Mudiriyah

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Mudiriyah (Arabic : مديرية, plural Mudiriyat), meaning "directorate" (from مدير mudir, meaning "director"), is an administrative subdivision also known in English as mudirate, [1] and often translated as "province". [2] [3] It was used in Egypt and in Anglo-Egyptian Sudan. [1] The term was also used in Yemen. [4] The mudiriya were subdivided into markaz, or districts. [3] In modern Egypt, these subdivisions were replaced by governorates ( muhafazat ).

Egypt Country spanning North Africa and Southwest Asia

Egypt, officially the Arab Republic of Egypt, is a country spanning the northeast corner of Africa and southwest corner of Asia by a land bridge formed by the Sinai Peninsula. Egypt is a Mediterranean country bordered by the Gaza Strip and Israel to the northeast, the Gulf of Aqaba and the Red Sea to the east, Sudan to the south, and Libya to the west. Across the Gulf of Aqaba lies Jordan, across the Red Sea lies Saudi Arabia, and across the Mediterranean lie Greece, Turkey and Cyprus, although none share a land border with Egypt.

Anglo-Egyptian Sudan Joint British and Egyptian rule between 1899-1956

The Anglo-Egyptian Sudan was a condominium of the United Kingdom and Egypt in the eastern Sudan region of northern Africa between 1899 and 1956, but in practice the structure of the condominium ensured full British control over the Sudan with Egypt having local influence instead. It attained independence as the Republic of the Sudan, which since 2011 has been split into Sudan and South Sudan.

Yemen Republic in Western Asia


Yemen , officially the Republic of Yemen, is a country at the southern end of the Arabian Peninsula in Western Asia. Yemen is the second-largest Arab sovereign state in the peninsula, occupying 527,970 square kilometres. The coastline stretches for about 2,000 kilometres. It is bordered by Saudi Arabia to the north, the Red Sea to the west, the Gulf of Aden and Guardafui Channel to the south, and the Arabian Sea and Oman to the east. Yemen's territory includes more than 200 islands. Yemen is a member of the Arab League, United Nations, Non-Aligned Movement and the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation.

Notes

  1. 1 2 Nachtigal, Gustav (1971) Sahara and Sudan: Wadai and Darfur (Volume 4 of Sahara and Sudan) Hurst, London, page 413, OCLC   27836995
  2. Amery, Harold François Saphir (1905) English-Arabic vocabulary for the use of officials in the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan Intelligence Department, Egyptian Ministry of War, Al-Mokattam Printing Office, Cairo, page 435, OCLC   7582223
  3. 1 2 Johnson, Amy J. (2004) Reconstructing Rural Egypt: Ahmed Hussein and the history of Egyptian development Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, New York, page 281, ISBN   0-8156-3014-X
  4. Salmoni, Barak A.; Loidolt, Bryce and Wells, Madeleine (2010) Regime and periphery in Northern Yemen: the Huthi phenomenon (Rand Corporation monograph series, MG-962-DIA) Rand Corporation, Santa Monica, California, pages 81-82, ISBN   978-0-8330-4933-9

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