Mount Sniktau

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Mount Sniktau
Mt Sniktau from the SW.jpg
Mount Sniktau viewed from Point 13152.
Highest point
Elevation 13,240 ft (4,036 m) [1] [2]
Prominence 520 ft (158 m) [2]
Isolation 2.41 mi (3.88 km) [2]
Coordinates 39°40′42″N105°51′28″W / 39.6783202°N 105.8577885°W / 39.6783202; -105.8577885 Coordinates: 39°40′42″N105°51′28″W / 39.6783202°N 105.8577885°W / 39.6783202; -105.8577885 [3]
Geography
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Mount Sniktau
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Mount Sniktau
Mount Sniktau (the United States)
Location Clear Creek County, Colorado, U.S. [3]
Parent range Front Range [2]
Topo map USGS 7.5' topographic map
Grays Peak, Colorado [3]
Climbing
Easiest route Trail hike

Mount Sniktau is a high mountain summit in the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 13,240-foot (4,036 m) thirteener is located in Arapaho National Forest, 1.6 miles (2.5 km) northeast (bearing 48°) of Loveland Pass in Clear Creek County, Colorado, United States. [1] [2] [3]

Contents

Name

The name "Sniktau" refers to the pen name of Edwin H. N. Patterson, a journalist in the Clear Creek County area during the 1860s. [4] Patterson was a close friend of the famous poet, Edgar Allan Poe, and the two men are known to have exchanged letters in the 1840s. [5]

Patterson claimed to have received the nickname "Sniktau" from Native Americans, although it may simply have been adopted from a fellow journalist named W. F. Watkins, who had reversed the letters of his own name to create the pen name "Sniktaw." [5] Patterson had moved to Colorado from his native Oquawka, Illinois, in 1875 to become editor of the Colorado Miner, a newspaper printed in Georgetown, roughly 15 miles from the mountain. He is buried in Alvarado Cemetery, located near Georgetown. [5]

Location and geography

Mount Sniktau sits immediately east of the Continental Divide on the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. The summit is located less than a mile south of Interstate 70 and east of the Eisenhower Tunnel. [6] The larger Grays Peak, Torreys Peak, and Mount Parnassus sit within a 5-mile (8 km) radius of Mount Sniktau, and the closest major town is Silver Plume. [6] [7] By car, Mount Sniktau sits within the Arapaho National Forest and is roughly one hour west of Denver. [8]

The mountain's immediate drainage basin is Clear Creek (Colorado) and then the South Platte River. Ultimately, runoff from the peak reaches the Platte River, the Missouri River, the Mississippi River and the Gulf of Mexico. [2]

Hiking

A hiker ascending the Mount Sniktau trail, with the mountain's south peak visible at center Mount Sniktau hiker.JPG
A hiker ascending the Mount Sniktau trail, with the mountain's south peak visible at center

The Mount Sniktau trail, which allows hikers to reach the summit of the mountain by foot, is accessible immediately off of a parking lot at Loveland Pass on U.S. Highway 6. [6] [8] The trailhead begins above the treeline at about 12,000 feet (3,660 m) and rises to 13,234 feet (4,034 m) at the peak, but reaching the summit does not necessarily require the use of extra mountain climbing equipment such as ropes. [4] Visitors can also reach Grizzly Peak, a nearby mountain (not to be confused with the taller Grizzly Peak in Chaffee County), from the same point along Loveland Pass. [8]

The walk from the trailhead at Loveland Pass to the peak measures about two miles, but it features an elevation gain of over 1,000 feet (300 m) in the initial mile of hiking. [9] [10] Because of its relatively convenient accessibility by automobile from population centers like Denver, Boulder, and Breckenridge, the mountain is a popular destination for hikers. [8]

The view from the Mount Sniktau trail of the Rocky Mountains and Loveland Pass View from Mount Sniktau trail.png
The view from the Mount Sniktau trail of the Rocky Mountains and Loveland Pass

From the summit, hikers see Loveland Pass below them at 11,990 ft (3,655 m), plus views of nearby Grizzly Peak, Grays Peak, Torreys Peak and the Gore Range. Also visible are the skiing runs of the adjacent Loveland Ski Area, as well as those of Arapahoe Basin, Keystone, and Breckenridge across the Divide in Summit County. [8] [9]

Proposed Olympic venue

When the International Olympic Committee awarded the 1976 Winter Olympics to Denver in May 1970, [11] [12] the local organizers' proposal included the development of Mount Sniktau as the primary venue for alpine ski racing for downhill and giant slalom, with slalom at Loveland Ski Area. [13] [14] By early 1972, it was decided to move the alpine events to Vail because the proposals did not meet the Olympic standards. [15] [16] In November 1972, Colorado voters rejected public funding for the Olympics, [17] [18] and the Games were soon relocated to Innsbruck, Austria. [19]

Historical names

See also

Related Research Articles

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History of Rocky Mountain National Park began when Paleo-Indians traveled along what is now Trail Ridge Road to hunt and forage for food. Ute and Arapaho people subsequently hunted and camped in the area. In 1820, the Long Expedition, led by Stephen H. Long for whom Longs Peak was named, approached the Rockies via the Platte River. Settlers began arriving in the mid-1800s, displacing the Native Americans who mostly left the area voluntarily by 1860, while others were removed to reservations by 1878.

References

  1. 1 2 The elevation of Mount Sniktau includes an adjustment of +1.837 m (+6.03 ft) from NGVD 29 to NAVD 88.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Mount Sniktau, Colorado". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 "Mount Sniktau". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  4. 1 2 "Mount Sniktau Trail". Colorado Hiking. Trails.com/REI. Retrieved 30 November 2012.
  5. 1 2 3 "Edwin Howard Norton Patterson". People. Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore. Retrieved 30 November 2012.
  6. 1 2 3 "Mount Sniktau". Climbing, Hiking and Mountaineering. SummitPost.org. Retrieved 30 November 2012.
  7. "13ers.com - Mount Sniktau" . Retrieved 2012-11-30.
  8. 1 2 3 4 5 "Mount Sniktau". hikingincolorado.org. Hiking in Colorado. Retrieved 30 November 2012.
  9. 1 2 "Mt. Sniktau". Hiking trails. Summit County Explorer. Retrieved 30 November 2012.
  10. Surfer, Mike. "Mount Sniktau". PeakWare - Peaks. Interactive Outdoors, Inc. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 30 November 2012.
  11. "Denver and Montreal awarded 1976 Olympic Games". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). Associated Press. May 13, 1970. p. 13.
  12. "Denver, Montreal shock Olympic site hopefuls". Deseret News. (Salt Lake City, Utah). UPI. May 13, 1970. p. 1D.
  13. Rapaport, Roger (February 15, 1971). "Olympian snafu at Sniktau". Sports Illustrated: 60.
  14. "The Denver That Never Was: 1976 Winter Olympic Games". Denver Public Library. August 2013. Archived from the original on December 28, 2013. Retrieved December 27, 2013.
  15. "Way cleared for '76 Games as Denver changes okayed". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. February 1, 1972. p. 2B.
  16. "Olympic notes: Appeal on Schranz rejected". Pittsburgh Press. UPI. February 1, 1972. p. 30.
  17. "Winter Olympics out in Colorado". Deseret News. (Salt Lake City, Utah). UPI. November 8, 1972. p. A4.
  18. "Voters reject 'privilege'". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. November 8, 1972. p. 1C.
  19. "Denver Defers the 1976 Games" (PDF). Ski Museum.net. p. 2. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 May 2014. Retrieved 12 May 2014. ...1976 Winter Games, they were originally awarded to Denver.