Myron Fuller

Last updated
Myron Fuller
Myron Fuller Tulane.jpg
Fuller pictured in 1922
Biographical details
Born(1889-06-04)June 4, 1889
Boston, Massachusetts
DiedAugust 31, 1949(1949-08-31) (aged 60)
Mountain Lakes, New Jersey
Playing career
1910 Yale
Position(s) Guard, tackle
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1912–1913 Stevens
1914–1915 Colby
1916 Haverford School
1917 Swarthmore (assistant)
1918 Hog Island Shipyard
1919 West Virginia (line)
1920 North Carolina
1921 Tulane
1922–1927 Yale (line)
Head coaching record
Bowls17–33 (college)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 Maine Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1914)

Myron Elmer Fuller (June 4, 1889 – August 31, 1949) was an American football player and coach.

Contents

Playing career

Fuller played football at Yale University in 1910 and graduated from the school in 1911.

Coaching career

He served as the head coach at Stevens Institute of Technology (1912–1913) Colby College (1914–1915), Haverford School (1916), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (1920), and Tulane University (1921). He later served as a line coach for the Yale Bulldogs. His 1914 Colby team is considered to be one of the strongest college teams ever in the state of Maine. Colby defeated their opponents by a combined score of 277 to 49, swept in-state rivals Maine, Bowdoin, and Bates, beat Holy Cross 17 to 0, and nearly upset Navy in a 31 to 21 game. [1]

Later life and death

Fuller left coaching after 1927 to pursue a career in industrial engineering. He died of a heart attack at his home in Mountain Lakes, New Jersey on August 31, 1949 at the age of 60. [2]

Head coaching record

College

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Stevens (Independent)(1912–1913)
1912 Stevens1–9
1913 Stevens2–6
Stevens:3–15
Colby Mules (Maine Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1914–1915)
1914 Colby 6–23–01st
1915 Colby4–42–1
Stevens:10–65–1
North Carolina Tar Heels (South Atlantic Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1920)
1920 North Carolina 2–60–515th
North Carolina:2–60–5
Tulane Green Wave (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1921)
1921 Tulane 4–63–313th
Tulane:4–63–3
Total:17–33

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References

  1. "Coach Myron E. Fuller". News and Observer (Raleigh). February 25, 1920.
  2. "Myron E. Fuller" (PDF). The New York Times . September 2, 1949. Retrieved October 19, 2010.