NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Championship

Last updated
Women's Division I Soccer Championship
NCAA logo.svg
Founded1982
Number of teams64
Current champions Florida State(2)
Most successful club(s) North Carolina (21 and 3-time runner-up)

Notre Dame (3 and 5-times runner-up)

Florida State (2 and 2-time runner-up)
Television broadcasters ESPNU
Website NCAA.com
Soccerball current event.svg 2018 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament

The NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Championship, sometimes known as the Women's College Cup, is an American college soccer tournament conducted by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), and determines the Division I women's national champion.

College soccer form of soccer

College soccer is played by teams composed of soccer players who are enrolled in colleges and universities. While it is most widespread in the United States, it is also prominent in South Korea and Canada. The institutions typically hire full-time professional coaches and staff, although the student athletes are strictly amateur and are not paid. College soccer in the United States is sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), the sports regulatory body for major universities, and by the governing bodies for smaller universities and colleges. This sport is played on a rectangular field of the dimensions of about 64m (meters) - 70m sideline to sideline (width), and 100m - 110m goal line to goal line (length).

National Collegiate Athletic Association Non-profit organization that regulates many American college athletes and programs

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is a non-profit organization which regulates athletes of 1,268 North American institutions and conferences. It also organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, and helps more than 480,000 college student-athletes who compete annually in college sports. The organization is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana.

NCAA Division I highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association

NCAA Division I (D-I) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States. D-I schools include the major collegiate athletic powers, with larger budgets, more elaborate facilities and more athletic scholarships than Divisions II and III as well as many smaller schools committed to the highest level of intercollegiate competition.

Contents

History

The NCAA began conducting a single division Women's Soccer Championship tournament in 1982 with a 12-team tournament. The tournament became the Division I Championship in 1986, when Division III was created for non-scholarship programs. Currently, the tournament field consists of 64 teams. The semifinals and final of the tournament, held at a single site every year, are collectively known as the Women's College Cup (analogous to the College Cup in men's soccer).

Historically, North Carolina has been the dominant school in Division I women's soccer. Known widely as one of the most successful collegiate programs in any NCAA sport, the Tar Heels have won 21 national championships of the 31 NCAA tournaments contested. They also won the only AIAW national championship in soccer in 1981. The Tar Heels have reached the College Cup 26 times. Head coach Anson Dorrance is considered one of the greatest women's soccer coaches in NCAA history, leading the Tar Heels since the inception of the program in 1979.

North Carolina Tar Heels womens soccer

The North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer team represent the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the Atlantic Coast Conference of NCAA Division I soccer. The team has won 20 of the 27 Atlantic Coast Conference championships, and 22 of the 36 NCAA national championships.

Anson Dorrance American soccer player-coach

Albert Anson Dorrance IV is an American soccer coach. He is currently the head coach of the women's soccer program at the University of North Carolina. He has one of the most successful coaching records in the history of athletics. Under Dorrance's leadership, the Tar Heels have won 21 of the 31 NCAA Women's Soccer Championships. The Tar Heels' record under Dorrance stood at 809-67-36 over 33 seasons at the end of the 2017 season. He has led his team to a 101-game unbeaten streak and coached 13 different women to a total of 20 National Player of the Year awards. The NCAA has recognized Dorrance as the Women's Soccer Coach of the Year seven times and as the Men's Soccer Coach of the Year in 1987. On March 10, 2008 Dorrance was elected to the National Soccer Hall of Fame.

Only five other schools have multiple titles, Notre Dame (3 titles, 5-times runner-up and 12 College Cup appearances),Florida State (2 titles, 2-time runner-up and 10 college cup appearances) Portland (2 titles, 1-time runner-up and 8 College Cup appearances), USC (2 titles, 2 College Cup appearances), and Stanford (2 titles, 2-times runner-up and 8 College Cup appearances).

Notre Dame Fighting Irish womens soccer

The Notre Dame Fighting Irish women's soccer team represents the University of Notre Dame in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I women's soccer. The team competes in the Atlantic Coast Conference and is currently coached by Nate Norman, following the resignation of Theresa Romagnolo. The Fighting Irish have won three of the 29 NCAA national championships.

Florida State Seminoles womens soccer

The Florida State Seminoles women's soccer team represents Florida State University in the sport of college soccer. The Seminoles compete in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) and the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC).

Portland Pilots college athletics program at the University of Portland

The Portland Pilots is the nickname for athletics at the University of Portland. The Pilots compete in the West Coast Conference (WCC) at the NCAA Division I level.

Champions

NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Championship
YearSite
(Host)
StadiumTeam ChampionshipThird Place Final / SemifinalistsAttendance
ChampionScoreRunner-upChampionScoreRunner-up
1982
Details
Orlando, Florida
(Central Florida)
University of Central Florida North Carolina 1–0 Central Florida Connecticut 2–1 UMSL 1,000
1983
Details
North Carolina (2)4–0 George Mason Massachusetts1–0Connecticut700
1984
Details
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
(North Carolina)
Fetzer Field North Carolina (3)2–0Connecticut Massachusetts 4–1 California 3,500
1985
Details
Fairfax, Virginia
(George Mason)
George Mason Stadium George Mason2–0North Carolina Colorado College, Massachusetts4,500
1986
Details
North Carolina (4)2–0Colorado CollegeGeorge Mason, Massachusetts1,000
1987
Details
Amherst, Massachusetts
(Massachusetts)
Warren McGuirk Alumni Stadium North Carolina (5)1–0MassachusettsCalifornia, Central Florida3,651
1988
Details
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
(North Carolina)
Fetzer FieldNorth Carolina (6)4–1 NC State California, Wisconsin 3,500
1989
Details
Raleigh, North Carolina
(NC State)
Method Road Soccer Stadium North Carolina (7)2–0Colorado CollegeNC State, Santa Clara 1,625
1990
Details
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
(North Carolina)
Fetzer FieldNorth Carolina (8)6–0ConnecticutColorado College, Santa Clara3,200
1991
Details
North Carolina (9)3–1WisconsinColorado College, Virginia 3,800
1992
Details
North Carolina (10)9–1 Duke Hartford, Santa Clara3,573
1993
Details
North Carolina (11)6–0George MasonMassachusetts, Stanford 5,721
1994
Details
Portland, Oregon
(Portland)
Merlo Field North Carolina (12)5–0 Notre Dame Connecticut, Portland 5,000
1995
Details
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
(North Carolina)
Fetzer FieldNotre Dame1–0
(3OT)
PortlandNorth Carolina, SMU 6,926
1996
Details
Santa Clara, California
(Santa Clara)
Buck Shaw Stadium North Carolina (13)1–0
(2OT)
Notre DamePortland, Santa Clara8,800
1997
Details
Greensboro, North Carolina
(UNC Greensboro)
UNCG Soccer Stadium North Carolina (14)2–0ConnecticutNotre Dame, Santa Clara3,200
1998
Details
Florida 1–0North CarolinaPortland, Santa Clara10,583
1999
Details
San Jose, California
(San Jose State)
Spartan Stadium North Carolina (15)2–0Notre Dame Penn State, Santa Clara14,410
2000
Details
North Carolina (16)2–1 UCLA Notre Dame, Portland9,566
2001
Details
University Park, Texas
(SMU)
Gerald J. Ford Stadium Santa Clara1–0North CarolinaFlorida, Portland7,090
2002
Details
Austin, Texas
(Texas)
Mike A. Myers Stadium Portland2–1
(OT)
Santa ClaraNorth Carolina, Penn State10,027
2003
Details
Cary, North Carolina SAS Soccer Park North Carolina (17)6–0Connecticut Florida State, UCLA10,042
2004
Details
Notre Dame (2)1–1
(4–3 pen)
UCLA Princeton, Santa Clara7,644
2005
Details
College Station, Texas
(Texas A&M)
Aggie Soccer StadiumPortland (2)4–0UCLAFlorida State, Penn State6,578
2006
Details
Cary, North CarolinaSAS Soccer ParkNorth Carolina (18)2–1Notre DameFlorida State, UCLA8,349
2007
Details
College Station, Texas
(Texas A&M)
Aggie Soccer Stadium USC 2–0Florida StateNotre Dame, UCLA8,255
2008
Details
Cary, North Carolina WakeMed Soccer Park North Carolina (19)2–1Notre DameStanford, UCLA9,055
2009
Details
College Station, Texas
(Texas A&M)
Aggie Soccer StadiumNorth Carolina (20)1–0StanfordNotre Dame, UCLA8,536
2010
Details
Cary, North CarolinaWakeMed Soccer ParkNotre Dame (3)1–0Stanford Boston College, Ohio State 7,833
2011
Details
Kennesaw, Georgia
(Kennesaw State)
Kennesaw State University Soccer Stadium Stanford1–0DukeFlorida State, Wake Forest 9,241
2012
Details
San Diego
(San Diego)
Torero Stadium North Carolina (21)4–1Penn StateFlorida State, Stanford7,289
2013
Details
Cary, North CarolinaWakeMed Soccer ParkUCLA1–0
(OT)
Florida StateVirginia, Virginia Tech 8,806*
2014
Details
Boca Raton, Florida
(Florida Atlantic)
FAU Stadium Florida State1–0VirginiaStanford, Texas A&M 4,137
2015
Details
Cary, North CarolinaWakeMed Soccer Park Penn State 1–0DukeFlorida State, Rutgers 10,676
2016
Details
San Jose, California Avaya Stadium USC (2)3–1 West Virginia Georgetown, North Carolina6,612
2017
Details
Orlando, Florida Orlando City Stadium Stanford (2)3-2UCLA South Carolina, Duke1,938
2018
Details
Cary, North Carolina WakeMed Soccer Park Florida State (2)1–0North CarolinaStanford, Georgetown12,512

Team titles

TeamNumberYears won
North Carolina 21 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2003 2006, 2008, 2009, 2012
Notre Dame 3 1995, 2004, 2010
Portland 2 2002, 2005
USC 2 2007, 2016
Stanford 2 2011, 2017
Florida State 2 2014, 2018
Florida 1 1998
George Mason 1 1985
Penn State 1 2015
Santa Clara 1 2001
UCLA 1 2013

College Cup Appearances

No.SchoolCollege Cup YearsNCAA AppearancesChampionships
28 North Carolina 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2016, 20183321
12 Notre Dame 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010203
10 Santa Clara 1989, 1990, 1992, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2004221
10 Florida State 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2018172
10 UCLA 2000, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2013, 2017171
9 Stanford 1993, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2017, 2018242
8 Portland 1994, 1995, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2005192
7 Connecticut 1982, 1983, 1984, 1990, 1994, 1997, 2003290
6 Massachusetts 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1993150
5 Colorado College 1985, 1986, 1989, 1990, 199190
5 Penn State 1999, 2002, 2005, 2012, 2015211
4 George Mason 1983, 1985, 1986, 1993111
3 California 1984, 1987, 1988200
3 Virginia 1991, 2013, 2014250
4 Duke 1992, 2011, 2015, 2017180
2 Florida 1998, 2001161
2 NC State 1988, 1989110
2 UCF 1982, 1987170
2 USC 2007, 2016142
2 Wisconsin 1988, 1991170
1 Boston College 2010150
2 Georgetown 2016, 201870
1 Hartford 1992130
1 Ohio State 201070
1 Princeton 200490
1 Rutgers 2015100
1 SMU 1995120
1 Texas A&M 2014200
1 UMSL 198220
1 Virginia Tech 201380
1 Wake Forest 2011160
1 West Virginia 2016170
1 South Carolina 2017110

See also

NCAA Division II Womens Soccer Championship

The NCAA Division II Women's Soccer Championship is an American intercollegiate college soccer tournament conducted by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) to determine the Division II women's national champion.

NCAA Division III Womens Soccer Championship

The NCAA Division III Women's Soccer Championship is an American intercollegiate college soccer tournament conducted by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) to determine the Division III national champion. It has been held annually since 1986 when the Division III championship was established for universities that do not award athletics scholarships. A third Division II championship was added in 1988.

The NCAA held its first men's National Collegiate Soccer Championship in 1959, with eight teams selected for the tournament. Before 1959, national champions were selected by a committee of the Intercollegiate Soccer Football Association (ISFA) based on season records and competition. In addition, the College Soccer Bowl tournament was held from 1950–1952 for the purpose of deciding a national champion on the field. The Soccer Bowl was a one-site competition involving four teams selected by college soccer administrators. However, the ISFA committee continued to select the national champion in those three years.

Notes and references

    Related Research Articles

    The Women's College World Series (WCWS) is the final portion of the NCAA Division I Softball Championship for college softball in the United States. The tournament format consists of two four-team double-elimination brackets. The winners of each bracket then compete in a best-of-three series to determine the Division I WCWS National Champion. The WCWS takes place at ASA Hall of Fame Stadium in Oklahoma City. From 1969 to 1981, the women's collegiate softball championship was also known as the Women's College World Series and was promoted as such. During 1969–1979, the series was played in Omaha, and in 1980–1982 in Norman, Oklahoma. The NCAA held its first six Division I tournaments in Omaha in 1982–1987, followed by Sunnyvale, California in 1988–1989. The event has been held in Oklahoma City every year since then, except for 1996 in Columbus, Georgia.

    Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women US womens college sports association

    The Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) was founded in 1971 to govern collegiate women's athletics in the United States and to administer national championships. It evolved out of the Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics for Women. The association was one of the biggest advancements for women's athletics on the collegiate level. Throughout the 1970s, the AIAW grew rapidly in membership and influence, in parallel with the national growth of women's sports following the enactment of Title IX. The AIAW functioned in the equivalent role for college women's programs that the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) had been doing for men's programs. Owing to its own success, the AIAW was in a vulnerable position that precipitated conflicts with the NCAA in the early 1980s. Following a one-year overlap in which both organizations staged women's championships, the AIAW discontinued operation, and most member schools continued their women's athletics programs under the governance of the NCAA.

    NCAA Division II Womens Basketball Tournament

    The NCAA Division II Women's Basketball Tournament is an annual tournament to determine the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II women's college basketball national champion. Basketball was one of 12 women's sports added to the NCAA championship program for the 1981–82 school year, as the NCAA and Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) sought for sole governance of women's collegiate athletics. The AIAW continued to conduct its established championships; however, after a year of dual women's championships at the national level, the AIAW disbanded.

    The NCAA Women's Soccer Championship refers to one of three championships in women's soccer contested by the NCAA since 1981:

    The NCAA Women's Volleyball Championship refers to one of three championships in women's indoor volleyball contested by the NCAA since 1981:

    UC Santa Barbara Gauchos

    The UC Santa Barbara Gauchos are the intercollegiate athletic teams of student-athletes who represent the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), although the term is colloquially used to refer to other aspects of the university such as alumni, faculty, and students. The Gauchos participate in 19 NCAA Division I intercollegiate sports with the majority competing in the Big West Conference.

    Denver Pioneers

    The Denver Pioneers are the sports teams of the University of Denver (DU). They play in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I, Denver is a member of The Summit League for men's and women's basketball, swimming and diving, men's and women's soccer, tennis and golf for both men and women, plus women's volleyball. Other DU teams play in various conferences in the sports that are not sponsored by The Summit. The men's ice hockey team is a charter member of the National Collegiate Hockey Conference (NCHC), which formed in 2011 with play beginning in 2013. The lacrosse teams for men and women are members of the Big East Conference; the men began Big East play in the 2013–14 school year, while the women left the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation (MPSF) after the 2016 lacrosse season. Men's and women's skiing compete in the Rocky Mountain Intercollegiate Ski Association, while the women's gymnastics team became an affiliate of the Big 12 Conference starting with the 2015–16 season.

    Chico State Wildcats

    The Chico State Wildcats also known as the Harvard of the west are the athletic teams that represent California State University, Chico, located in Chico, California, in NCAA Division II intercollegiate sports. The Wildcats compete as an associate member of the California Collegiate Athletic Association for all 13 varsity sports. Since 1998, Chico State’s athletic teams have won 99 NCAA Championship berths, 40 CCAA titles, 24 West Region titles, and 15 National titles. The school finished third in the 2004–2005 NACDA Director's Cup.

    Cal State Fullerton Titans

    The Cal State Fullerton Titans are the athletic teams that represent California State University, Fullerton. The Titans are a member of the NCAA Division I level. The Titans compete within the Big West Conference (BWC) for most sports, wrestling competes as a member of the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12) and gymnastics competes as a member of the Western Athletic Conference (WAC). CSUF has won 13 national championships in eight different sports.

    Cal State Northridge Matadors

    The Cal State Northridge Matadors are the athletic teams that represent California State University, Northridge in Northridge, Los Angeles, California. The Matadors field 17 teams in nineteen sports.

    UC Riverside Highlanders

    The UC Riverside Highlanders represent the University of California, Riverside in Riverside, California in intercollegiate athletics. They field fifteen teams including men and women's basketball, cross country, golf, soccer, tennis, and track and field, women's-only softball and volleyball, and men's-only baseball. A football team had been fielded, but the program was discontinued in 1975. The Highlanders compete in NCAA Division I; they are members of the Big West Conference.

    Cal State East Bay Pioneers

    The Cal State East Bay Pioneers are the athletic teams that represent California State University, East Bay, located in Hayward, California, in NCAA Division II intercollegiate sports. The Pioneers compete as members of the California Collegiate Athletic Association for all 15 varsity sports except for women's water polo, which competes in the Western Water Polo Association.

    NCAA Womens Division II Tennis Championship

    The NCAA Division II Women's Tennis Championship is the National Collegiate Athletic Association's tennis tournament to determine the Team Championships, Singles Championships, and Doubles Championships for women's tennis athletes from Division II institutions. Tennis was one of twelve women's sports added to the NCAA championship program for the 1981-82 school year, as the NCAA engaged in battle with the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women for sole governance of women's collegiate sports. The AIAW continued to conduct its established championship program in the same twelve sports; however, after a year of dual women's championships, the NCAA conquered the AIAW and usurped its authority and membership.

    NCAA Division I Womens Volleyball Tournament

    The NCAA Division I Women's Volleyball Tournament is an annual event that leads to the championship in women's volleyball from teams in Division I contested by the NCAA each winter since 1981. Stanford won the most recent tournament, defeating Nebraska 3-2 at the Target Center in Minneapolis.

    NCAA Division II Womens Volleyball Tournament

    The NCAA Division II Women's Volleyball Tournament is the annual event that decides the championship contested by the NCAA. It determines the national champion of Division II women's collegiate volleyball. It has been held annually since 1981, typically played in December after the fall regular season.

    NCAA Division III Womens Volleyball Tournament

    The NCAA Division III Women's Volleyball Tournament is the annual event that decides the championships in women's volleyball from teams in Division III contested by the NCAA each winter since 1981.