Mukund Lath

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Mukund Lath
Pranab Mukherjee presenting the Sangeet Natak Akademi Fellowship to Shri Mukund Lath, at the investiture ceremony of the Sangeet Natak Akademi Fellowships and Sangeet Natak Akademi Awards-2011, at Rashtrapati Bhavan.jpg
Pranab Mukherjee presenting the Sangeet Natak Akademi Fellowship to Shri Mukund Lath, at the investiture ceremony of the Sangeet Natak Akademi Fellowships and Sangeet Natak Akademi Awards-2011, at Rashtrapati Bhavan
Born(1937-10-09)9 October 1937
Died6 August 2020(2020-08-06) (aged 82) [1]
Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
Resting place Bombay
Occupation Cultural historian, scholar
Years active19662020
Awards Padma Shri
Sangeet Natak Akademi Fellowship
Sangeet Natak Akademi Award
Shankar Puraskar
Naresh Mehta Vangmaya Puraskar
WebsiteOfficial web site

Mukund Lath (9 October 1937 6 August 2020) was an Indian scholar and cultural historian, known for his writings on music, dance, aesthetics and culture of India. [2] [3] He was honored by the Government of India, in 2010, with the fourth highest Indian civilian award of Padma Shri. [4]

Contents

Biography

Mukund Lath was born on 9 October 1937 [5] in Kolkata in the Indian state of West Bengal. [2] After completing his senior cambridge, Lath graduated (BA Hons) in English literature from the University of Delhi. His master's degree (MA) was in Sanskrit literature from Jadavpur University in 1965. [3] Later he enrolled at Institute for Comparative Music Studies and Documentation, West Berlin for research on Dattilam, an ancient treatise on the music of India. Subsequently, he returned to India and secured a doctoral degree (PhD) on Dattilam from Delhi University in 1976. [2] [3] He also had training in classical music, during a period from 1966 to 1968, under Pandit Maniram and Ramesh Chakravarti and later, had training in the genre of Khayal Mewat Gharana under the guidance of Pandit Jasraj, [6] whom he has accompanied on many concert tours. [3] [5] Lath started his career at the University of Rajasthan by joining their Department of History and Indian Culture in 1973 where he worked till his retirement in 1997. [2] [3] [5] [6]

Mukund Lath has authored several books and articles. [7] [8] [9] [10] Some of his notable works are:

Lath's works have been subjected to critical studies [16] and many articles have been published in his honour. [17] [18] He has also published two translations of ancient Sanskrit and Prakrit poems into Hindi. [2]

Lath has taught as a visiting faculty at many universities around the world such as Oxford University, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium, University of Bamberg, Germany and Hebrew University of Jerusalem. [3] He has also delivered keynote addresses and lectures at many conferences and seminars and was a member of the Project of History of Indian Science, Philosophy and Culture, a Government of India initiative. [3] Mukund Lath is credited with evolving a new approach to cultural history and is known to have written on the history behind the musical instrument Tanpura and the relevance of Sarangi in Indian concerts. [6]

Awards and recognitions

Mukund Lath received Shankar Puraskar from K. K. Birla Foundation in 2000, for his work, Sangeet evam Chintan (Music and Thoughts). [2] He received another award, Naresh Mehta Vangmaya Puraskar, for the same work, from Madhya Pradesh Rashtrabhasha Prachar Samiti in 2003. [2] In 2008, he received the Sangeet Natak Akademi Award. [2] [19] Two years later, in 2010, the Government of India awarded him the civilian honour of Padma Shri. [2] [6] The Sangeet Natak Akademi honoured him again, in 2012, with their Fellowship of Sangeet Natak Akademi Ratna. [2] [3] [6]

See also

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References

  1. "Mukund Lath, prominent cultural historian and exponent of Mewati gharana, passes away at 82 - Living News , Firstpost". Firstpost. 6 August 2020. Retrieved 6 August 2020.
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  11. Mukund Lath (Author), Kapila Vatsyayan (Editor) (1988). Dattilam. Motilal Banarsidass. p. 256. ISBN   978-8120805866.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  12. Mukund Lath (1998). Transformation as Creation. Aditya Prakashan. p. 359. ISBN   978-8186471166.
  13. Winand M. Callewaert (Author), Mukund Lath (Author) (1989). Hindi Padavali of Namdev. Motilal Banarsidass. p. 438. ISBN   978-8120806078.
  14. Mukund Lath (Author), Ganesh Pyne (Illustration) (2005). The Ardhakathanaka - Half A Tale. Rupa and Co. p. 294. ISBN   978-8129105660.
  15. Daya Krishna; Mukund Lath; Francine E. Krishna (2000). Bhakthi - A Contemporary Discussion, Philosophical Explorations in the Indian Bhakti Tradition. Indian Council of Philosophical Research. pp.  257. ISBN   978-8185636443.
  16. Anandprakash Dikshit (1990). "THE HINDI PADĀVALĪ OF NĀMDEV". Annals of the Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute. 71 (1/4): 333–335. JSTOR   41693536.
  17. Cort, John E. (2014). "Cultural Essays in honour of Mukund Lath". Religious Studies Review. 40: 56–57. doi:10.1111/rsr.12115_5.
  18. Monika Horstmann, ed. (2013). "Transforming Tradition: Cultural Essays in Honour of Mukund Lath". Religious Studies Review. VIII: 56–57. doi:10.1111/rsr.12115_5.
  19. "SNA". SNA. 2014. Archived from the original on 30 May 2015. Retrieved 20 December 2014.

Further reading