Municipalities of Colima

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Municipalities of Colima

Colima is a state in West Mexico that is divided into ten municipalities. [1] According to the 2015 Mexican Intercensal Survey, it is the state that has the smallest population with 711,235 inhabitants and is the fifth smallest by land area spanning 5,801.75 square kilometres (2,240.07 sq mi). [1] [2]

Colima State of Mexico

Colima, officially the Free and Sovereign State of Colima, is one of the 32 states that make up the 32 Federal Entities of Mexico. It shares its name with its capital and main city, Colima.

Mexico country in the southern portion of North America

Mexico, officially the United Mexican States, is a country in the southern portion of North America. It is bordered to the north by the United States; to the south and west by the Pacific Ocean; to the southeast by Guatemala, Belize, and the Caribbean Sea; and to the east by the Gulf of Mexico. Covering almost 2,000,000 square kilometres (770,000 sq mi), the nation is the fifth largest country in the Americas by total area and the 13th largest independent state in the world. With an estimated population of over 120 million people, the country is the eleventh most populous state and the most populous Spanish-speaking state in the world, while being the second most populous nation in Latin America after Brazil. Mexico is a federation comprising 31 states and Mexico City, a special federal entity that is also the capital city and its most populous city. Other metropolises in the state include Guadalajara, Monterrey, Puebla, Toluca, Tijuana and León.

Municipalities are the second-level administrative divisions of Mexico, where the first-level administrative division is the state. As of the establishment of two new municipalities in Chiapas in September 2017, there are 2,448 municipalities in Mexico, not including the 16 delegaciones of Mexico City. The internal political organization and their responsibilities are outlined in the 115th article of the 1917 Constitution and detailed in the constitutions of the states to which they belong.

Municipalities in Colima are administratively autonomous of the state according to the 115th article of the 1917 Constitution of Mexico. [3] The legal framework for Colima's municipalities is provided by Title VII of the state Constitution [4] and the 2001 Law of Free Municipalities in the State of Colima. [5] Every three years, citizens elect a municipal president (Spanish: presidente municipal) by a plurality voting system who heads a concurrently elected municipal council (ayuntamiento) responsible for providing all the public services for their constituents. The municipal council consists of a variable number of trustees and councillors (regidores y síndicos). [6] Municipalities are responsible for public services (such as water and sewerage), street lighting, public safety, traffic, supervision of slaughterhouses and the maintenance of public parks, gardens and cemeteries. [7] They may also assist the state and federal governments in education, emergency fire and medical services, environmental protection and maintenance of monuments and historical landmarks. Since 1984, they have had the power to collect property taxes and user fees, although more funds are obtained from the state and federal governments than from their own income. [7]

Constitution of Mexico supreme norm of the Mexican united states.

The Constitution of Mexico, formally the Political Constitution of the United Mexican States is the current constitution of Mexico. It was drafted in Santiago de Querétaro, in the State of Querétaro, by a constitutional convention, during the Mexican Revolution. It was approved by the Constitutional Congress on 5 February 1917. It is the successor to the Constitution of 1857, and earlier Mexican constitutions.

A presidente municipal is the chief of government of municipios in Mexico. This title was also used in the Philippines under the Spanish and American colonization; it is comparable to a mayor of the town or city. The position is comparable to the county executive of a county in the United States or to the mayor of a city in the United States, although the jurisdiction of a presidente municipal includes not only a city but the municipality surrounding it. Nationally, this position is also equivalent to that of Head of Government of the Federal District and that is why these positions are sometimes referred to as "mayors" in English-language publications.

Plurality voting is an electoral system in which each voter is allowed to vote for only one candidate, and the candidate who polls the most among their counterparts is elected. In a system based on single-member districts, it may be called first-past-the-post (FPTP), single-choice voting, simple plurality or relative/simple majority. In a system based on multi-member districts, it may be referred to as winner-takes-all or bloc voting. The system is often used to elect members of a legislative assembly or executive officers. It is the most common form of the system, and is used in most elections in the United States, the lower house in India, most elections in the United Kingdom, and Canada.

Article 88 of the state Constitution and Articles 11, 60 and 61 of the state's Law of Free Municipalities provide for the establishment of auxiliary authorities (autoridades auxiliares) to represent communities in the municipalities other than the municipal seat (cabecera). [4] [5] These are elected by residents of the communities every three years, and are unipersonal except in rural communities with a population over 2,000 inhabitants, which elect boards (juntas) comprising a president, secretary and treasurer. [5] [8] Auxiliary authorities serve as liaisons between local communities and the municipal government. They do not have executive powers [9] and do not constitute an independent level of local government. [4]

The largest municipality by population in Colima is Manzanillo, with 184,541 residents, and the smallest municipality is Ixtlahuacán with 5,527 residents. [1] The largest municipality by area is the municipality of Manzanillo which spans 1,361.29 km2 (525.60 sq mi), while Villa de Álvarez is the smallest at 288.69 km2 (111.47 sq mi). [2] The first municipality to incorporate was Colima on June 21, 1823 and the newest municipality is Armería which incorporated June 3, 1967. [10]

Manzanillo Municipality, Colima Municipality in Colima, Mexico

Manzanillo is a municipality in the Mexican state of Colima. The municipal seat lies at Manzanillo. The municipality covers an area of 1,578.3 km2 (609.4 sq mi), which also includes the remote Revillagigedo Islands.

Ixtlahuacán Municipality Municipality in Colima, Mexico

Ixtlahuacán is a municipality in the Mexican state of Colima. The municipal seat lies at Ixtlahuacán. The municipality covers an area of 468.7 km².

Villa de Álvarez Municipality Municipality in Colima, Mexico

Villa de Álvarez is a municipality in the Mexican state of Colima. The municipal seat lies at Villa de Álvarez.

Municipalities

Manzanillo, Colima Place in Colima, Mexico

Manzanillo is a city, seat of Manzanillo Municipality, in the Mexican state of Colima. The city, located on the Pacific Ocean, contains Mexico's busiest port that is responsible for handling Pacific cargo for the Mexico City area. It is the largest producing municipality for the business sector and tourism in the state of Colima.

Colima City Place in Colima, Mexico

Colima is a city that is the capital of the Colima state and the seat of Colima municipality, located in central−western Mexico.

Villa de Álvarez, Colima Municipal seat and city in Colima, Mexico

Ciudad de Villa de Álvarez is a city in the Mexican state of Colima. It is the municipal seat of Villa de Álvarez municipality. The city is adjacent to the northwest side of the state capital city of Colima and the two can be considered as "twin cities", with Ciudad de Villa de Álvarez having a 2005 census population of 97,701 and Colima having a population of 123,597. They are both part of the Colima-Villa de Álvarez metropolitan area, which includes the population of Colima municipality (132,237) and Villa de Álvarez municipality (100,121). The city and the municipality of Villa de Álvarez both rank third in the state in their respective categories in population, behind only Colima itself and Manzanillo. Villa de Álvarez municipality has an area of 428.4 km².

Dagger-14-plain.png State capital

NameMunicipal seatPopulation
(2015) [1] [11]
Population
(2010) [12]
ChangeLand area [2] Population density
(2015)
Incorporation date [10]
km2sq mi
Armería Ciudad de Armería 29,59928,695+3.2%410.05158.3272.2/km2 (187.0/sq mi)June 3, 1967
Colima Dagger-14-plain.png Colima 150,673146,904+2.6%748.40288.96201.3/km2 (521.4/sq mi)June 21, 1823
Comala Comala 21,54420,888+3.1%315.45121.8068.3/km2 (176.9/sq mi)August 15, 1823
Coquimatlán Coquimatlán 20,19819,385+4.2%528.59204.0938.2/km2 (99.0/sq mi)July 13, 1867
Cuauhtémoc Cuauhtémoc 30,19827,107+11.4%413.38159.6173.1/km2 (189.2/sq mi)February 1, 1919
Ixtlahuacán Ixtlahuacán 5,5275,300+4.3%376.08145.2014.7/km2 (38.1/sq mi)July 13, 1867
Manzanillo Manzanillo 184,541161,420+14.3%1,361.29525.60135.6/km2 (351.1/sq mi)June 20, 1873
Minatitlán Minatitlán 8,9858,174+9.9%416.15160.6821.6/km2 (55.9/sq mi)August 17, 1912
Tecomán Tecomán 123,191112,726+9.3%943.67364.35130.5/km2 (338.1/sq mi)August 15, 1823
Villa de Álvarez Villa de Álvarez 136,779119,956+14.0%288.69111.47473.8/km2 (1,227.1/sq mi)August 15, 1823
Colima 711,235650,555+9.3%5,801.752,240.07122.6/km2 (317.5/sq mi)
Mexico [13] 119,938,473112,336,538+6.8%1,972,550761,60660.8/km2 (157.5/sq mi)

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Número de habitantes". INEGI (National Institute of Statistics and Geography). Retrieved July 15, 2017.
  2. 1 2 3 "Unidad de Microrregiones, Cédulas de Información Municipal (SCIM)" (in Spanish). SEDESOL. Retrieved November 18, 2017.
  3. "Constitución Política de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos". Article 115,  of 1917 (in Spanish). Retrieved September 27, 2017.
  4. 1 2 3 "Constitución Política del Estado Libre y Soberano de Colima". Title VII, Act of November 25, 2017 (PDF) (in Spanish). Retrieved January 1, 2018.
  5. 1 2 3 "Ley del Municipio Libre del Estado de Colima" (PDF) (in Spanish). Directorate of Legislative Processes, Colima State Congress. September 10, 2016. Retrieved January 1, 2018.
  6. OECD (November 12, 2004). New Forms of Governance for Economic Development. OECD Publishing. p. 121. ISBN   978-9264015326.
  7. 1 2 International Business Publications (2009). Mexico Company Laws and Regulations Handbook. p. 42. ISBN   978-1-4330-7030-3.
  8. Polo Martínez, Humberto (November 2012). Administración pública comunitaria y gobierno local en México: Las autoridades auxiliares municipales (PDF) (in Spanish). National Institute of Public Administration. p. 145. ISBN   978-607-9026-26-4 . Retrieved January 1, 2018.
  9. Organización Democrática del Cabildo (PDF) (in Spanish). SEDESOL. 2010. p. 13. Retrieved January 1, 2018.
  10. 1 2 Estado de Colima. División Territorial de 1810 a 1995 (PDF) (in Spanish). Mexico: INEGI. 1996. p. 67. ISBN   978-970-13-1491-3.
  11. "Tabulados de la Encuesta Intercensal 2015" (xls) (in Spanish). INEGI. Retrieved July 15, 2017.
  12. "Localidades y su población por municipio según tamaño de localidad" (PDF) (in Spanish). INEGI. February 28, 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 14, 2018. Retrieved July 15, 2017.
  13. "Población" (in Spanish). INEGI. Retrieved January 20, 2018.