Movement of Militant Muslims

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Movement of Militant Muslims
جنبش مسلمانان مبارز
Leader Habibollah Payman
Founded 1977;41 years ago (1977)
Split from JAMA [1]
Preceded by Movement of God-Worshipping Socialists [2]
Newspaper Ommat [2]
Ideology Islamic socialism [2]
Social democracy [2]
Anti-imperialism [2]
Religion Islam
International affiliationNone
Parliament
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The Movement of Militant Muslims (Persian : جنبش مسلمانان مبارز) is an Iranian Islamic socialist political group led by Habibollah Payman. [2] The group had been revolutionary [2] and is close to Council of Nationalist-Religious Activists of Iran. [3]

Persian language Western Iranian language

Persian, also known by its endonym Farsi, is one of the Western Iranian languages within the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family. It is a pluricentric language primarily spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and some other regions which historically were Persianate societies and considered part of Greater Iran. It is written right to left in the Persian alphabet, a modified variant of the Arabic script.

Iran Country in Western Asia

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References

  1. Houchang E. Chehabi (1990). Iranian Politics and Religious Modernism: The Liberation Movement of Iran Under the Shah and Khomeini. I.B.Tauris. p. 272. ISBN   1850431981.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Muhammad Sahimi (12 May 2009). "The Political Groups". Tehran Bureau . Retrieved 21 August 2015.
  3. Buchta, Wilfried (2000), Who rules Iran?: the structure of power in the Islamic Republic, Washington DC: The Washington Institute for Near East Policy, The Konrad Adenauer Stiftung, p. 83, ISBN   0-944029-39-6