NCAA Women's Soccer Championship

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The NCAA Women's Soccer Championship refers to one of three championships in women's soccer contested by the NCAA since 1981:

In sport, a championship is a competition in which the aim is to decide which individual or team is the champion.

National Collegiate Athletic Association Non-profit organization that regulates many American college athletes and programs

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is a non-profit organization which regulates athletes of 1,268 North American institutions and conferences. It also organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, and helps more than 480,000 college student-athletes who compete annually in college sports. The organization is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana.

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NCAA Division I Womens Soccer Championship

The NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Championship, sometimes known as the Women's College Cup, is an American college soccer tournament conducted by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), and determines the Division I women's national champion.

NCAA Division II Womens Soccer Championship

The NCAA Division II Women's Soccer Championship is an American intercollegiate college soccer tournament conducted by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) to determine the Division II women's national champion.

NCAA Division III Womens Soccer Championship

The NCAA Division III Women's Soccer Championship is an American intercollegiate college soccer tournament conducted by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) to determine the Division III national champion. It has been held annually since 1986 when the Division III championship was established for universities that do not award athletics scholarships. A third Division II championship was added in 1988.

The NCAA began conducting a single division Women's Soccer Championship tournament in 1982 with a 12-team tournament. The tournament became the Division I Championship in 1986, when Division III was created for non-scholarship programs. Division II was added in 1988. Currently, the tournament fields consists of 64 teams in Divisions I and III and 48 teams in Division II. Early rounds are played at campus sites, while each division's semifinals and finals, known as the Women's College Cup (analogous to the College Cup in men's soccer). are played at a single location. [1]

See also

The NCAA held its first men's National Collegiate Soccer Championship in 1959, with eight teams selected for the tournament. Before 1959, national champions were selected by a committee of the Intercollegiate Soccer Football Association (ISFA) based on season records and competition. In addition, the College Soccer Bowl tournament was held from 1950–1952 for the purpose of deciding a national champion on the field. The Soccer Bowl was a one-site competition involving four teams selected by college soccer administrators. However, the ISFA committee continued to select the national champion in those three years.

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College soccer form of soccer

College soccer is played by teams composed of soccer players who are enrolled in colleges and universities. While it is most widespread in the United States, it is also prominent in South Korea and Canada. The institutions typically hire full-time professional coaches and staff, although the student athletes are strictly amateur and are not paid. College soccer in the United States is sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), the sports regulatory body for major universities, and by the governing bodies for smaller universities and colleges. This sport is played on a rectangular field of the dimensions of about 64m (meters) - 70m sideline to sideline (width), and 100m - 110m goal line to goal line (length).

NCAA tournament may refer to a number of tournaments organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association:

NCAA Division II Mens Soccer Championship

The NCAA Division II Men's Soccer Championship is the annual tournament held by the NCAA to determine the top men's Division II college soccer program in the United States. It has been played annually since 1972; prior to then, all teams competed in a single class.

The NCAA Division III Men's Soccer Championship is an annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division III collegiate men's soccer in the United States.

Longwood Lancers

The Longwood Lancers are the varsity athletic teams representing Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia in intercollegiate athletics. The university sponsors fourteen teams, which compete in NCAA Division I and became members of the Big South Conference in July 2012 after upgrading from NCAA Division II during the 2004–05 season. In women's field hockey, a sport not sponsored by the Big South, Longwood is an associate member of the Mid-American Conference as of the 2014–15 school year.

The NCAA Division II Men's Lacrosse Championship is the annual championship in men's lacrosse held by the NCAA for teams competing in Division II.

The 2001 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 20th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semifinals and championship game were played at Southern Methodist University's Gerald J. Ford Stadium in University Park, Texas from December 5–7, 2001.

The 2002 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 21st annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semifinals and championship game were played at Mike A. Myers Stadium in Austin, Texas from December 6–8, 2002.

The 2003 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 22nd annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semifinals and championship game were played at SAS Soccer Park in Cary, North Carolina from December 5–7, 2003.

The 2004 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 23rd annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semifinals and championship game were played at SAS Soccer Park in Cary, North Carolina from December 3–5, 2004.

The 2005 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 24th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semifinals and championship game were played at Aggie Soccer Complex in College Station, Texas from December 2–4, 2005 while the preceding rounds were played at various sites across the country from November 10–25.

The 2006 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 25th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semifinals and championship game were played at SAS Soccer Park in Cary, North Carolina from December 1–3, 2006 while the preceding rounds were played at various sites across the country from November 8–25.

The 2007 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 26th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semifinals and championship game were played at Aggie Soccer Complex in College Station, Texas from December 7–9, 2007 while the preceding rounds were played at various sites across the country from November 15–30.

The 2009 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 28th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semifinals and championship game were played at the Aggie Soccer Complex in College Station, Texas from December 4–6, 2009 while the preceding rounds were played at various sites across the country from November 12–28.

The 2010 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 29th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semifinals and championship game were played at WakeMed Soccer Park in Cary, North Carolina from December 3–5, 2010 while the preceding rounds were played at various sites across the country from November 12–28.

The 2011 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 30th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semifinals and championship game were played at Kennesaw State University Soccer Stadium in Kennesaw, Georgia from December 2–4, 2011 while the preceding rounds were played at various sites across the country from November 11–27.

The 2013 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 32nd annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semifinals and championship game were played at WakeMed Soccer Park in Cary, North Carolina from December 6–8, 2013 while the preceding rounds were played at various sites across the country from November 15–30.

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