NFC East

Last updated

NFC East
Conference National Football Conference
League National Football League
Sport American football
Founded1967 (as the NFL Eastern Conference Capitol Division)
No. of teams4
Country United States
Most recent
champion(s)
Dallas Cowboys
(25th title)
Most titles Dallas Cowboys
(25 titles)
NFC East
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800km
500miles
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Giants
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Eagles
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Cowboys
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Commanders
NFC East Teams Location

The National Football Conference – Eastern Division or NFC East is one of the four divisions of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). It currently has four members: the Dallas Cowboys, New York Giants, Philadelphia Eagles, and the Washington Commanders.

Contents

The division was formed in 1967 as the National Football League Capitol Division and acquired its current name in 1970 when the NFL merged with the American Football League. The NFC East is currently the only division in the league in which all four current teams have won at least one Super Bowl. [1] With 13 Super Bowl titles, the NFC East is currently the most successful division in the NFL during the Super Bowl era, with the AFC West second with ten titles. The NFC East currently has the longest streak without a consecutive division champion, with no team having repeated since the Philadelphia Eagles won four consecutive titles from 2001 to 2004. [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

History

The division's original name, NFL Capitol Division, derived from being centered on the capital of the United States, Washington, D.C., and the country's birthplace, Philadelphia. In 1967 and 1969, the teams in the division were Dallas, Philadelphia, Washington and the expansion team New Orleans Saints, with the New York Giants swapping divisions with the Saints for the 1968 season. This arrangement had been agreed in advance as a means to ensure all of the NFL's teams would be able to visit New York once in those three years. With the merger in 1970, following contentious negotiations culminating in a random draw, it was agreed that New York (along with the St. Louis Cardinals) would permanently return to the re-branded NFC East.

The NFC East has a long history of being geographically inaccurate. While the New York Giants, Philadelphia, and Washington are based on the East Coast, Dallas and St. Louis (later Phoenix, then Arizona) remained part of the East from the 1970 merger until 2002 despite being geographically west of most teams in the conference and closer to the Pacific Ocean.

To begin with, the Cowboys were located east of only two NFC teams that were outside of the East division (Los Angeles Rams and San Francisco 49ers from the West division), while the Cardinals were east of one additional such team (Minnesota Vikings from the Central division). The Tampa Bay Buccaneers, east of Dallas and St. Louis, joined the Central as an expansion team in 1976. The Cardinals relocated to Phoenix to start the 1988 season and stayed in the East through 2001; that made them located west of every team in the NFC except for the Rams and 49ers. The Rams relocated from Los Angeles to St. Louis to start the 1995 season and stayed in the West, while the Carolina Panthers joined the West as an expansion team that same season; this made the Cardinals and Cowboys west of every team in the conference, except for the 49ers, from 1995 to 2001.

While the divisions in general have been much more geographically accurate since 2002, even following the Rams' return to Los Angeles, the Cowboys are further west than every team in the league except for seven of the eight West teams in both conferences, in addition to the Kansas City Chiefs of the AFC West.

General information

The NFC East teams have combined to be the most successful division in the Super Bowl era with 21 NFC championships and 13 Super Bowl victories, the highest marks of any division in the NFL. The division features a number of prominent rivalries such as the Cowboys–Eagles rivalry, Cowboys–Washington rivalry and Eagles–Giants rivalry, among others. Because the division's teams are in some of the United States' largest media markets (New York No. 1, Philadelphia No. 4, Dallas-Fort Worth No. 5, and Washington No. 9), the NFC East receives a high amount of coverage from national sports media outlets. [7] In the early 1990s the division claimed four consecutive Super Bowl champions, all against the Buffalo Bills, with the Giants and Washington respectively winning back-to-back in Super Bowls XXV and XXVI; and the Cowboys winning twice after in Super Bowls XXVII and XXVIII. Those same three teams won seven out of ten Super Bowls, from 1986–87 to 1995–96 (the 49ers won the other three during that span). Meanwhile, the Eagles are the most recent team in the division to win a Super Bowl, beating the Patriots 41–33 in Super Bowl LII.

The NFC East was the first division since the 2002 realignment to send 3 teams to the playoffs when the 2006-07 NFL playoffs had Philadelphia winning the division and Dallas and New York taking both Wild Card spots. On the other hand, the NFC East became one of three divisions to be won by a team with a losing record (the previous two being the NFC South and NFC West) when the then-Washington Football Team won the 2020 division crown with a 7-9 record.

The Philadelphia Eagles are the only NFC East team to actually play in the city of the team's naming. [8] The other three teams play in suburbs of the major cities they are named after. The Dallas Cowboys play in Arlington, Texas, and are the only team in this division not based in the Eastern Time Zone (the Cowboys are based in the Central Time Zone). [9] The Washington Commanders play in Landover, Maryland, [10] and the New York Giants play in East Rutherford, New Jersey, [11] where they share a stadium with the New York Jets. Analogously, three of the four AFC East teams do not actually play within the city of their naming. (The Patriots geographical identifier is New England, being named for the region the team plays in.)

As of 2023, all four teams in the division were in the top ten of most valuable NFL franchises (Cowboys #1; Giants #2; Commanders #7; Eagles #9). [12]

Division lineups

Place cursor over year for division champion.

NFL Eastern Conference
Capitol Division
NFC East Division [B]
1900s2000s
67 [A] 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 [C] 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01
Dallas Cowboys
Philadelphia Eagles
Washington Redskins
N.O. SaintsNY Giants N.O. SaintsNew York Giants
  St. Louis Cardinals [C] Phoenix CardinalsArizona Cardinals [D]
NFC East Division [E]
2000s
02 03 04 05 06 07 [F] 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 2425
Dallas Cowboys
Philadelphia Eagles
Washington RedskinsWashington Football TeamWashington Commanders
New York Giants
 Team not in division Division Won Super Bowl Division Won NFC Championship
A The Eastern Conference was divided into the Capitol and Century Divisions. Dallas, Philadelphia, and Washington moved in. Also, the New Orleans Saints joined the league.
B The Capitol Division adopts its current name. New Orleans realigned to the NFC West. The Giants and Cardinals are added from the Century Division.
C Although the Cardinals were division champions, the Cowboys won the NFC Championship as a wild card qualifier.
D St. Louis moved to Phoenix in 1988. The team changed its name from Phoenix Cardinals to the Arizona Cardinals in 1994.
E Arizona moved to the NFC West when the league realigned into eight four-team divisions before the 2002 season.
F Although the Cowboys were division champions, the Giants won the Super Bowl as a wild card qualifier.

Division champions

As NFL Capitol Division

SeasonTeamRecordPlayoff Results
NFL Capitol
1967 Dallas Cowboys (1) 9–5Won Conference playoffs (Browns) 52–14
Lost NFL Championship Game (at Packers) 17–21
1968 Dallas Cowboys (2) 12–2Lost Conference playoffs (at Browns) 20–31
1969 Dallas Cowboys (3) 11–2–1Lost Conference playoffs (Browns) 14–38

There was one division sweep of the Capitol Division: the 1969 Cowboys went 6–0 in division matchups. [13]

The NFC East

No team has repeated as division champion since 2004, the longest such streak in NFL history.

SeasonTeamRecordPlayoff Results
1970 Dallas Cowboys (4) 10–4Won Divisional playoffs (Lions) 5–0
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 17–10
Lost Super Bowl V (vs. Colts) 13–16
1971 Dallas Cowboys (5) 11–3Won Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 20–12
Won NFC Championship (49ers) 14–3
Won Super Bowl VI (vs. Dolphins) 24–3
1972 Washington Redskins (1) 11–3Won Divisional playoffs (Packers) 16–3
Won NFC Championship (Cowboys) 26–3
Lost Super Bowl VII (vs. Dolphins) 7–14
1973 Dallas Cowboys (6) 10–4Won Divisional playoffs (Rams) 27–16
Lost NFC Championship (Vikings) 10–27
1974 St. Louis Cardinals (1) 10–4Lost Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 14–30
1975 St. Louis Cardinals (2) 11–3Lost Divisional playoffs (at Rams) 23–35
1976 Dallas Cowboys (7) 11–3Lost Divisional playoffs (Rams) 12–14
1977 Dallas Cowboys (8) 12–2Won Divisional playoffs (Bears) 37–7
Won NFC Championship (Vikings) 23–6
Won Super Bowl XII (vs. Broncos) 27–10
1978 Dallas Cowboys (9) 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Falcons) 27–20
Won NFC Championship (at Rams) 28–0
Lost Super Bowl XIII (vs. Steelers) 31–35
1979 Dallas Cowboys (10) 11–5Lost Divisional playoffs (Rams) 19–21
1980 Philadelphia Eagles (1) 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Vikings) 31–16
Won NFC Championship (Cowboys) 20–7
Lost Super Bowl XV (vs. Raiders) 10–27
1981 Dallas Cowboys (11) 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Buccaneers) 38–0
Lost NFC Championship (at 49ers) 27–28
1982* Washington Redskins* 8–1Won First Round playoffs (Lions) 31–7
Won Second Round playoffs (Vikings) 21–7
Won NFC Championship (Cowboys) 31–17
Won Super Bowl XVII (vs. Dolphins) 27–17
1983 Washington Redskins (2) 14–2Won Divisional playoffs (Rams) 51–7
Won NFC Championship (49ers) 24–21
Lost Super Bowl XVIII (vs. Raiders) 9–38
1984 Washington Redskins (3) 11–5Lost Divisional playoffs (Bears) 19–23
1985 Dallas Cowboys (12) 10–6Lost Divisional playoffs (at Rams) 0–20
1986 New York Giants (1) 14–2Won Divisional playoffs (49ers) 49–3
Won NFC Championship (Redskins) 17–0
Won Super Bowl XXI (vs. Broncos) 39–20
1987 Washington Redskins (4) 11–4Won Divisional playoffs (at Bears) 21–17
Won NFC Championship (Vikings) 17–10
Won Super Bowl XXII (vs. Broncos) 42–10
1988 Philadelphia Eagles (2) 10–6Lost Divisional playoffs (at Bears) 12–20
1989 New York Giants (2) 12–4Lost Divisional playoffs (Rams) 13–19 (OT)
1990 New York Giants (3) 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Bears) 31–3
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 15–13
Won Super Bowl XXV (vs. Bills) 20–19
1991 Washington Redskins (5) 14–2Won Divisional playoffs (Falcons) 24–7
Won NFC Championship (Lions) 41–10
Won Super Bowl XXVI (vs. Bills) 37–24
1992 Dallas Cowboys (13) 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Eagles) 34–10
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 30–20
Won Super Bowl XXVII (vs. Bills) 52–17
1993 Dallas Cowboys (14) 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Packers) 27–17
Won NFC Championship (49ers) 38–21
Won Super Bowl XXVIII (vs. Bills) 30–13
1994 Dallas Cowboys (15) 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Packers) 35–9
Lost NFC Championship (at 49ers) 28–38
1995 Dallas Cowboys (16) 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Eagles) 30–11
Won NFC Championship (Packers) 38–27
Won Super Bowl XXX (5) (vs. Steelers) 27–17
1996 Dallas Cowboys (17) 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Vikings) 40–15
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Panthers) 17–26
1997 New York Giants (4) 10–5–1Lost Wild Card playoffs (Vikings) 22–23
1998 Dallas Cowboys (18) 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (Cardinals) 7–20
1999 Washington Redskins (6) 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Lions) 27–13
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Buccaneers) 13–14
2000 New York Giants (5) 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Eagles) 20–10
Won NFC Championship (Vikings) 41–0
Lost Super Bowl XXXV (vs. Ravens) 7–34
2001 Philadelphia Eagles (3) 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (Buccaneers) 31–9
Won Divisional playoffs (at Bears) 33–19
Lost NFC Championship (at Rams) 24–29
NFC East
2002 Philadelphia Eagles (4) 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Falcons) 20–6
Lost NFC Championship (Buccaneers) 10–27
2003 Philadelphia Eagles (5) 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Packers) 20–17 (OT)
Lost NFC Championship (Panthers) 3–14
2004 Philadelphia Eagles (6) 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Vikings) 27–14
Won NFC Championship (Falcons) 27–10
Lost Super Bowl XXXIX (vs. Patriots) 21–24
2005 New York Giants (6) 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (Panthers) 0–23
2006 Philadelphia Eagles (7) 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Giants) 23–20
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Saints) 24–27
2007 Dallas Cowboys (19) 13–3Lost Divisional playoffs (Giants) 17–21
2008 New York Giants (7) 12–4Lost Divisional playoffs (Eagles) 11–23
2009 Dallas Cowboys (20) 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (Eagles) 34–14
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 3–34
2010 Philadelphia Eagles (8) 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (Packers) 16–21
2011 New York Giants (8) 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (Falcons) 24–2
Won Divisional playoffs (at Packers) 37–20
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 20–17 (OT)
Won Super Bowl XLVI (vs. Patriots) 21–17
2012 Washington Redskins (7) 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (Seahawks) 14–24
2013 Philadelphia Eagles (9) 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (Saints) 24–26
2014 Dallas Cowboys (21) 12–4Won Wild Card playoffs (Lions) 24–20
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Packers) 21–26
2015 Washington Redskins (8) 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (Packers) 18–35
2016 Dallas Cowboys (22) 13–3Lost Divisional playoffs (Packers) 31–34
2017 Philadelphia Eagles (10) 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Falcons) 15–10
Won NFC Championship (Vikings) 38–7
Won Super Bowl LII (vs. Patriots) 41–33
2018 Dallas Cowboys (23) 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Seahawks) 24–22
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Rams) 22–30
2019 Philadelphia Eagles (11) 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (Seahawks) 9–17
2020 Washington Football Team (9) 7–9Lost Wild Card playoffs (Buccaneers) 23–31
2021 Dallas Cowboys (24) 12–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (49ers) 17–23
2022 Philadelphia Eagles (12) 14–3Won Divisional playoffs (Giants) 38–7
Won NFC Championship (49ers) 31–7
Lost Super Bowl LVII (vs. Chiefs) 35–38
2023 Dallas Cowboys (25) 12–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (Packers) 32–48

All four teams in the NFC East have won the Super Bowl. The Cowboys lead with five, followed by the Giants with four, Washington with three, and the Eagles with one. In overall NFL history, however, the Giants lead with eight league championships, followed by the Cowboys and Washington with five each, then the Eagles with four.

There have been three division sweeps of the NFC East Division, the 1998 Dallas Cowboys (8–0), the 2004 Philadelphia Eagles (6–0), and the 2021 Dallas Cowboys (6–0). [13]

Wild Card qualifiers

SeasonTeamRecordPlayoff Results
NFC East
1971 Washington Redskins 9–4–1Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 20–24
1972 Dallas Cowboys 10–4Won Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 30–28
Lost NFC Championship (at Redskins) 3–26
1973 Washington Redskins 10–4Lost Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 20–27
1974 Washington Redskins 10–4Lost Divisional playoffs (at Rams) 10–19
1975 Dallas Cowboys 10–4Won Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 17–14
Won NFC Championship (at Rams) 37–7
Lost Super Bowl X (vs. Steelers) 17–21
1976 Washington Redskins 10–4Lost Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 20–35
1978 Philadelphia Eagles 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Falcons) 13–14
1979 Philadelphia Eagles 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (Bears) 27–17
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Buccaneers) 17–24
1980 Dallas Cowboys 12–4Won Wild Card playoffs (Rams) 34–13
Won Divisional playoffs (at Falcons) 30–27
Lost NFC Championship (at Eagles) 7–20
1981 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (Giants) 21–27
New York Giants 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (at Eagles) 27–21
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 24–38
1982+ Dallas Cowboys 6–3Won First Round playoffs (Buccaneers) 30–17
Won Second Round playoffs (Packers) 37–26
Lost NFC Championship (at Redskins) 17–31
St. Louis Cardinals 5–4Lost First Round playoffs (at Packers) 16–41
1983 Dallas Cowboys 12–4Lost Wild Card playoffs (Rams) 17–24
1984 New York Giants 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (at Rams) 16–13
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 10–21
1985 New York Giants 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (49ers) 17–3
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Bears) 0–21
1986 Washington Redskins 12–4Won Wild Card playoffs (Rams) 19–7
Won Divisional playoffs (at Bears) 27–13
Lost NFC Championship (at Giants) 0–17
1989 Philadelphia Eagles 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (Rams) 7–21
1990 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (Redskins) 6–20
Washington Redskins 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (at Eagles) 20–6
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 10–28
1991 Dallas Cowboys 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (at Bears) 17–13
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Lions) 6–38
1992 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (at Saints) 36–20
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Cowboys) 10–34
Washington Redskins 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (at Vikings) 24–7
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 13–20
1993 New York Giants 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (Vikings) 17–10
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 3–44
1995 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Lions) 58–37
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Cowboys) 11–30
1996 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at 49ers) 0–14
1998 Arizona Cardinals 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (at Cowboys) 20–7
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 21–41
1999 Dallas Cowboys 8–8Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Vikings) 10–27
2000 Philadelphia Eagles 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (Buccaneers) 21–3
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Giants) 10–20
NFC East
2002 New York Giants 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at 49ers) 38–39
2003 Dallas Cowboys 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Panthers) 10–29
2005 Washington Redskins 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (at Buccaneers) 17–10
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Seahawks) 10–20
2006 Dallas Cowboys 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Seahawks) 20–21
New York Giants 8–8Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Eagles) 20–23
2007 New York Giants 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (at Buccaneers) 24–14
Won Divisional playoffs (at Cowboys) 21–17
Won NFC Championship (at Packers) 23–20 (OT)
Won Super Bowl XLII (vs. Patriots) 17–14
Washington Redskins 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Seahawks) 14–35
2008 Philadelphia Eagles 9–6–1Won Wild Card playoffs (at Vikings) 26–14
Won Divisional playoffs (at Giants) 23–11
Lost NFC Championship (at Cardinals) 25–32
2009 Philadelphia Eagles 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Cowboys) 14–34
2016 New York Giants 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Packers) 13–38
2018 Philadelphia Eagles 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (at Bears) 16–15
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Saints) 14–20
2021 Philadelphia Eagles 9–8Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Buccaneers) 15–31
2022 Dallas Cowboys 12–5Won Wild Card playoffs (at Buccaneers) 31–14
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 12–19
New York Giants 9–7–1Won Wild Card playoffs (at Vikings) 31–24
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Eagles) 7–38
2023 Philadelphia Eagles 11–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Buccaneers) 9–32

Total playoff berths since 1967

TeamDivision
Championships
Playoff
Berths
Super Bowl
Appearances
Super Bowl
Championships
Dallas Cowboys 253485
Philadelphia Eagles 122441
Washington Commanders 91953
New York Giants 81654
Arizona Cardinals 12400

To sort table above, click button to right of heading.

NFC EastDivision
Championships
Playoff
Berths
NFC
Championships
Super Bowl
Championships
Totals- 1967-202255962213
1These numbers only reflect the Cardinals' time as a member of the NFC East, as the team realigned to the NFC West after the 2001 season.

Season results

(#)Denotes team that won the Super Bowl
(#)Denotes team that won the NFC Championship
(#)Denotes team that qualified for the NFL Playoffs
SeasonTeam (record)
1st2nd3rd4th5th
NFL Capitol
1967 Dallas (9–5) Philadelphia (6–7–1) Washington (5–6–3) New Orleans (3–11)
1968 Dallas (12–2) N.Y. Giants (7–7) Washington (5–9) Philadelphia (2–12)
1969 Dallas (11–2–1) Washington (7–5–2) New Orleans (5–9) Philadelphia (4–9–1)
NFC East
1970 Dallas (10–4) N.Y. Giants (9–5) St. Louis (8–5–1) Washington (6–8) Philadelphia (3–10–1)
1971 Dallas (11–3) Washington (9–4–1) Philadelphia (6–7–1) St. Louis (4–9–1) N.Y. Giants (4–10)
1972 Washington (11–3) Dallas (10–4) N.Y. Giants (8–6) St. Louis (4–9–1) Philadelphia (2–11–1)
1973 Dallas (10–4) Washington (10–4) Philadelphia (5–8–1) St. Louis (4–9–1) N.Y. Giants (2–11–1)
1974 St. Louis (10–4) Washington (10–4) Dallas (8–6) Philadelphia (7–7) N.Y. Giants (2–12)
1975 (3) St. Louis (11–3)(4) Dallas (10–4) Washington (8–6) N.Y. Giants (5–9) Philadelphia (4–10)
1976 (2) Dallas (11–3)(4) Washington (10–4) St. Louis (10–4) Philadelphia (4–10) N.Y. Giants (3–11)
1977 (1) Dallas (12–2) Washington (9–5) St. Louis (7–7) Philadelphia (5–9) N.Y. Giants (5–9)
1978 (2) Dallas (12–4)(5) Philadelphia (9–7) Washington (8–8) St. Louis (6–10) N.Y. Giants (6–10)
1979 (1) Dallas (11–5)(4) Philadelphia (11–5) Washington (10–6) N.Y. Giants (6–10) St. Louis (5–11)
1980 (2) Philadelphia (12–4)(4) Dallas (12–4) Washington (6–10) St. Louis (5–11) N.Y. Giants (4–12)
1981 (2) Dallas (12–4)(4) Philadelphia (10–6)(5) N.Y. Giants (9–7) Washington (8–8) St. Louis (7–9)
1982^(1) Washington (8–1)(2) Dallas (6–3)(6) St. Louis (5–4) N.Y. Giants (4–5) Philadelphia (3–6)
1983 (1) Washington (14–2)(4) Dallas (12–4) St. Louis (8–7–1) Philadelphia (5–11) N.Y. Giants (3–12–1)
1984 (2) Washington (11–5)(5) N.Y. Giants (9–7) St. Louis (9–7) Dallas (9–7) Philadelphia (6–9–1)
1985 (3) Dallas (10–6)(4) N.Y. Giants (10–6) Washington (10–6) Philadelphia (7–9) St. Louis (5–11)
1986 (1) N.Y. Giants (14–2)(4) Washington (12–4) Dallas (7–9) Philadelphia (5–10–1) St. Louis (4–11–1)
1987 (3) Washington (11–4) Dallas (7–8) St. Louis (7–8) Philadelphia (7–8) N.Y. Giants (6–9)
1988 (3) Philadelphia (10–6) N.Y. Giants (10–6) Washington (7–9) Phoenix (7–9) Dallas (3–13)
1989 (2) N.Y. Giants (12–4)(4) Philadelphia (11–5) Washington (10–6) Phoenix (5–11) Dallas (1–15)
1990 (2) N.Y. Giants (13–3)(4) Philadelphia (10–6)(5) Washington (10–6) Dallas (7–9) Phoenix (5–11)
1991 (1) Washington (14–2)(5) Dallas (11–5) Philadelphia (10–6) N.Y. Giants (8–8) Phoenix (4–12)
1992 (2) Dallas (13–3)(5) Philadelphia (11–5)(6) Washington (9–7) N.Y. Giants (6–10) Phoenix (4–12)
1993 (1) Dallas (12–4)(4) N.Y. Giants (11–5) Philadelphia (8–8) Phoenix (7–9) Washington (4–12)
1994 (2) Dallas (12–4) N.Y. Giants (9–7) Arizona (8–8) Philadelphia (7–9) Washington (3–13)
1995 (1) Dallas (12–4)(4) Philadelphia (10–6) Washington (6–10) N.Y. Giants (5–11) Arizona (4–12)
1996 (3) Dallas (10–6)(5) Philadelphia (10–6) Washington (9–7) Arizona (7–9) N.Y. Giants (6–10)
1997 (3) N.Y. Giants (10–5–1) Washington (8–7–1) Philadelphia (6–9–1) Dallas (6–10) Arizona (4–12)
1998 (3) Dallas (10–6)(6) Arizona (9–7) N.Y. Giants (8–8) Washington (6–10) Philadelphia (3–13)
1999 (3) Washington (10–6)(5) Dallas (8–8) N.Y. Giants (7–9) Arizona (6–10) Philadelphia (5–11)
2000 (1) N.Y. Giants (12–4)(4) Philadelphia (11–5) Washington (8–8) Dallas (5–11) Arizona (3–13)
2001 (3) Philadelphia (11–5) Washington (8–8) N.Y. Giants (7–9) Arizona (7–9) Dallas (5–11)
2002 (1) Philadelphia (12–4)(5) N.Y. Giants (10–6) Washington (7–9) Dallas (5–11)
2003 (1) Philadelphia (12–4)(6) Dallas (10–6) Washington (5–11) N.Y. Giants (4–12)
2004 (1) Philadelphia (13–3) N.Y. Giants (6–10) Dallas (6–10) Washington (6–10)
2005 (4) N.Y. Giants (11–5)(6) Washington (10–6) Dallas (9–7) Philadelphia (6–10)
2006 (3) Philadelphia (10–6)(5) Dallas (9–7)(6) N.Y. Giants (8–8) Washington (5–11)
2007 (1) Dallas (13–3)(5) N.Y. Giants (10–6)(6) Washington (9–7) Philadelphia (8–8)
2008 (1) N.Y. Giants (12–4)(6) Philadelphia (9–6–1) Dallas (9–7) Washington (8–8)
2009 (3) Dallas (11–5)(6) Philadelphia (11–5) N.Y. Giants (8–8) Washington (4–12)
2010 (3) Philadelphia (10–6) N.Y. Giants (10–6) Dallas (6–10) Washington (6–10)
2011 (4) N.Y. Giants (9–7) Philadelphia (8–8) Dallas (8–8) Washington (5–11)
2012 (4) Washington (10–6) N.Y. Giants (9–7) Dallas (8–8) Philadelphia (4–12)
2013 (3) Philadelphia (10–6) Dallas (8–8) N.Y. Giants (7–9) Washington (3–13)
2014 (3) Dallas (12–4) Philadelphia (10–6) N.Y. Giants (6–10) Washington (4–12)
2015 (4) Washington (9–7) Philadelphia (7–9) N.Y. Giants (6–10) Dallas (4–12)
2016 (1) Dallas (13–3)(5) N.Y. Giants (11–5) Washington (8–7–1) Philadelphia (7–9)
2017 (1) Philadelphia (13–3) Dallas (9–7) Washington (7–9) N.Y. Giants (3–13)
2018 (4) Dallas (10–6)(6) Philadelphia (9–7) Washington (7–9) N.Y. Giants (5–11)
2019 (4) Philadelphia (9–7) Dallas (8–8) N.Y. Giants (4–12) Washington (3–13)
  • 2020: The Washington Redskins temporarily became the Washington Football Team.
2020 (4) Washington (7–9) N.Y. Giants (6–10) Dallas (6–10) Philadelphia (4–11–1)
2021 (3) Dallas (12–5)(7) Philadelphia (9–8) Washington (7–10) N.Y. Giants (4–13)
2022 (1) Philadelphia (14–3)(5) Dallas (12–5)(6) N.Y. Giants (9–7–1) Washington (8–8–1)
2023 (2) Dallas (12–5)(5) Philadelphia (11–6) N.Y. Giants (6–11) Washington (4–13)

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Dallas Cowboys</span> National Football League franchise in Arlington, Texas

The Dallas Cowboys are a professional American football team based in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex. The Cowboys compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. The team is headquartered in Frisco, Texas, and has played its home games at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas, since its opening in 2009. The stadium took its current name prior to the 2013 season, following the team's decision to sell the stadium's naming rights to telecommunications company AT&T. In January 2020, Mike McCarthy was hired as head coach of the Cowboys. He is the ninth in the team's history. McCarthy follows Jason Garrett, who coached the team from 2010 to 2019.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">New York Giants</span> National Football League franchise in East Rutherford, New Jersey

The New York Giants are a professional American football team based in the New York metropolitan area. The Giants compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. The team plays its home games at MetLife Stadium at the Meadowlands Sports Complex in East Rutherford, New Jersey, 5 miles (8 km) west of New York City. The stadium is shared with the New York Jets. The Giants are headquartered and practice at the Quest Diagnostics Training Center, also in the Meadowlands.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Philadelphia Eagles</span> National Football League franchise in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

The Philadelphia Eagles are a professional American football team based in Philadelphia. The Eagles compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. The team plays its home games at Lincoln Financial Field in the South Philadelphia Sports Complex.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">San Francisco 49ers</span> National Football League franchise in Santa Clara, California

The San Francisco 49ers are a professional American football team based in the San Francisco Bay Area. The 49ers compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) West division, and play their home games at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, California, located 38 miles (61 km) southeast of San Francisco. The team is named after the prospectors who arrived in Northern California in the 1849 Gold Rush.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">National Football Conference</span> One of two conferences in the National Football League

The National Football Conference (NFC) is one of the two conferences of the National Football League (NFL), the highest level of professional American football in the United States. The NFC and its counterpart, the American Football Conference (AFC), each have 16 teams organized into four divisions.

Below is a list of professional football Championship Games in the United States, involving:

<span class="mw-page-title-main">NFC Championship Game</span> Semifinal championship football game in the NFL

The NFC Championship Game is the annual championship game of the National Football Conference (NFC) and one of the two semifinal playoff games of the National Football League (NFL), the largest professional American football league in the world. The game is played on the last Sunday in January by the two remaining playoff teams, following the NFC postseason's first two rounds. The NFC champion then advances to face the winner of the AFC Championship Game in the Super Bowl.

The National Football Conference – Western Division or NFC West is one of the four divisions of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). It currently has four members: the Arizona Cardinals, the Los Angeles Rams, the San Francisco 49ers, and the Seattle Seahawks.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1979 NFL season</span> 1979 National Football League season

The 1979 NFL season was the 60th regular season of the National Football League. The season ended with Super Bowl XIV when the Pittsburgh Steelers repeated as champions by defeating the Los Angeles Rams 31–19 at the Rose Bowl. The Steelers became the first team to win back-to-back Super Bowls twice.

The 1970 NFL season was the 51st regular season of the National Football League, and the first after the consummation of the AFL–NFL merger. The merged league realigned into two conferences: all ten of the American Football League (AFL) teams joined the Baltimore Colts, Cleveland Browns, and Pittsburgh Steelers to form the American Football Conference (AFC); the other thirteen NFL clubs formed the National Football Conference (NFC).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1969 NFL season</span> 1969 National Football League season

The 1969 NFL season was the 50th regular season of the National Football League, and its last before the AFL–NFL merger. To honor the NFL's fiftieth season, a special anniversary logo was designed and each player wore a patch on their jerseys with this logo throughout the season.

The 1960 NFL season was the 41st regular season of the National Football League.

NFL's Greatest Games is a series of television programs that air on NFL Network, ESPN and related networks. They are condensed versions of some of the most famous games in the history of the National Football League, using footage and sound captured by NFL Films, as well as original interviews. All installments produced before 2015 are 90 minutes in length, and are presented with a title in respect to the game being featured. Starting in 2015, new installments produced run for either 30 minutes, 60 minutes, or 90 minutes, and no longer have a title beyond the actual game itself that is featured.

This article contains an in-depth explanation of the history of the Dallas Cowboys, a professional American football team that competes in the National Football League (NFL).

The 1995 Dallas Cowboys season was the franchise's 36th season in the National Football League (NFL) and was the second year under head coach Barry Switzer and final of the three Super Bowl titles they would win during 1992 to 1995. Dallas would be the first team to ever win three Super Bowls in a span of four seasons. Switzer guided the Cowboys to a fifth Super Bowl win by defeating the Pittsburgh Steelers 27–17 in Super Bowl XXX.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Eagles–Giants rivalry</span> National Football League rivalry

The Eagles–Giants rivalry is a National Football League (NFL) rivalry between the Philadelphia Eagles and New York Giants. The rivalry began in 1933 with the founding of the Eagles, and slowly strengthened when both teams came to relative prominence in the 1940s and 1950s. The two teams have played in the same division in the NFL every year since 1933, making it the second-oldest rivalry in the NFC East division, behind only New York's rivalry with the Washington Commanders. The ferocity of the rivalry can also be attributed to the geographic New York-Philadelphia rivalry, which is mirrored in Major League Baseball's Mets–Phillies rivalry and the National Hockey League's Flyers–Rangers rivalry. It is ranked by NFL Network as the number one rivalry of all-time and Sports Illustrated ranks it amongst the top ten NFL rivalries of all-time at number four, and according to ESPN, it is one of the fiercest and most well-known rivalries in the football community.

As with all sports leagues, there are several significant rivalries between teams and notable players in the National Football League (NFL). Rivalries are occasionally created due to a particular event that causes bad blood between teams, players, coaches, or owners, but for the most part, they arise simply due to the frequency with which some teams play each other and sometimes exist for geographic reasons.

The Cowboys–Steelers rivalry is a rivalry in the NFL. The Cowboys currently lead the all-time series 17–16. The two teams met in the Super Bowl three times, the most of any two teams. CBS Sports ranked this rivalry No. 2 of the best NFL rivalries of the 1970s. As the Cowboys are in the NFC and the Steelers are in the AFC, they usually only meet at least once every four years and at least once every eight seasons at each team's home stadium, sometimes more often if the two teams finish in the same place in their respective divisions in the year they do not play one another but met two years prior, play in the preseason, or meet in the Super Bowl.

References

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  2. Hladik, Matt (January 7, 2024). "The NFC East's New Division Winner Streak Has Now Reached 19 Years". AthlonSports.com | Expert Predictions, Picks, and Previews. Retrieved February 14, 2024.
  3. Richman, Jacob (January 9, 2024). "When was the last NFC East repeat champion and why is the streak so long?". lonestarlive. Retrieved February 14, 2024.
  4. Frank, Reuben (August 28, 2023). "A look at every NFC East winner since 2004 and why they didn't repeat". NBC Sports Philadelphia. Retrieved February 14, 2024.
  5. "Analysis: NFC East goes from least to beast in 2 years". USA TODAY. Retrieved February 14, 2024.
  6. Gordon, Grant (January 7, 2024). "Cowboys win second NFC East title in three seasons with win over Commanders". NFL.com. Retrieved February 14, 2024.
  7. https://web.archive.org/web/20120407154627/http://www.tvb.org/media/file/TVB_Market_Profiles_Nielsen_Household_DMA_RANKS.pdf. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 7, 2012. Retrieved July 20, 2012.{{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  8. "Lincoln Financial Field - Google Maps". Google Maps. Retrieved November 30, 2016.
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  10. "FedExField". Redskins. Retrieved December 12, 2016.
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  12. "NFL team valuations rankings for 2023:Cowboys again tower over every franchise, Giants exceed $7 billion". CBS Sports. August 9, 2023. Retrieved September 11, 2023.
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  14. 1 2 3 "Graphic: Which NFL Playoff Seeds Succeed?". January 3, 2013.