Myonggan County

Last updated
Myonggan County
명간군
County
Korean transcription(s)
  Hanja明澗郡
  McCune-ReischauerMyŏnggan kun
  Revised RomanizationMyeonggan-gun
DPRK2006 Hambuk-Hwasong.PNG
Map of North Hamgyong showing the location of Myonggan
Country North Korea
Province North Hamgyong Province
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 3 labor districts, 22 ri

Myŏnggan County, formerly known as Hwasŏng County, is a kun, or county, in North Hamgyong province, North Korea. Unlike many Korean districts that date from the Joseon Dynasty, Hwasong was created after liberation. Yŏngan was established in 1952, separated from Myŏngch'ŏn. In 1967 Yŏngan was renamed to Myŏnggan, in 1981 to Hwasŏng, and in 2004 to Myŏnggan.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. The name Korea is derived from Goguryeo which was one of the great powers in East Asia during its time, ruling most of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria, parts of the Russian Far East and Inner Mongolia, under Gwanggaeto the Great. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers; it is bordered to the south by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Myongchon County County in North Hamgyong Province, North Korea

Myŏngch'ŏn County is a kun, or county, in North Hamgyong province, North Korea. An intermediate-range ballistic missile base is located here. In addition, the county is home to numerous hot springs.

Myŏnggan abuts the Sea of Japan (East Sea of Korea). Most of the land is rugged, with only one small plain along the Hwasongchon stream. The highest point in the county is Kiunbong. There are no ports, and the coastline is distinctively monotonous.

Sea of Japan Marginal sea between Japan, Russia and Korea

The Sea of Japan is the marginal sea between the Japanese archipelago, Sakhalin, the Korean Peninsula and Russia. The Japanese archipelago separates the sea from the Pacific Ocean. It is bordered by Japan, Korea and Russia. Like the Mediterranean Sea, it has almost no tides due to its nearly complete enclosure from the Pacific Ocean. This isolation also reflects in the fauna species and in the water salinity, which is lower than in the ocean. The sea has no large islands, bays or capes. Its water balance is mostly determined by the inflow and outflow through the straits connecting it to the neighboring seas and Pacific Ocean. Few rivers discharge into the sea and their total contribution to the water exchange is within 1%.

The chief streams of the county are the Ŏrangch'ŏn (Chosŏn'gŭl: 어랑천, Hancha: 漁郎川) and Myŏngganch'ŏn (Chosŏn'gŭl: 명간천, Hancha: 明澗川). More than 80% of the county is taken up by forestland.

Myŏnggan is known for its pear orchards. In addition, livestock are widely raised. There are also coal mines in the county.

Political Prison Camp No. 16 is a large prison labor colony in the western part of the county. [1]

Hwasong concentration camp is a labor camp in North Korea for political prisoners. The official name is Kwan-li-so No. 16.

Administrative divisions

Myŏnggan County is divided into 1 ŭp (town), 3 rodongjagu (workers' districts) and 22 ri (villages):

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

  • Myŏnggan-ŭp
  • Kŭktong-rodongjagu
  • Pyongban-rodongjagu
  • Ryanghwa-rodongjagu
  • Ch'ŏngryong-ri
  • Hamji-li
  • Hap'yŏng-ri
  • Hau-ri
  • Hawŏl-li
  • Honam-ri
  • Hosal-li
  • Hwaryong-ri
  • Kosŏng-ri
  • Kŭndong-ri
  • Kwang'am-ri
  • Myŏngnam-ri
  • Paengrong-ri
  • Puam-ri
  • Puhwa-ri
  • Ripsŏng-ri
  • Ryongdong-ri
  • Ryongdŏng-ri
  • Samp'o-ri
  • Sangjang-ri
  • Sinyang-ri
  • Yangch'ŏl-li

Notes

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