Munida albiapicula

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Munida albiapicula
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Crustacea
Class: Malacostraca
Order: Decapoda
Infraorder: Anomura
Family: Munididae
Genus: Munida
Species:
M. albiapicula
Binomial name
Munida albiapicula
Baba & Yu, 1987

Munida albiapicula is a species of squat lobster in the family Munididae. [1] The specific epithet is derived from the combination of the Latin albus, meaning "white", and apiculus, meaning "tip", referring to the white tips of the supraocular spines. The males usually measure up to 20.7 millimetres (0.81 in), with the females measuring up to 16.9 millimetres (0.67 in). It is found off of the north east coast of Taiwan, at depths between about 50 and 450 metres (160 and 1,480 ft). [2]

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References

  1. Macpherson, E. (2009). "Munida albiapicula Baba & Yu, 1987". WoRMS. World Register of Marine Species . Retrieved 29 April 2017.
  2. "Munida albiapicula" at the Encyclopedia of Life