Musōyama Masashi

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Musōyama Masashi
武双山 正士
Musoyama 09 Sep.JPG
Personal information
BornTakehito Oso
(1972-02-14) February 14, 1972 (age 47)
Ibaraki, Japan
Height1.84 m (6 ft 12 in)
Weight175 kg (386 lb)
Career
Stable Musashigawa
University Senshu University
Record554-377-122
DebutJanuary, 1993
Highest rankŌzeki (May, 2000)
RetiredNovember, 2004
Elder name Fujishima
Championships 1 (Makuuchi)
2 (Makushita)
Special Prizes Outstanding Performance (5)
Fighting Spirit (4)
Technique (4)
Gold Stars 2 (Akebono, Takanohana II)
* Up to date as of July 2007.

Musōyama Masashi (born February 14, 1972 as Takehito Oso) is a former sumo wrestler from Mito, Ibaraki, Japan. A former amateur champion, he turned professional in January 1993, and he won promotion to the top makuuchi division in just four tournaments. He won thirteen special prizes and spent a total of 31 tournaments at komusubi and sekiwake before finally reaching the second highest rank of ōzeki in 2000, shortly after winning his only top division tournament championship or yūshō. He retired in 2004. He is now the head coach of Fujishima stable.

Sumo full-contact wrestling sport

Sumo is a form of competitive full-contact wrestling where a rikishi (wrestler) attempts to force his opponent out of a circular ring (dohyō) or into touching the ground with any body part other than the soles of his feet.

Mito, Ibaraki Special city in Kantō, Japan

Mito is the capital city of Ibaraki Prefecture, in the northern Kantō region of Japan. As of September 2015, the city has an estimated population of 270,953, and a population density of 1,250 persons per km2. Its total area is 217.32 km2.

Japan Constitutional monarchy in East Asia

Japan is an island country in East Asia. Located in the Pacific Ocean, it lies off the eastern coast of the Asian continent and stretches from the Sea of Okhotsk in the north to the East China Sea and the Philippine Sea in the south.

Contents

Early career

Oso was interested in sumo from a young age, as his father was the director of the Ibaraki Prefecture sumo association. [1] He won national amateur titles at high school and at Senshu University, where he was a rival of Tosanoumi. He made his professional debut in January 1993 in the third makushita division, as due to his amateur achievements he had been given makushita tsukedashi status. He breezed through makushita undefeated with two consecutive 7–0 scores to earn promotion to the second jūryō division, whereupon he changed his shikona from Oso to Musōyama, meaning "twin warrior mountain." [2] He made his debut in the top makuuchi division in September 1993. It took him only seven tournaments from his professional debut to make the san'yaku ranks, debuting at sekiwake in March 1994. In September he won his first eleven matches, finishing as runner up to Takanohana with a fine 13–2 record. Over the next few years he was regularly ranked at either sekiwake or komusubi , but was unable to make the next step up. He suffered a number of injuries, including a dislocated shoulder and a persistent problem with his left big toe which affected his speed of movement.

Ibaraki Prefecture Prefecture of Japan

Ibaraki Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan, located in the Kantō region. The capital is Mito.

Senshu University private university in Tokyo, Japan

Senshu University is a private university in Chiyoda, Tokyo, Japan.

Tosanoumi Toshio Japanese sumo wrestler

Tosanoumi Toshio, is a former sumo wrestler. He first reached the top division of professional sumo in 1995, winning 13 special prizes and earning 11 kinboshi or gold stars for defeating yokozuna over his long career. The highest rank he reached was sekiwake. He retired in 2010 to become a coach at his stable, Isenoumi stable under the name of Tatekawa.

Ōzeki career

In January 2000 Musōyama won his first top division yūshō or tournament championship with a score of 13–2, finishing one win ahead of Takanohana who he had defeated earlier in the tournament. He followed up with a 12–3 score in March, his second runner-up performance, which earned him promotion to ōzeki. [3] He missed the whole of his debut ōzeki tournament through injury and could manage only a 4–11 record on his return, resulting in demotion back to sekiwake. However he scored ten wins in the September 2000 tournament, which immediately restored him to ōzeki status. His time at ōzeki was bedeviled by further injuries which meant he was often merely struggling to maintain his rank instead of challenging for tournament championships and further promotion. His best performance as an ōzeki was a 12–3 runner-up score in March 2001, but that was the only tournament in which he was able to win more than ten bouts. On the 6th day of the May 2001 tournament he had a match with Kotomitsuki that lasted a total of nine minutes and 17 seconds. After two breaks, the match was eventually called off and rescheduled for later in the day, the first time this had happened in the top division since 1978. Musōyama lost the rearranged match. The last tournament in which he managed a score in double figures was in July 2003. After pulling out of the September 2004 tournament with only two wins he lost his first three matches in November and announced his retirement, at the age of 32. [4]

Kotomitsuki Keiji Sumo wrestler

Kotomitsuki Keiji is a former sumo wrestler from Okazaki City, Aichi Prefecture, Japan. A former amateur champion, he turned professional in 1999. He reached the top makuuchi division in November 2000 and won one yūshō or tournament championship, in September 2001. He was a runner-up in eight other tournaments, and earned thirteen sanshō or special prizes. He is one of five wrestlers in the history of sumo to receive all three sanshō in the same tournament, accomplishing the feat in the November 2000 honbasho. After a record 22 tournaments at sekiwake, he achieved promotion to sumo's second highest rank of ōzeki in July 2007 upon winning 35 out of 45 bouts in three consecutive tournaments. This made him at 31 the oldest man to reach ōzeki in the modern era. He wrestled for Sadogatake stable. On July 4, 2010, he was expelled from professional sumo by the Japan Sumo Association for his involvement in an illegal gambling ring.

After retirement

Musōyama remained in sumo as a coach at his stable and is now known as Fujishima-oyakata. He has also worked as a judge of tournament bouts. In September 2010 he took over as the head coach and changed its name to Fujishima stable. As of 2016 the stable does not have any wrestlers in the top two divisions.

Judge (sumo)

Shimpan (審判) or Shinpan are the ring-side judges of a professional sumo bout. In a sumo honbasho tournament five shimpan sit around the ring to observe which wrestler wins the matchup. When judging tournament bouts they wear formal Japanese dress of otokomono, haori with mon, and hakama. At the end of each bout an initial decision is given by the gyōji, which is usually correct and no action is taken by the shimpan.

Fujishima stable (2010) stable of sumo wrestlers

Fujishima stable, formerly known as Musashigawa stable, is a stable of sumo wrestlers, part of the Dewanoumi ichimon or group of stables. It was set up in August 1981 by former yokozuna Mienoumi, who branched off from Dewanoumi stable. Since its founding Dewanoumi had a long tradition of not permitting its coaches to break away and form new stables, and Mienoumi was the first to amicably depart Dewanoumi stable since Tochigiyama set up Kasugano stable 62 years earlier. By the early 2000s it had become the strongest stable in sumo, with a yokozuna, three ōzeki and several other top division wrestlers. Wrestlers from the stable won six consecutive tournaments from March 1999 to January 2000. In September 2008 Mienoumi also became head of the Sumo Association.

A sekitori (関取) is a rikishi who is ranked in one of the top two professional divisions: makuuchi and jūryō. The name literally translates to having taken the barrier, as only a relatively small fraction of those who enter professional sumo achieve sekitori status.

Fighting style

He was mainly a oshi-sumo wrestler, preferring pushing and thrusting techniques. His most common winning kimarite was oshi-dashi, a simple push out. [5] However, he was also capable of fighting on the mawashi , his favoured grip being hidari-yotsu (right hand outside, left hand inside).

Kimarite are winning techniques in a sumo bout. For each bout in a Grand Sumo tournament, a sumo referee, or gyōji, will decide and announce the type of kimarite used by the winner. It is possible for the judges to modify this decision later. Records of the kimarite are kept and statistical information on the preferred techniques of different wrestlers can be deduced easily. For example, a pie chart of the kimarite used by each sekitori in the past year can be found on the Japan Sumo Association webpage.

In sumo, a mawashi (廻し) is the belt (loincloth) that the rikishi wears during training or in competition. Upper ranked professional wrestlers wear a keshō-mawashi as part of the ring entry ceremony or dohyō-iri.

Career record

Musōyama Masashi [6]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1993 Makushita tsukedashi #60
70
Champion

 
EastMakushita#8
70
Champion

 
WestJūryō#9
96
 
WestJūryō#5
114
 
WestMaegashira#15
96
 
WestMaegashira#11
96
 
1994 WestMaegashira#3
105
O
WestSekiwake#1
96
 
WestSekiwake#1
96
 
WestSekiwake#1
87
 
EastSekiwake#1
132
FO
EastSekiwake#1
78
 
1995 WestKomusubi#1
438
 
WestMaegashira#4
Sat out due to injury
0015
WestMaegashira#4
114
FO
WestSekiwake#1
105
T
WestSekiwake#1
87
 
EastSekiwake#1
78
 
1996 WestKomusubi#1
105
 
EastSekiwake#2
123
T
EastSekiwake#1
105
 
WestSekiwake#1
78
 
EastKomusubi#1
78
 
WestKomusubi#1
87
 
1997 EastKomusubi#1
87
 
EastSekiwake#1
78
 
EastKomusubi#1
69
 
EastMaegashira#1
96
 
EastKomusubi#1
0312
 
EastMaegashira#6
114
F
1998 EastSekiwake#1
105
F
WestSekiwake#1
96
 
WestSekiwake#1
510
 
EastMaegashira#2
96
 
EastKomusubi#1
87
 
EastKomusubi#1
96
 
1999 WestSekiwake#2
105
O
EastSekiwake#1
1212
 
EastMaegashira#6
Sat out due to injury
0015
EastMaegashira#6
114
 
WestKomusubi#1
87
 
EastKomusubi#1
105
 
2000 EastSekiwake#2
132
OT
EastSekiwake#1
123
T
WestŌzeki#1
Sat out due to injury
0015
WestŌzeki#2
411
 
WestSekiwake#1
105
 
WestŌzeki#3
96
 
2001 WestŌzeki#3
96
 
WestŌzeki#1
123
 
WestŌzeki#1
96
 
WestŌzeki#1
105
 
EastŌzeki#2
105
 
EastŌzeki#1
96
 
2002 WestŌzeki#1
105
 
EastŌzeki#2
105
 
EastŌzeki#2
951
 
WestŌzeki#2
Sat out due to injury
0015
WestŌzeki#2
87
 
WestŌzeki#2
105
 
2003 WestŌzeki#1
87
 
EastŌzeki#1
168
 
EastŌzeki#2
87
 
EastŌzeki#2
105
 
EastŌzeki#2
159
 
WestŌzeki#2
96
 
2004 EastŌzeki#2
546
 
WestŌzeki#2
96
 
WestŌzeki#2
69
 
EastŌzeki#2
87
 
EastŌzeki#2
276
 
EastŌzeki#2
Retired
04
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: Makuuchi Jūryō Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks:  Yokozuna Ōzeki Sekiwake Komusubi Maegashira

See also

Glossary of sumo terms Wikimedia list article

The following words are terms used in sumo wrestling in Japan.

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References

  1. "Musoyama: A bull quits the Arena". Le Monde Du Sumo. December 2004. Retrieved 2007-07-20.
  2. Kaori, Shoji (14 January 2000). "Wrestling with a national tradition". Japan Times. Retrieved 13 February 2017.
  3. "Musoyama promoted". The Japan Times. 2000-03-30. Retrieved 2007-07-20.
  4. "Ozeki Musoyama calls it quits". The Japan Times. 2004-11-18. Retrieved 2012-10-02.
  5. "Musoyama bouts by kimarite". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 28 January 2010.
  6. "Musōyama Masashi Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2012-07-25.