three large sweeping faces, the East, West, and South.

Mount Healy

Mount Healy, also known in Denaʼina language as Dlel Neelghu Nodaadlghunee, is a 5,716-foot elevation mountain summit located in the Alaska Range, in Denali National Park and Preserve, in Alaska, United States. It is situated immediately northwest of park headquarters and 6 mi (10 km) south of Healy. The George Parks Highway and Alaska Railroad traverse the eastern base of this mountain as each passes through the Nenana River Gorge. Mount Healy's nearest neighbor, Sugar Loaf Mountain, is set 5.2 mi (8 km) to the east across the gorge, and the nearest higher peak is Fang Mountain, 16.2 mi (26 km) to the south-southwest. Mount Healy is a nine-mile-long, east–west trending ridge system of mostly loose rock with jagged peaks and spires. Vegetation ranges from boreal forest at the base all the way up to barren alpine ridges and snowfields at the top. This area is very popular for day hikes due to its close proximity to the park entrance. This mountain and the town are named after John J. Healy (1840–1908), manager of the North American Trading and Transportation Company. This geographical feature's name was reported in 1921 by Mabry Abbey on his survey map of the boundaries of Mount McKinley National Park.

References

  1. 1 2 "Mount Silverthrone". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2020-04-24.
  2. Dictionary of Alaska Place Names, Donald J. Orth author, United States Government Printing Office (1967), page 875.
  3. Peel, M. C.; Finlayson, B. L.; McMahon, T. A. (2007). "Updated world map of the Köppen−Geiger climate classification". Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. 11. ISSN   1027-5606.