Mount Troubridge

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Mount Troubridge ( 71°8′S167°44′E / 71.133°S 167.733°E / -71.133; 167.733 Coordinates: 71°8′S167°44′E / 71.133°S 167.733°E / -71.133; 167.733 ) is a mountain over 1,000 m, surmounting the east end of Hedgpeth Heights in the Anare Mountains. Discovered and rudely charted in January 1841 by Captain James Ross, Royal Navy, who named it for R. Admiral Sir Edward Thomas Troubridge, one of the junior lords of the Admiralty at that time.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Mountain A large landform that rises fairly steeply above the surrounding land over a limited area

A mountain is a large landform that rises above the surrounding land in a limited area, usually in the form of a peak. A mountain is generally steeper than a hill. Mountains are formed through tectonic forces or volcanism. These forces can locally raise the surface of the earth. Mountains erode slowly through the action of rivers, weather conditions, and glaciers. A few mountains are isolated summits, but most occur in huge mountain ranges.

The Hedgpeth Heights are mainly snow-covered heights, 14 nautical miles (26 km) long and with peaks rising to 1,300 metres (4,300 ft), located 2 nautical miles (4 km) southwest of the Quam Heights in the Anare Mountains of Victoria Land, Antarctica. The feature was first mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–63, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Joel W. Hedgpeth, a United States Antarctic Research Program biologist at McMurdo Station, 1967–68, and Palmer Station, 1968–69. These topographical features lie situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

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United States Geological Survey Scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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