Municipalities of Spain

Last updated
Municipality
Municipalities of Spain.svg
Category Municipality
Location Spain
Found in Province or Commonwealth
Number8,122 (as of 18 December 2014)
GovernmentMunicipal council

The municipalities of Spain (Spanish : municipios, IPA:  [muniˈθipjos] , Catalan : municipis, Galician : concellos, Basque : udalerriak, Asturian : conceyos; sing. municipio) [note 1] are the basic level of Spanish local government.

Spanish language Romance language

Spanish or Castilian is a Romance language that originated in the Castile region of Spain and today has hundreds of millions of native speakers in the Americas and Spain. It is a global language and the world's second-most spoken native language, after Mandarin Chinese.

Catalan language Romance language

Catalan is a Western Romance language derived from Vulgar Latin and named after the medieval Principality of Catalonia, in northeastern modern Spain. It is the only official language of Andorra, and a co-official language of the Spanish autonomous communities of Catalonia, the Balearic Islands and Valencia. It also has semi-official status in the Italian commune of Alghero. It is also spoken in the eastern strip of Aragon, in some villages of Region of Murcia called Carche and in the Pyrénées-Orientales department of France. These territories are often called Països Catalans or "Catalan Countries".

Galician language Language of the Western Ibero-Romance

Galician is an Indo-European language of the Western Ibero-Romance branch. It is spoken by some 2.4 million people, mainly in Galicia, an autonomous community located in northwestern Spain, where it is official along with Spanish. The language is also spoken in some border zones of the neighbouring Spanish regions of Asturias and Castile and León, as well as by Galician migrant communities in the rest of Spain, in Latin America, the United States, Switzerland and elsewhere in Europe.

Contents

Organisation

Each municipality forms part of a province which in turn forms part or the whole of an autonomous community (17 in total plus Ceuta and Melilla): some autonomous communities have additional second level subdivisions, such as comarcas (districts) or mancomunidades (commonwealths). There are a total of 8,118 municipalities in Spain, including the autonomous cities of Ceuta and Melilla. [1] In the Principality of Asturias, municipalities are officially named concejos (councils). [2]

Municipality An administrative division having corporate status and usually some powers of self-government or jurisdiction

A municipality is usually a single administrative division having corporate status and powers of self-government or jurisdiction as granted by national and regional laws to which it is subordinate. It is to be distinguished (usually) from the county, which may encompass rural territory or numerous small communities such as towns, villages and hamlets.

Provinces of Spain provinces of Spain

Spain and its autonomous communities are divided into fifty provinces. Spain's provincial system was recognized in its 1978 constitution but its origin dates back to 1833. Ceuta, Melilla and the Plazas de soberanía are not part of any provinces.

Autonomous communities of Spain first-level political and administrative division of Spain

In Spain, an autonomous community is a first-level political and administrative division, created in accordance with the Spanish constitution of 1978, with the aim of guaranteeing limited autonomy of the nationalities and regions that make up Spain.

The average population of a municipality is about 5,300, but this figure masks a huge range: the most populous Spanish municipality is the city of Madrid, with a population of 3,141,991 (2015), while several rural municipalities have fewer than ten inhabitants (Villarroya, La Rioja, had a population of eight in 2015). The area of the municipal territory (Spanish: término municipal) usually ranges 2–40 km², but municipalities such as Tremp (Lleida) cover more than 300 km².

Madrid Capital of Spain

Madrid is the capital of Spain and the largest municipality in both the Community of Madrid and Spain as a whole. The city has almost 3.3 million inhabitants and a metropolitan area population of approximately 6.5 million. It is the third-largest city in the European Union (EU), smaller than only London and Berlin, and its monocentric metropolitan area is the third-largest in the EU, smaller only than those of London and Paris. The municipality covers 604.3 km2 (233.3 sq mi).

Villarroya, La Rioja Municipality in La Rioja, Spain

Villarroya is a municipality and village in the province and autonomous community of La Rioja, Spain. The municipality covers an area of 11.77 square kilometres (4.54 sq mi) and as of 2011 had a population of nine people.

Tremp Municipality in Catalonia, Spain

Tremp is a municipality in Catalonia, Spain, the capital of the comarca of the Pallars Jussà. It is the largest municipality in Catalonia in terms of area (303.97 km²), accounting for nearly a quarter of the total area of the comarca.

The organisation of the municipalities is governed by a 2 April 1985 law, completed by the 18 April 1986 royal decree. The Statutes of Autonomy of the various autonomous communities also contain provisions concerning the relations between the municipalities and the autonomous governments. In general, municipalities enjoy a large degree of autonomy in their local affairs: many of the functions of the comarcas and provinces are municipal powers pooled together.

Each municipality is a corporation with independent legal personality: its governing body is called the ayuntamiento (municipal council or corporation), a term often also used to refer to the municipal offices (city and town halls). The ayuntamiento is composed of the mayor (Spanish: alcalde), the deputy mayors (Spanish: tenientes de alcalde) and the plenary assembly (pleno) of councillors (concejales).

A legal person in legal context typically is a person —whether human or non-human—that is recognized as having certain privileges and obligations such as the legal capacity to enter into contracts, to sue, and to be sued.

A municipal council is the legislative body of a municipality such as a city council or a town council.

A municipal corporation is the legal term for a local governing body, including cities, counties, towns, townships, charter townships, villages, and boroughs. The term can also be used to describe municipally owned corporations.

The mayor and the deputy mayors are elected by the plenary assembly, which is itself elected by universal suffrage on a list system every four years. The plenary assembly must meet publicly at least every three months at the seat of the ayuntamiento. Many ayuntamientos also have a governing commission (comisión de gobierno), named by the mayor from among the councillors; it is required for municipalities of more than 5,000 inhabitants. The governing commission, whose role is to assist the mayor between meetings of the plenary assembly, may not include more than one third of the councillors.

Universal suffrage Political concept

The concept of universal suffrage, also known as general suffrage or common suffrage, consists of the right to vote of all adult citizens, regardless of property ownership, income, race, or ethnicity, subject only to minor exceptions. In its original 19th-century usage by political reformers, universal suffrage was understood to mean only universal manhood suffrage; the vote was extended to women later, during the women's suffrage movement.

Terminology

Spain's cities and main towns. SpainOMC.png
Spain's cities and main towns.
English Spanish Catalan  /  Valencian Galician Basque Asturian
Municipality Municipio MunicipiConcello or MunicipioUdalerriaConceyu
Municipal councilAyuntamientoAjuntament or Casa de la vilaConcelloUdalaAyuntamientu or Casa conceyu
MayorAlcaldeAlcalde or BatlleAlcaldeAlkateaAlcalde
Deputy MayorTeniente de alcaldeTinent d'alcaldeTenente de alcaldeAlkateordeaTeniente d'alcalde
Governing commissionComisión de gobiernoComissió de governComisión de gobernoGobernu batzordeaComisión de gobiernu
Plenary assemblyPlenoPlePlenoOsoko bilkuraPlenu
CouncillorConcejalRegidorConcelleiroZinegotziaConceyal

See also

Political divisions of Spain subclass of administrative territorial entities

The political division of the Kingdom of Spain is defined in Part VIII of the Spanish constitution of 1978, which establishes three levels of territorial organization: municipalities, provinces and autonomous communities, the first group constituting the subdivisions of the second, and the second group constituting the subdivisions of the last. The State guarantees the realization of the principle of solidarity by endeavouring to establish an economic balance between the different areas of the Spanish territory.

Spanish Federation of Municipalities and Provinces organization

The Spanish Federation of Municipalities and Provinces (FEMP) is a Spanish association of local entities that groups town councils, provincial councils and, insular councils and insular cabildos. Approximately 7,331 entities are represented.

Notes

  1. In other languages of Spain:

Related Research Articles

Ayuntamiento is the general term for the town council or cabildo of a municipality, or sometimes the municipality itself, in Spain and Latin America. Historically ayuntamiento was often preceded by the word excelentísimo, when referring to the council. This phrase is often abbreviated "Exc.mo Ay.to ".

A comarca is a traditional region or local administrative division found in Portugal, Spain and some of their former colonies: Panama, Nicaragua, and Brazil. The term is derived from the term marca, meaning a "march, mark", plus the prefix co-, meaning "together, jointly".

Parroquia (Spain) Wikipedia article covering multiple topics

A parroquia is a population entity or parish found in Galicia and Asturias in north-west Spain. The term may have its origins in Roman Catholic Church usage, similar to the British term parish. The concept forms a very settled part of the popular consciousness, but it has never become an official political division.

Grandas de Salime Municipality in Asturias, Spain

Grandas de Salime is a municipality in the Autonomous Community of the Principality of Asturias, Spain. It is famous for its hydroelectric dam across the Navia River, forming the Embalse de Salime. It is also famous for being a stop along the Camino Primitivo path of the Camino de Santiago, where it is the last stretch of Asturian land before the entrance into Galicia through the Acebo Pass.

Sariego Municipality in Asturias, Spain

Sariego is a municipality in the Autonomous Community of the Principality of Asturias, Spain. It is bordered on the north by Gijón and Villaviciosa, on the east by Villaviciosa, Nava and Cabranes, on the south by Siero and Nava, and on the west by Siero. The source of the Nora River is within the municipality.

Pola de Siero Place in Asturias, Spain

Pola de Siero is a town in the autonomous community of Asturias on the north coast of the Kingdom of Spain. It is the administrative capital of the municipality (concejo) of Siero. Pola de Siero is located in the centre of Asturias, approximately 16 km east of the regional Capital Oviedo and 16 km south of Gijón.

1979 Spanish local elections

The 1979 Spanish local elections were held on Tuesday, 3 April 1979, to elect all 67,505 councillors in the 7,870 municipalities of Spain and all 1,152 seats in 43 provincial deputations. The elections were held simultaneously with local elections in the four foral deputations of the Basque Country and Navarre and the ten island councils in the Balearic and Canary Islands.

1983 Spanish local elections

The 1983 Spanish local elections were held on Sunday, 8 May 1983, to elect all 67,505 councillors in the 7,781 municipalities of Spain and all 1,024 seats in 38 provincial deputations. The elections were held simultaneously with regional elections in thirteen autonomous communities, as well as local elections in the three foral deputations of the Basque Country and the ten island councils in the Balearic and Canary Islands.

An Ayuntamiento is the public organisation charged with the task of administering and governing the municipalities of Spain not bound to the regime of concejo abierto.

1991 Spanish local elections municipal elections in 1991

The 1991 Spanish local elections were held on Sunday, 26 May 1991, to elect all 66,308 councillors in the 8,060 municipalities of Spain and all 1,032 seats in 38 provincial deputations. The elections were held simultaneously with regional elections in thirteen autonomous communities, as well as local elections in the three foral deputations of the Basque Country and the ten island councils in the Balearic and Canary Islands.

1995 Spanish local elections municipal elections held in Spain in 1995

The 1995 Spanish local elections were held on Sunday, 28 May 1995, to elect all 65,869 councillors in the 8,067 municipalities of Spain and all 1,034 seats in 38 provincial deputations. The elections were held simultaneously with regional elections in thirteen autonomous communities, as well as local elections in the three foral deputations of the Basque Country and the ten island councils in the Balearic and Canary Islands.

2003 Spanish local elections

The 2003 Spanish local elections were held on Sunday, 25 May 2003, to elect all 65,510 councillors in the 8,108 municipalities of Spain and all 1,036 seats in 38 provincial deputations. The elections were held simultaneously with regional elections in thirteen autonomous communities, as well as local elections in the three foral deputations of the Basque Country and the ten island councils in the Balearic and Canary Islands.

The Local government in Spain pertains the government and administration powers exercised by the "local entities" in the country. It is one of the three tiers of government, along the state level and the regional level. Spain is adhered to the European Charter of Local Self-Government although it declares itself not bound to the full extent of the paragraph 2 of the Article 3 of the Charter.

2011 Seville City Council election

The 2011 Seville City Council election, also the 2011 Seville municipal election, was held on Sunday, 22 May 2011, to elect the 9th City Council of the municipality of Seville. All 33 seats in the City Council were up for election. The election was held simultaneously with regional elections in thirteen autonomous communities and local elections all throughout Spain.

References

  1. INE.
  2. Statute of Autonomy of the Principality of Asturias, Art. 6.1: "El Principado de Asturias se organiza territorialmente en municipios, que recibirán la denominación tradicional de Concejos, y en Comarcas".