Mount Thrace

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Mount Thrace ( 77°30′S161°7′E / 77.500°S 161.117°E / -77.500; 161.117 Coordinates: 77°30′S161°7′E / 77.500°S 161.117°E / -77.500; 161.117 ) is a peak rising to 1800 m at the southeast side of Mount Boreas, Olympus Range, in the McMurdo Dry Valleys. It is connected by a ridge to the Mount Boreas massif. In association with the names of figures in Greek mythology grouped in the range, named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) (2004) after Thrace, legendary home of Boreas (Mount Boreas, q.v.).

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Mount Boreas is a prominent peak, 2,180 metres (7,150 ft) high, between Mount Aeolus and Mount Dido in the Olympus Range of Victoria Land. It was named by the Victoria University of Wellington Antarctic Expedition (1958–59) for Boreas, a figure in Greek mythology.

Olympus Range is a primarily ice-free mountain range of Victoria Land with peaks over 2,000 metres (6,600 ft), between Victoria and McKelvey Valleys on the north and Wright Valley on the south. Mapped by the Victoria University of Wellington Antarctic Expedition (VUWAE), 1958–59, and named for the mythological home of the Greek gods. Peaks in the range are named for figures in Greek mythology.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Mount Thrace" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

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Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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