NCAA Division III Football Championship

Last updated
2016 Stagg Bowl logo 2016 Stagg Bowl logo.jpg
2016 Stagg Bowl logo

The NCAA Division III Football Championship began in 1973.

Contents

The Division III playoffs begin with 32 teams selected to participate in the Division III playoffs. The Division III championship game, known as the Stagg Bowl (named after Amos Alonzo Stagg), will be held at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium in Canton, Ohio in 2021 and Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium on the grounds of the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland in 2022, with sites selected through 2025. The championship game had previously been held at Woodforest Bank Stadium in Shenandoah, Texas (2018–2019), Salem Football Stadium in Salem, Virginia (1993–2017), at Hawkins Stadium in Bradenton, Florida (1990–1992), Garrett-Harrison Stadium in Phenix City, Alabama (1973–1982, 1985–1989), and at Galbreath Field at the College Football Hall of Fame, when the Hall was located in Kings Island, Ohio (1983–1984).

North Central (IL) defeated Wisconsin-Whitewater to win the 2019 season championship.

West and East Regional Championships (1969–1972)

In 1969, the NCAA started two regional championship games for small college teams: the East Regional's Knute Rockne Bowl and the West's Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl. When the NCAA developed a national Division III championship game in 1973, the Stagg Bowl name and the host city of Phenix City, Alabama was chosen.

West Regional championship (Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl)

YearDateChampionRunner-upScoreVenueLocationAttendance
1969 Wittenberg William Jewell 27–21 Springfield, Ohio
1970 Capital Luther 34–21 Columbus, Ohio
1971 Samford (vacated) Ohio Wesleyan 20–10 Phenix City, Alabama
1972Nov 24 Heidelberg Fort Valley State 28–16 Phenix City, Alabama

East Regional championship (Knute Rockne Bowl)

YearDateChampionRunner-upScoreVenueLocationAttendance
1969Nov 29 Randolph–Macon Bridgeport 47–28 Bridgeport, Connecticut
1970Nov 28 Montclair State Hampden–Sydney 7–6 Atlantic City, New Jersey
1971Nov 26 Bridgeport Hampden–Sydney 17–12 Atlantic City, New Jersey
1972Nov 24 Bridgeport Slippery Rock 27–22 Atlantic City, New Jersey

National championship games

YearDateChampionRunner-upScoreAttendanceVenueLocationWinning head coach
1973 Dec. 8 Wittenberg Juniata 41–05,000 Garrett-Harrison Stadium Phenix City, Alabama Dave Maurer
1974 Dec. 7 Central (IA) Ithaca 10–85,500 Ron Schipper
1975 Dec. 6 Wittenberg Ithaca 28–06,000 Dave Maurer
1976 Dec. 4 Saint John's (MN) Towson 31–287,214 John Gagliardi
1977 Dec. 3 Widener Wabash 39–367,852 Bill Manlove
1978 Dec. 2 Baldwin–Wallace Wittenberg 24–107,500 Lee Tressel
1979 Dec. 1 Ithaca Wittenberg 14–106,500 Jim Butterfield
1980 Dec. 6 Dayton Ithaca 63–08,701 Rick E. Carter
1981 Dec. 5 Widener Dayton 17–106,100 Bill Manlove
1982 Dec. 4 West Georgia Augustana (IL) 14–09,000 Bobby Pate
1983 Dec. 1 Augustana (IL) Union (NY) 21–173,800 Galbreath Field Kings Island, Ohio Bob Reade
1984 Dec. 8 Augustana (IL) Central (IA) 21–122,300 Bob Reade
1985 Dec. 14 Augustana (IL) Ithaca 20–71,879 Garrett-Harrison Stadium Phenix City, Alabama Bob Reade
1986 Dec. 13 Augustana (IL) Salisbury State 31–32,000 Bob Reade
1987 Dec. 12 Wagner Dayton 19–34,000 Walt Hameline
1988 Dec. 10 Ithaca Central (IA) 39–244,000 Jim Butterfield
1989 Dec. 9 Dayton Union (NY) 17–73,500 Mike Kelly
1990 Dec. 8 Allegheny Lycoming 21–14 (OT)4,800 Hawkins Stadium Bradenton, Florida Ken O'Keefe
1991 Dec. 14 Ithaca Dayton 34–205,469 Jim Butterfield
1992 Dec. 12 Wisconsin–La Crosse Washington & Jefferson 16–125,392 Roger Harring
1993 Dec. 11 Mount Union Rowan 34–247,304 Salem Football Stadium Salem, Virginia Larry Kehres
1994 Dec. 10 Albion Washington & Jefferson 38–157,168 Pete Schmidt
1995 Dec. 9 Wisconsin–La Crosse Rowan 36–74,905 Roger Harring
1996 Dec. 14 Mount Union Rowan 56–245,048 Larry Kehres
1997 Dec. 13 Mount Union Lycoming 61–125,777 Larry Kehres
1998 Dec. 12 Mount Union Rowan 44–245,145 Larry Kehres
1999 Dec. 18 Pacific Lutheran Rowan 42–134,101 Frosty Westering
2000 Dec. 16 Mount Union Saint John's (MN) 10–74,436 Larry Kehres
2001 Dec. 15 Mount Union Bridgewater 30–277,992 Larry Kehres
2002 Dec. 21 Mount Union Trinity (TX) 48–74,398 Larry Kehres
2003 Dec. 20 Saint John's (MN) Mount Union 24–65,073 John Gagliardi
2004 Dec. 18 Linfield Mary Hardin–Baylor 28–213,240 Jay Locey
2005 Dec. 17 Mount Union Wisconsin–Whitewater 35–284,619 Larry Kehres
2006 Dec. 16 Mount Union Wisconsin–Whitewater 35–166,051 Larry Kehres
2007 Dec. 15 Wisconsin–Whitewater Mount Union 31–215,099 Lance Leipold
2008 Dec. 20 Mount Union Wisconsin–Whitewater 31–265,344 Larry Kehres
2009 Dec. 19 Wisconsin–Whitewater Mount Union 38–283,468 Lance Leipold
2010 Dec. 18 Wisconsin–Whitewater Mount Union 31–214,598 Lance Leipold
2011 Dec. 16 Wisconsin–Whitewater Mount Union 13–103,784 Lance Leipold
2012 Dec. 14 Mount Union St. Thomas (MN) 28–106,027 Larry Kehres
2013 Dec. 20 Wisconsin–Whitewater Mount Union 52–145,371 Lance Leipold
2014 Dec. 19 Wisconsin–Whitewater Mount Union 43–345,465 Lance Leipold
2015 Dec. 18 Mount Union St. Thomas (MN) 49–355,343 Vince Kehres
2016 Dec. 16 Mary Hardin–Baylor § Wisconsin–Oshkosh 10–73,476 Pete Fredenburg
2017 Dec. 15 Mount Union Mary Hardin–Baylor 12–04,971 Vince Kehres
2018 Dec. 14 Mary Hardin–Baylor Mount Union 24–166,816 Woodforest Bank Stadium Shenandoah, Texas Pete Fredenburg
2019 Dec. 20 North Central (IL) Wisconsin–Whitewater 41–141,362 Jeff Thorne
2020 Canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
2021 Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium Canton, Ohio
2022 Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium Annapolis, Maryland
2023 Salem Football Stadium Salem, Virginia
2024 Turner Stadium Humble, Texas
2025 Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium Canton, Ohio

§ - On October 10, 2019, the NCAA vacated the 2016 championship due to violations self-reported by UMHB. [1] The appeal was unsuccessful, therefore there was no champion declared for the 2016 season. In late June 2020, UMHB's 2016 and 2017 seasons' wins and records were also vacated. [2]

Most national championships

50-yard line action at the 2010 Stagg Bowl 2010 Stagg Bowl.jpg
50-yard line action at the 2010 Stagg Bowl
TeamTitlesWinning Years
Mount Union 131993, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2012, 2015, 2017
Wisconsin–Whitewater 62007, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2014
Augustana (IL) 41983, 1984, 1985, 1986
Ithaca 31979, 1988, 1991
Saint John's (MN) 21976, 2003
Wisconsin–La Crosse 21992, 1995
Dayton 21980, 1989
Widener 21977, 1981
Wittenberg 21973, 1975
North Central (IL) 12019
Mary Hardin-Baylor 12016, 2018
Linfield 12004
Pacific Lutheran 11999
Albion 11994
Allegheny 11990
Wagner 11987
West Georgia 11982
Baldwin-Wallace 11978
Central (IA) 11974

§ - note that on October 10, 2019 the NCAA vacated the 2016 championship due to violations self-reported by UMHB. The appeal was unsuccessful, therefore there was no champion declared for the 2016 season. UMHB also had its wins and records from that season and in 2017 vacated.

Championship game appearances

Programs that no longer compete in Division III are indicated in italics with a pink backgrounf.

TeamAppearancesYears
Mount Union 211993, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2017, 2018
Wisconsin–Whitewater 102005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2019
Ithaca 71974, 1975, 1979, 1980, 1985, 1988, 1991
Augustana (IL) 51982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986
Dayton 51980, 1981, 1987, 1989, 1991
Rowan 51993, 1995, 1996, 1998, 1999
Wittenberg 41973, 1975, 1978, 1979
Mary Hardin-Baylor 32004, 2016, 2017, 2018
Central (IA) 31974, 1984, 1988
Saint John's (MN) 31976, 2001, 2003
Lycoming 21990, 1997
St. Thomas (MN) 22012, 2015
Washington & Jefferson 21992, 1994
Widener 21977, 1981
Wisconsin–La Crosse 21992, 1995
Union (NY) 21983, 1989
Albion 11994
Allegheny 11990
Baldwin Wallace 11978
Bridgewater (VA) 12001
Juniata 11973
Linfield 12004
North Central (IL) 12019
Pacific Lutheran 11999
Salisbury State 11986
Trinity (TX) 12002
Towson State 11976
Wabash 11977
Wagner 11987
West Georgia 11982
Wisconsin–Oshkosh 12016

Of the programs that no longer compete in D-III, West Georgia is the only one that is currently in Division II. All others compete in Division I FCS.

Stagg Bowl Most Outstanding Player Award

As voted by the media at the game since 2000.

YearPlayerTeamClassPosition
2000Chuck MooreMount UnionSeniorRB
2001Chuck MooreMount Union5th year SeniorRB
2002Dan PughMount UnionSeniorRB
2003Blake ElliotSaint John'sSeniorWR
2004Riley JenkinsLinfieldSeniorRB
2005Nate KmicMount UnionFreshmanRB
2006Greg MicheliMount UnionSophomoreQB
2007Justin BeaverUW-WhitewaterSeniorRB
2008Greg MicheliMount UnionSeniorQB
2009Levell CoppageUW-WhitewaterSophomoreRB
2010Levell CoppageUW-WhitewaterJuniorRB
2011Loussaint MinettUW-WhitewaterSophomoreDE
2012Kevin BurkeMount UnionSophomoreQB
2013 Matt Behrendt UW-WhitewaterJuniorQB
2014 Matt Behrendt UW-WhitewaterSeniorQB
2015Taurice ScottMount UnionSeniorQB
2016Blake JacksonMary Hardin-BaylorSeniorQB
2017Nick BrishMount UnionSophomoreDB
2018T.J. JoseyMary Hardin–BaylorSeniorWR
2019Ethan GreenfieldNorth CentralSophomoreRB

See also

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The 1985 NCAA Division III football season, part of college football in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association at the Division III level, began in August 1985, and concluded with the NCAA Division III Football Championship, also known as the Stagg Bowl, in December 1985 at Garrett-Harrison Stadium in Phenix City, Alabama. The Augustana (IL) Vikings won the third of their four consecutive Division III championships by defeating the Ithaca Bombers by a final score of 20−7.

The 1986 NCAA Division III football season, part of the college football season organized by the NCAA at the Division III level in the United States, began in August 1986, and concluded with the NCAA Division III Football Championship, also known as the Stagg Bowl, in December 1986 at Garrett-Harrison Stadium in Phenix City, Alabama. The Augustana (IL) Vikings won the fourth of their four consecutive Division III championships by defeating the Salisbury State Sea Gulls by a final score of 31−3.

The 1987 NCAA Division III football season, part of the college football season organized by the NCAA at the Division III level in the United States, began in August 1987, and concluded with the NCAA Division III Football Championship, also known as the Stagg Bowl, in December 1987 at Garrett-Harrison Stadium in Phenix City, Alabama.

The 1988 NCAA Division III football season, part of the college football season organized by the NCAA at the Division III level in the United States, began in August 1988, and concluded with the NCAA Division III Football Championship, also known as the Stagg Bowl, in December 1988 at Garrett-Harrison Stadium in Phenix City, Alabama. The Ithaca Bombers won their third Division III championship by defeating the Central (IA) Dutch, 39−24.

The 1993 NCAA Division III football season, part of the college football season organized by the NCAA at the Division III level in the United States, began in August 1993, and concluded with the NCAA Division III Football Championship, also known as the Stagg Bowl, in December 1993 at Salem Football Stadium in Salem, Virginia. The Mount Union Purple Raiders won their first Division III championship by defeating the Rowan Profs, 34−24. The first Gagliardi Trophy was awarded to Mount Union's quarterback Jim Ballard.

The 1995 NCAA Division III football season, part of the college football season organized by the NCAA at the Division III level in the United States, began in August 1995, and concluded with the NCAA Division III Football Championship, also known as the Stagg Bowl, in December 1995 at Salem Football Stadium in Salem, Virginia. The Wisconsin–La Crosse Eagles won their second Division III championship by defeating the Rowan Profs, 36−7. The Gagliardi Trophy, given to the most outstanding player in Division III football, was awarded to Chris Palmer, wide receiver from St. John's (MN).

The 2006 NCAA Division III football season, part of the college football season organized by the NCAA at the Division III level in the United States, began in August 2006, and concluded with the NCAA Division III Football Championship, also known as the Stagg Bowl, in December 2006 at Salem Football Stadium in Salem, Virginia. The Mount Union Purple Raiders won their ninth Division III championship by defeating the Wisconsin–Whitewater Warhawks, 35−16. This was the second of seven straight championship games between Mount Union and Wisconsin–Whitewater and the second straight win for Mount Union.

The 2007 NCAA Division III football season, part of the college football season organized by the NCAA at the Division III level in the United States, began in August 2007, and concluded with the NCAA Division III Football Championship, also known as the Stagg Bowl, in December 2007 at Salem Football Stadium in Salem, Virginia. The Wisconsin–Whitewater Warhawks won their first Division III championship by defeating the Mount Union Purple Raiders, 31−21. This was the third of seven straight championship games between Mount Union and Wisconsin–Whitewater.

The 2008 NCAA Division III football season, part of the college football season organized by the NCAA at the Division III level in the United States, began in August 2008, and concluded with the NCAA Division III Football Championship, also known as the Stagg Bowl, in December 2008 at Salem Football Stadium in Salem, Virginia. The Mount Union Purple Raiders won their tenth Division III championship by defeating the Wisconsin–Whitewater Warhawks, 31−26. This was the fourth of seven straight championship games between Mount Union and Wisconsin–Whitewater.

The 2009 NCAA Division III football season, part of the college football season organized by the NCAA at the Division III level in the United States, began in August 2009, and concluded with the NCAA Division III Football Championship, also known as the Stagg Bowl, in December 2009 at Salem Football Stadium in Salem, Virginia. The Wisconsin–Whitewater Warhawks won their second Division III championship by defeating the Mount Union Purple Raiders, 38−28. This was the fifth of seven straight championship games between Mount Union and Wisconsin–Whitewater.

The 2010 NCAA Division III football season, part of the college football season organized by the NCAA at the Division III level in the United States, began in August 2007, and concluded with the NCAA Division III Football Championship, also known as the Stagg Bowl, in December 2007 at Salem Football Stadium in Salem, Virginia. The Wisconsin–Whitewater Warhawks won their first Division III championship by defeating the Mount Union Purple Raiders, 31−21. This was the sixth of seven straight championship games between Mount Union and Wisconsin–Whitewater.

The 2011 NCAA Division III football season, part of the college football season organized by the NCAA at the Division III level in the United States, began in August 2011, and concluded with the NCAA Division III Football Championship, also known as the Stagg Bowl, in December 2011 at Salem Football Stadium in Salem, Virginia. The Wisconsin–Whitewater Warhawks won their fourth, and third consecutive, Division III championship by defeating the Mount Union Purple Raiders, 13−10. This was the seventh of seven straight championship games between Mount Union and Wisconsin–Whitewater.

The 2012 NCAA Division III football season, part of the college football season organized by the NCAA at the Division III level in the United States, began in August 2012, and concluded with the NCAA Division III Football Championship, also known as the Stagg Bowl, in December 2012 at Salem Football Stadium in Salem, Virginia. The Mount Union Purple Raiders won their eleventh Division III championship by defeating the St. Thomas (MN) Tommies, 28−10.

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References

  1. "UMHB to appeal vacating 2016 title". D3football.com. Retrieved October 10, 2019.
  2. "NCAA denies UMHB sanctions appeal". KCEN-TV. June 26, 2020.

Sources