Mourneview Park

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Mourneview Park
Mourneview Park 2020.jpg
Mourneview Park
LocationMourneview Avenue, Lurgan, County Armagh, Northern Ireland
Coordinates 54°27′14″N6°20′11″W / 54.45389°N 6.33639°W / 54.45389; -6.33639 Coordinates: 54°27′14″N6°20′11″W / 54.45389°N 6.33639°W / 54.45389; -6.33639
Owner Glenavon Football Club
Capacity 4,160 (safe capacity apx. 3,200)
Surface Grass
Opened1895 (1895)

Mourneview Park is a football stadium in Lurgan, County Armagh, Northern Ireland, and is the home ground of NIFL Premiership club Glenavon. The stadium holds 4,160 and was originally built in 1895. The 2008–09 Irish League Cup, 2010–11 Irish League Cup and 2020-21 Irish Cup finals were held at the stadium. [1]

Contents

History

Between 1992 and 2011, Mourneview Park underwent a number of significant renovations, including the building of three new seated stands. [2] Mourneview Park has been used by the Irish Football Association to host neutral matches in the past. In 2003, the Irish Football Association removed Mourneview Park as a potential semi-final host for the Irish Cup because of rioting between fans of Glentoran and Portadown. [3] Mourneview Park has previously been attacked by arsonists, including in 2005 when a petrol bomb was thrown into a supporters club bar which destroyed it, leading to Glenavon considering closing Mourneview Park because of the continuous damage. [4] In 2009, it was selected to host the 2009 Irish League Cup final because neither of Belfast's Big Two made it to the final and it would have been harder for fans of finalists Newry City and Portadown to get to a Belfast venue. This was the same case for the 2011 Irish League Cup Final, with Mourneview Park being chosen because the finalists were Lisburn Distillery and Portadown, 2 of the closest Premiership clubs to Mourneview Park at that time. [5] The two League Cup finals held at Mourneview Park were the first to be staged outside of Belfast. [5]


In 2014, Mourneview Park was nominated by Belfast club Linfield to be their designated home ground for their home matches in the UEFA Europa League after their normal home ground, Windsor Park was undergoing redevelopment. [6]

Mourneview Park was chosen as the venue for the 2015 Irish Cup semi-final between Glentoran and Crusaders due to the unavailability of Windsor Park ahead of a Northern Ireland international fixture. The ground was further used for semi-finals in the 2016–17, 2018–19, and 2020-21 editions of the competition.

In September 2020, Glenavon FC unveiled a new 5m x 2m Digital LED Screen at Mourneview Park, which was supplied by FSL Scoreboards. It is the first of its kind anywhere in Ireland. [7]

On 12 April 2021, it was announced that Mourneview Park would be the host venue for the 2020–21 Irish Cup Final; the first time the final has been staged outside of Belfast since 1975. [8]

Although Glenavon failed to attain European qualification at the end of the 2020-21 Season, there would still be European football played in Mourneview Park, as it was announced on 15 June 2021 that Mourneview Park would host the second leg of the first round tie in the inaugural edition of the Europa Conference League between FK Velež Mostar and Coleraine F.C. on 15 July 2021, due to pitch redevelopments at The Showgrounds. [9]

International football

Mourneview Park has been used to host Northern Ireland national under-21 football team matches [10] as well as matches involving the Northern Ireland women's national football team. [11]

Other uses

Mourneview Park has also been used for purposes outside of football. in 2014 it hosted a Christian evangelical event hosted by former Northern Ireland national football team player turned minister, Stuart Elliott. [12]

Related Research Articles

Portadown F.C. Association football club in Northern Ireland

Portadown Football Club is a semi-professional, Northern Irish football club that plays in the NIFL Premiership.

Linfield F.C. Association football club in Northern Ireland

Linfield Football Club is a professional football club based in Belfast, Northern Ireland, which plays in the NIFL Premiership – the highest level of the Northern Ireland Football League. The club was founded in 1886 as Linfield Athletic Club and in 1905 moved into their current home of Windsor Park, which is also the home of the Northern Ireland national team. The club's badge displays Windsor Castle, in reference to the ground's namesake.

Glenavon F.C. Association football club in Northern Ireland

Glenavon Football Club is a semi-professional, Northern Irish football club playing in the NIFL Premiership. The club, founded in 1889, hails from Lurgan and plays its home matches at Mourneview Park. Club colours are blue and white. Gary Hamilton has been player-manager of the Lurgan Blues since December 2011 following the resignation of Marty Quinn. Glenavon's bitter rivals are Portadown, with their matches known as the 'Mid-Ulster Derby'.

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The 2013–14 NIFL Premiership was the sixth season of Northern Ireland's national football league in this format since its inception in 2008, the 113th season of Irish league football overall, and the first season of the league operating as part of the newly-created Northern Ireland Football League. The season began on 10 August 2013 and concluded on 26 April 2014.

The 2014–15 NIFL Premiership was the seventh season of Northern Ireland's highest national football league in this format since its inception in 2008, the 114th season of Irish league football overall, and the second season of the league operating as part of the Northern Ireland Football League. The season began on 9 August 2014, and concluded with the final round of fixtures on 25 April 2015.

The 2014–15 Irish Cup was the 135th edition of the premier knock-out cup competition in Northern Irish football since its introduction in 1881. The competition began on 23 August 2014 with the first round, and concluded on 2 May 2015 with the final. For the first time since 1995, the Oval was chosen as the final venue following the discovery of damage to a stand at Windsor Park during the stadium's redevelopment.

The 2015–16 Irish Cup was the 136th edition of the premier knock-out cup competition in Northern Irish football since its introduction in 1881. The competition began on 18 August 2015 with the first round and concluded with the final at Windsor Park on 7 May 2016. The cup was sponsored by Tennent's Lager, the competition's first title sponsor since 2012.

The 2018–19 NIFL Premiership was the 11th season of Northern Ireland's highest national football league in this format since its inception in 2008, the 118th season of Irish league football overall, and the sixth season of the league operating as part of the Northern Ireland Football League. The season began on 4 August 2018 and concluded on 27 April 2019, with the play-offs for promotion/relegation and the Europa League then taking place in May 2019.

The 2020–21 NIFL Premiership was the 13th season of Northern Ireland's highest national football league in this format since its inception in 2008, the 120th season of Irish league football overall, and the eighth season since the creation of the Northern Ireland Football League. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in Northern Ireland at the time meant that the start of the season was delayed by approximately two months. The 38-game season commenced on 16 October 2020 and concluded on 29 May 2021, with the European play-offs then taking place on 1 and 5 June 2021. The fixtures were released on 19 September 2020.

The 2020–21 Irish Cup was the 141st edition of the premier knock-out cup competition in Northern Irish football since its inauguration in 1881. The competition began on 27 April 2021 and concluded with the final at Mourneview Park, Lurgan on 21 May 2021.

References

  1. "Wright thinking back to senior glory days in bid for fans boost". 9 April 2014. Event occurs at Portadown Times. Archived from the original on 14 May 2014. Retrieved 13 May 2014.
  2. "Football: The Venues". The Free Library. 14 July 2005. Retrieved 13 May 2014.
  3. "Glenavon Await Mourn-Ing Call". The Free Library. 13 April 2003. Retrieved 13 May 2014.
  4. "Attack 'threatens club's future'". BBC News. 2 May 2005. Retrieved 13 May 2014.
  5. 1 2 "IFA Set to Take a 'View". Sunday Mirror.[ dead link ]
  6. "Linfield select Mourneview Park to stage Europa League tie". BBC Sport. Retrieved 13 May 2014.
  7. https://www.glenavonfc.com/2020/09/18/big-sign-ing-arrives-at-mourneview-park/ [ bare URL ]
  8. https://www.irishfa.com/news/2021/april/sadler-s-peaky-blinder-irish-cup-final-to-be-staged-in-lurgan/ [ bare URL ]
  9. https://colerainefc.com/bannsiders-to-bosnia/ [ bare URL ]
  10. "Euro 2015 qualifier: Northern Ireland U21 02 Italy U21". BBC Sport. 5 March 2014. Retrieved 13 May 2014.
  11. "NI women aim for qualification". BBC Sport. 23 April 2012. Archived from the original on 13 May 2014. Retrieved 13 May 2014.
  12. Beacom, Steven (8 May 2014). "God was always my goal in life, says Stuart Elliott". Belfast Telegraph. Retrieved 13 May 2014.