NFC East

Last updated

NFC East
Conference National Football Conference
League National Football League
Sport American football
Founded1967 (as the NFL Eastern Conference Capitol Division)
Country United States
Teams
No. of teams4
Championships
Most recent champion(s) Washington Football Team
(10th title)
Most titles Dallas Cowboys
(23 titles)

The National Football Conference – Eastern Division or NFC East is one of the four divisions of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). It currently has four members: the Dallas Cowboys (based in Frisco, Texas), New York Giants (based in East Rutherford, New Jersey), Philadelphia Eagles (based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), and the Washington Football Team (based in Ashburn, Virginia).

Contents

The division was formed in 1967 as the National Football League Capitol Division, keeping with the theme of having all of the league's divisions starting with the letter "C."[ citation needed ] The division was so named because it was centered on the capital of the United States, Washington, D.C., and the country's birthplace, Philadelphia. In 1967 and 1969 the teams in the NFL Capitol Division were Dallas, Philadelphia, Washington and the expansion team New Orleans Saints, which had been replaced by the New York Giants for the 1968 season. The NFC East is currently the only division in the league in which all four current teams have won at least one Super Bowl, and have appeared in multiple Super Bowls.

History

The NFC East has a long history of being geographically inaccurate. While the New York Giants, Philadelphia, and Washington are based on the East Coast, Dallas and St. Louis (later Phoenix, then Arizona) remained a part of the East from the 1970 merger until 2002 despite being geographically west of most teams in the conference.

To begin with, the Cowboys were only located east of two NFC teams that were outside of the East division (Los Angeles Rams and San Francisco 49ers from the West division) while the Cardinals were east of one additional such team (Minnesota Vikings from the Central division). The Tampa Bay Buccaneers joined the Central as an expansion team in 1976; they're located east of Dallas and St. Louis. The Cardinals relocated to Phoenix to start the 1988 season and stayed in the East through 2001; that made them located west of every team in the NFC except for the Rams and 49ers. The Rams relocated from Los Angeles to St. Louis to start the 1995 season and stayed in the West, while the Carolina Panthers joined the West as an expansion team that same season; this made the Cardinals and Cowboys west of every team in the conference except for the 49ers from 1995 to 2001.

General information

The NFC East teams have combined to be the most successful division in the NFL since the 1970 NFL merger with 21 NFC championships and 13 Super Bowl victories, the highest marks of any division in the NFL. The division features a number of prominent rivalries such as the Cowboys–Eagles rivalry, Cowboys–Washington rivalry and Eagles–Giants rivalry, among others. Because the division's teams are in some of the United States' largest media markets (New York No. 1, Philadelphia No. 4, Dallas-Fort Worth No. 5, and Washington No. 9), the NFC East receives a high amount of coverage from national sports media outlets. [1] In the early 1990s the division claimed four consecutive Super Bowl champions, all against the Buffalo Bills, with the Giants and Washington respectively winning back-to-back in Super Bowls XXV and XXVI; and the Cowboys winning twice after in Super Bowls XXVII and XXVIII. Those same three teams won seven out of ten Super Bowls, from 1986–87 to 1995–96 (the 49ers won the other three during that span). The Eagles are the most recent team in the division to win a Super Bowl, beating the Patriots 41–33 in Super Bowl LII. The NFC East was the first division since the 2002 realignment to send 3 teams to the playoffs when the 2006-07 NFL playoffs had Philadelphia winning the division and Dallas and New York taking both Wild Card spots.

The Philadelphia Eagles are the only NFC East team to actually play in the city of the team's naming, Philadelphia. [2] The other three teams play in suburbs of the major cities they are named after. The Dallas Cowboys play in Arlington, Texas, and is the only team in this division that is not based in the Eastern Time Zone (the Cowboys are based in the Central Time Zone). [3] The Washington Football Team plays in Landover, Maryland [4] and the New York Giants play in East Rutherford, New Jersey, [5] where they share a stadium with the New York Jets. Analogously, three of the four AFC East teams do not actually play within the city of their naming. (The Patriots geographical identifier is New England, being named for the region the team plays in.)

The NFC East can also be called the most valuable NFL division. All four teams in the division are in the top ten of most valuable NFL franchises (Cowboys #1; Giants #3; Washington #7; Eagles #10). [6] The next closest division is the AFC North, which is not completed until the 26th ranked Cincinnati Bengals. [7]

Division lineups

Place cursor over year for division champion.

NFL Eastern Conference
Capitol Division
NFC East Division [B]
1900s2000s
67 [A] 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 [C] 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01
Dallas Cowboys
Philadelphia Eagles
Washington Redskins
N.O. SaintsNY Giants N.O. SaintsNew York Giants
  St. Louis Cardinals [C] Phoenix CardinalsArizona Cardinals [D]
NFC East Division [E]
2000s
02 03 04 05 06 07 [F] 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
Dallas Cowboys
Philadelphia Eagles
Washington RedskinsWashington Football Team
New York Giants
 Team not in division Division Won Super Bowl Division Won NFC Championship
A The Eastern Conference was divided into the Capitol and Century Divisions. Dallas, Philadelphia, and Washington moved in. Also, the New Orleans Saints joined the league.
B The Capitol Division adopts its current name. New Orleans realigned to the NFC West. The Giants and Cardinals are added from the Century Division.
C Although the Cardinals were division champions, the Cowboys won the NFC Championship as a wild card qualifier.
D St. Louis moved to Phoenix in 1988. The team changed its name from Phoenix Cardinals to the Arizona Cardinals in 1994.
E Arizona moved to the NFC West when the league realigned into eight four-team divisions before the 2002 season.
F Although the Cowboys were division champions, the Giants won the Super Bowl as a wild card qualifier.

Division champions

As NFL Capitol Division

SeasonTeamRecordPlayoff Results
NFL Capitol
1967 Dallas Cowboys 9–5Won Conference playoffs (Browns) 52–14
Lost NFL Championship Game (at Packers) 17–21
1968 Dallas Cowboys 12–2Lost Conference playoffs (at Browns) 20–31
1969 Dallas Cowboys 11–2–1Lost Conference playoffs (Browns) 14–38

There was one division sweep of the Capitol Division: the 1969 Cowboys went 6–0 in division matchups. [8]

As NFC East

There have been no repeat division winners since 2004, 16 years. This is the longest active streak among divisions in the NFL as well as the longest in league history.

SeasonTeamRecordPlayoff Results
1970 Dallas Cowboys 10–4Won Divisional playoffs (Lions) 5–0
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 17–10
Lost Super Bowl V (vs. Colts) 13–16
1971 Dallas Cowboys 11–3Won Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 20–12
Won NFC Championship (49ers) 14–3
Won Super Bowl VI (vs. Dolphins) 24–3
1972 Washington Redskins 11–3Won Divisional playoffs (Packers) 16–3
Won NFC Championship (Cowboys) 26–3
Lost Super Bowl VII (vs. Dolphins) 7–14
1973 Dallas Cowboys 10–4Won Divisional playoffs (Rams) 27–16
Lost NFC Championship (Vikings) 10–27
1974 St. Louis Cardinals 10–4Lost Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 14–30
1975 St. Louis Cardinals 11–3Lost Divisional playoffs (at Rams) 23–35
1976 Dallas Cowboys 11–3Lost Divisional playoffs (Rams) 12–14
1977 Dallas Cowboys 12–2Won Divisional playoffs (Bears) 37–7
Won NFC Championship (Vikings) 23–6
Won Super Bowl XII (vs. Broncos) 27–10
1978 Dallas Cowboys 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Falcons) 27–20
Won NFC Championship (at Rams) 28–0
Lost Super Bowl XIII (vs. Steelers) 31–35
1979 Dallas Cowboys 11–5Lost Divisional playoffs (Rams) 19–21
1980 Philadelphia Eagles 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Vikings) 31–16
Won NFC Championship (Cowboys) 20–7
Lost Super Bowl XV (vs. Raiders) 10–27
1981 Dallas Cowboys 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Buccaneers) 38–0
Lost NFC Championship (at 49ers) 27–28
1982 Washington Redskins 8–1Won First Round playoffs (Lions) 31–7
Won Second Round playoffs (Vikings) 21–7
Won NFC Championship (Cowboys) 31–17
Won Super Bowl XVII (vs. Dolphins) 27–17
1983 Washington Redskins 14–2Won Divisional playoffs (Rams) 51–7
Won NFC Championship (49ers) 24–21
Lost Super Bowl XVIII (vs. Raiders) 9–38
1984 Washington Redskins 11–5Lost Divisional playoffs (Bears) 19–23
1985 Dallas Cowboys 10–6Lost Divisional playoffs (at Rams) 0–20
1986 New York Giants 14–2Won Divisional playoffs (49ers) 49–3
Won NFC Championship (Redskins) 17–0
Won Super Bowl XXI (vs. Broncos) 39–20
1987 Washington Redskins 11–4Won Divisional playoffs (at Bears) 21–17
Won NFC Championship (Vikings) 17–10
Won Super Bowl XXII (vs. Broncos) 42–10
1988 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6Lost Divisional playoffs (at Bears) 12–20
1989 New York Giants 12–4Lost Divisional playoffs (Rams) 13–19 (OT)
1990 New York Giants 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Bears) 31–3
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 15–13
Won Super Bowl XXV (vs. Bills) 20–19
1991 Washington Redskins 14–2Won Divisional playoffs (Falcons) 24–7
Won NFC Championship (Lions) 41–10
Won Super Bowl XXVI (vs. Bills) 37–24
1992 Dallas Cowboys 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Eagles) 34–10
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 30–20
Won Super Bowl XXVII (vs. Bills) 52–17
1993 Dallas Cowboys 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Packers) 27–17
Won NFC Championship (49ers) 38–21
Won Super Bowl XXVIII (vs. Bills) 30–13
1994 Dallas Cowboys 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Packers) 35–9
Lost NFC Championship (at 49ers) 28–38
1995 Dallas Cowboys 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Eagles) 30–11
Won NFC Championship (Packers) 38–27
Won Super Bowl XXX (5) (vs. Steelers) 27–17
1996 Dallas Cowboys 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Vikings) 40–15
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Panthers) 17–26
1997 New York Giants 10–5–1Lost Wild Card playoffs (Vikings) 22–23
1998 Dallas Cowboys 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (Cardinals) 7–20
1999 Washington Redskins 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Lions) 27–13
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Buccaneers) 13–14
2000 New York Giants 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Eagles) 20–10
Won NFC Championship (Vikings) 41–0
Lost Super Bowl XXXV (vs. Ravens) 7–34
2001 Philadelphia Eagles 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (Buccaneers) 31–9
Won Divisional playoffs (at Bears) 33–19
Lost NFC Championship (at Rams) 24–29
NFC East
2002 Philadelphia Eagles 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Falcons) 20–6
Lost NFC Championship (Buccaneers) 10–27
2003 Philadelphia Eagles 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Packers) 20–17 (OT)
Lost NFC Championship (Panthers) 3–14
2004 Philadelphia Eagles 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Vikings) 27–14
Won NFC Championship (Falcons) 27–10
Lost Super Bowl XXXIX (vs. Patriots) 21–24
2005 New York Giants 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (Panthers) 0–23
2006 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Giants) 23–20
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Saints) 24–27
2007 Dallas Cowboys 13–3Lost Divisional playoffs (Giants) 17–21
2008 New York Giants 12–4Lost Divisional playoffs (Eagles) 11–23
2009 Dallas Cowboys 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (Eagles) 34–14
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 3–34
2010 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (Packers) 16–21
2011 New York Giants 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (Falcons) 24–2
Won Divisional playoffs (at Packers) 37–20
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 20–17 (OT)
Won Super Bowl XLVI (vs. Patriots) 21–17
2012 Washington Redskins 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (Seahawks) 14–24
2013 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (Saints) 24–26
2014 Dallas Cowboys 12–4Won Wild Card playoffs (Lions) 24–20
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Packers) 21–26
2015 Washington Redskins 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (Packers) 18–35
2016 Dallas Cowboys 13–3Lost Divisional playoffs (Packers) 31–34
2017 Philadelphia Eagles 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Falcons) 15–10
Won NFC Championship (Vikings) 38–7
Won Super Bowl LII (vs. Patriots) 41–33
2018 Dallas Cowboys 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Seahawks) 24–22
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Rams) 22–30
2019 Philadelphia Eagles 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (Seahawks) 9–17
2020 Washington Football Team 7–9Lost Wild Card playoffs (Buccaneers) 23–31

All four teams in the NFC East have won the Super Bowl. The Cowboys lead with five, followed by the Giants with four, Washington with three, and the Eagles with one. In overall NFL history, however, the Giants lead with eight league championships, followed by the Cowboys and Washington with five each, then the Eagles with four.

There have been two division sweeps of the NFC East Division, the 1998 Dallas Cowboys (8–0) and the 2004 Philadelphia Eagles (6–0). [8] However, only the 2004 Eagles remained undefeated against divisional opponents for the full duration of the season after Dallas lost to Arizona in the 1998 NFC Wild Card playoffs.

Wild Card qualifiers

SeasonTeamRecordPlayoff Results
NFC East
1971 Washington Redskins 9–4–1Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 20–24
1972 Dallas Cowboys 10–4Won Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 30–28
Lost NFC Championship (at Redskins) 3–26
1973 Washington Redskins 10–4Lost Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 20–27
1974 Washington Redskins 10–4Lost Divisional playoffs (at Rams) 10–19
1975 Dallas Cowboys 10–4Won Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 17–14
Won NFC Championship (at Rams) 37–7
Lost Super Bowl X (vs. Steelers) 17–21
1976 Washington Redskins 10–4Lost Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 20–35
1978 Philadelphia Eagles 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Falcons) 13–14
1979 Philadelphia Eagles 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (Bears) 27–17
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Buccaneers) 17–24
1980 Dallas Cowboys 12–4Won Wild Card playoffs (Rams) 34–13
Won Divisional playoffs (at Falcons) 30–27
Lost NFC Championship (at Eagles) 7–20
1981 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (Giants) 21–27
New York Giants 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (at Eagles) 27–21
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 24–38
1982+ Dallas Cowboys 6–3Won First Round playoffs (Buccaneers) 30–17
Won Second Round playoffs (Packers) 37–26
Lost NFC Championship (at Redskins) 17–31
St. Louis Cardinals 5–4Lost First Round playoffs (at Packers) 16–41
1983 Dallas Cowboys 12–4Lost Wild Card playoffs (Rams) 17–24
1984 New York Giants 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (at Rams) 16–13
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 10–21
1985 New York Giants 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (49ers) 17–3
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Bears) 0–21
1986 Washington Redskins 12–4Won Wild Card playoffs (Rams) 19–7
Won Divisional playoffs (at Bears) 27–13
Lost NFC Championship (at Giants) 0–17
1989 Philadelphia Eagles 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (Rams) 7–21
1990 Washington Redskins 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (at Eagles) 20–6
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 10–28
Philadelphia Eagles 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (Redskins) 6–20
1991 Dallas Cowboys 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (at Bears) 17–13
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Lions) 6–38
1992 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (at Saints) 36–20
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Cowboys) 10–34
Washington Redskins 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (at Vikings) 24–7
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 13–20
1993 New York Giants 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (Vikings) 17–10
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 3–44
1995 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Lions) 58–37
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Cowboys) 11–30
1996 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at 49ers) 0–14
1998 Arizona Cardinals 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (at Cowboys) 20–7
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 21–41
1999 Dallas Cowboys 8–8Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Vikings) 10–27
2000 Philadelphia Eagles 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (Buccaneers) 21–3
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Giants) 10–20
NFC East
2002 New York Giants 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at 49ers) 38–39
2003 Dallas Cowboys 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Panthers) 10–29
2005 Washington Redskins 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (at Buccaneers) 17–10
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Seahawks) 10–20
2006 Dallas Cowboys 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Seahawks) 20–21
New York Giants 8–8Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Eagles) 20–23
2007 New York Giants 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (at Buccaneers) 24–14
Won Divisional playoffs (at Cowboys) 21–17
Won NFC Championship (at Packers) 23–20 (OT)
Won Super Bowl XLII (vs. Patriots) 17–14
Washington Redskins 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Seahawks) 14–35
2008 Philadelphia Eagles 9–6–1Won Wild Card playoffs (at Vikings) 26–14
Won Divisional playoffs (at Giants) 23–11
Lost NFC Championship (at Cardinals) 25–32
2009 Philadelphia Eagles 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Cowboys) 14–34
2016 New York Giants 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Packers) 13–38
2018 Philadelphia Eagles 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (at Bears) 16–15
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Saints) 14–20

Total playoff berths since 1967

TeamDivision
Championships
Playoff
Berths
Super Bowl
Appearances
Super Bowl
Championships
Dallas Cowboys 233285
Philadelphia Eagles 112331
Washington Football Team 111953
New York Giants 81654
Arizona Cardinals 12400

To sort table above, click button to right of heading.

NFC EastDivision
Championships
Playoff
Berths
NFC
Championships
Super Bowl
Championships
Totals- 1967-201953932113
1These numbers only reflect the Cardinals' time as a member of the NFC East, as the team realigned to the NFC West after the 2001 season.

Season results

(#)Denotes team that won the Super Bowl
(#)Denotes team that won the NFC Championship
(#)Denotes team that qualified for the NFL Playoffs
SeasonTeam (record)
1st2nd3rd4th5th
NFL Capitol
1967 Dallas (9–5) Philadelphia (6–7–1) Washington (5–6–3) New Orleans (3–11)
1968 Dallas (12–2) N.Y. Giants (7–7) Washington (5–9) Philadelphia (2–12)
1969 Dallas (11–2–1) Washington (7–5–2) New Orleans (5–9) Philadelphia (4–9–1)
NFC East
1970 Dallas (10–4) N.Y. Giants (9–5) St. Louis (8–5–1) Washington (6–8) Philadelphia (3–10–1)
1971 Dallas (11–3) Washington (9–4–1) Philadelphia (6–7–1) St. Louis (4–9–1) N.Y. Giants (4–10)
1972 Washington (11–3) Dallas (10–4) N.Y. Giants (8–6) St. Louis (4–9–1) Philadelphia (2–11–1)
1973 Dallas (10–4) Washington (10–4) Philadelphia (5–8–1) St. Louis (4–9–1) N.Y. Giants (2–11–1)
1974 St. Louis (10–4) Washington (10–4) Dallas (8–6) Philadelphia (7–7) N.Y. Giants (2–12)
1975 (3) St. Louis (11–3)(4) Dallas (10–4) Washington (8–6) N.Y. Giants (5–9) Philadelphia (4–10)
1976 (2) Dallas (11–3)(4) Washington (10–4) St. Louis (10–4) Philadelphia (4–10) N.Y. Giants (3–11)
1977 (1) Dallas (12–2) Washington (9–5) St. Louis (7–7) Philadelphia (5–9) N.Y. Giants (5–9)
1978 (2) Dallas (12–4)(5) Philadelphia (9–7) Washington (8–8) St. Louis (6–10) N.Y. Giants (6–10)
1979 (1) Dallas (11–5)(4) Philadelphia (11–5) Washington (10–6) N.Y. Giants (6–10) St. Louis (5–11)
1980 (2) Philadelphia (12–4)(4) Dallas (12–4) Washington (6–10) St. Louis (5–11) N.Y. Giants (4–12)
1981 (2) Dallas (12–4)(4) Philadelphia (10–6)(5) N.Y. Giants (9–7) Washington (8–8) St. Louis (7–9)
1982^(1) Washington (8–1)(2) Dallas (6–3)(6) St. Louis (5–4) N.Y. Giants (4–5) Philadelphia (3–6)
1983 (1) Washington (14–2)(4) Dallas (12–4) St. Louis (8–7–1) Philadelphia (5–11) N.Y. Giants (3–12–1)
1984 (2) Washington (11–5)(5) N.Y. Giants (9–7) St. Louis (9–7) Dallas (9–7) Philadelphia (6–9–1)
1985 (3) Dallas (10–6)(4) N.Y. Giants (10–6) Washington (10–6) Philadelphia (7–9) St. Louis (5–11)
1986 (1) N.Y. Giants (14–2)(4) Washington (12–4) Dallas (7–9) Philadelphia (5–10–1) St. Louis (4–11–1)
1987 (3) Washington (11–4) Dallas (7–8) St. Louis (7–8) Philadelphia (7–8) N.Y. Giants (6–9)
1988 (3) Philadelphia (10–6) N.Y. Giants (10–6) Washington (7–9) Phoenix (7–9) Dallas (3–13)
1989 (2) N.Y. Giants (12–4)(4) Philadelphia (11–5) Washington (10–6) Phoenix (5–11) Dallas (1–15)
1990 (2) N.Y. Giants (13–3)(4) Philadelphia (10–6)(5) Washington (10–6) Dallas (7–9) Phoenix (5–11)
1991 (1) Washington (14–2)(5) Dallas (11–5) Philadelphia (10–6) N.Y. Giants (8–8) Phoenix (4–12)
1992 (2) Dallas (13–3)(5) Philadelphia (11–5)(6) Washington (9–7) N.Y. Giants (6–10) Phoenix (4–12)
1993 (1) Dallas (12–4)(4) N.Y. Giants (11–5) Philadelphia (8–8) Phoenix (7–9) Washington (4–12)
1994 (2) Dallas (12–4) N.Y. Giants (9–7) Arizona (8–8) Philadelphia (7–9) Washington (3–13)
1995 (1) Dallas (12–4)(4) Philadelphia (10–6) Washington (6–10) N.Y. Giants (5–11) Arizona (4–12)
1996 (3) Dallas (10–6)(5) Philadelphia (10–6) Washington (9–7) Arizona (7–9) N.Y. Giants (6–10)
1997 (3) N.Y. Giants (10–5–1) Washington (8–7–1) Philadelphia (6–9–1) Dallas (6–10) Arizona (4–12)
1998 (3) Dallas (10–6)(6) Arizona (9–7) N.Y. Giants (8–8) Washington (6–10) Philadelphia (3–13)
1999 (3) Washington (10–6)(5) Dallas (8–8) N.Y. Giants (7–9) Arizona (6–10) Philadelphia (5–11)
2000 (1) N.Y. Giants (12–4)(4) Philadelphia (11–5) Washington (8–8) Dallas (5–11) Arizona (3–13)
2001 (3) Philadelphia (11–5) Washington (8–8) N.Y. Giants (7–9) Arizona (7–9) Dallas (5–11)
2002 (1) Philadelphia (12–4)(5) N.Y. Giants (10–6) Washington (7–9) Dallas (5–11)
2003 (1) Philadelphia (12–4)(6) Dallas (10–6) Washington (5–11) N.Y. Giants (4–12)
2004 (1) Philadelphia (13–3) N.Y. Giants (6–10) Dallas (6–10) Washington (6–10)
2005 (4) N.Y. Giants (11–5)(6) Washington (10–6) Dallas (9–7) Philadelphia (6–10)
2006 (3) Philadelphia (10–6)(5) Dallas (9–7)(6) N.Y. Giants (8–8) Washington (5–11)
2007 (1) Dallas (13–3)(5) N.Y. Giants (10–6)(6) Washington (9–7) Philadelphia (8–8)
2008 (1) N.Y. Giants (12–4)(6) Philadelphia (9–6–1) Dallas (9–7) Washington (8–8)
2009 (3) Dallas (11–5)(6) Philadelphia (11–5) N.Y. Giants (8–8) Washington (4–12)
2010 (3) Philadelphia (10–6) N.Y. Giants (10–6) Dallas (6–10) Washington (6–10)
2011 (4) N.Y. Giants (9–7) Philadelphia (8–8) Dallas (8–8) Washington (5–11)
2012 (4) Washington (10–6) N.Y. Giants (9–7) Dallas (8–8) Philadelphia (4–12)
2013 (3) Philadelphia (10–6) Dallas (8–8) N.Y. Giants (7–9) Washington (3–13)
2014 (3) Dallas (12–4) Philadelphia (10–6) N.Y. Giants (6–10) Washington (4–12)
2015 (4) Washington (9–7) Philadelphia (7–9) N.Y. Giants (6–10) Dallas (4–12)
2016 (1) Dallas (13–3)(5) N.Y. Giants (11–5) Washington (8–7–1) Philadelphia (7–9)
2017 (1) Philadelphia (13–3) Dallas (9–7) Washington (7–9) N.Y. Giants (3–13)
2018 (4) Dallas (10–6)(6) Philadelphia (9–7) Washington (7–9) N.Y. Giants (5–11)
2019 (4) Philadelphia (9–7) Dallas (8–8) N.Y. Giants (4–12) Washington (3–13)
2020 (4) Washington (7–9) N.Y. Giants (6–10) Dallas (6–10) Philadelphia (4–11–1)

See also

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1979 NFL season US football sports season

The 1979 NFL season was the 60th regular season of the National Football League. The season ended with Super Bowl XIV when the Pittsburgh Steelers repeated as champions by defeating the Los Angeles Rams 31–19 at the Rose Bowl. The Steelers became the first team to win back-to-back Super Bowls twice. It was also the 20th anniversary of the American Football League.

The 1970 NFL season was the 51st regular season of the National Football League, and the first one after the AFL–NFL merger. The season concluded with Super Bowl V when the Baltimore Colts beat the Dallas Cowboys 16–13 at the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida. The Pro Bowl took place on January 24, 1971, where the NFC beat the AFC 27–6 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.

NFL's Greatest Games is a series of television programs that air on NFL Network, ESPN and related networks. They are condensed versions of some of the most famous games in the history of the National Football League, using footage and sound captured by NFL Films, as well as original interviews. All installments produced before 2015 are 90 minutes in length, and are presented with a title in respect to the game being featured. Starting in 2015, new installments produced run for either 30 minutes, 60 minutes, or 90 minutes, and no longer have a title beyond the actual game itself that is featured.

This article contains an in-depth explanation of the history of the Dallas Cowboys, a professional American football team that competes in the National Football League (NFL).

The 1995 Dallas Cowboys season was the franchise's 36th season in the National Football League and was the second year under head coach Barry Switzer and final of the three Super Bowl titles they would win during 1992 to 1995. Dallas would be the first team to ever win three Super Bowls in a span of four seasons. Switzer guided the Cowboys to a fifth Super Bowl win by defeating the Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl XXX. As of 2020, this is the last time the Cowboys appeared in the NFC Championship Game, and in turn, their last Super Bowl appearance.

Eagles–Giants rivalry National Football League rivalry

The Eagles–Giants rivalry is a National Football League (NFL) rivalry between the Philadelphia Eagles and New York Giants. The rivalry began in 1933 with the founding of the Eagles, and slowly strengthened when both teams came to relative prominence in the 1940s and 1950s. The two teams have played in the same division in the NFL every year since 1933, making it the second-oldest rivalry in the NFC East division, behind only New York's rivalry with the Washington Football Team. The ferocity of the rivalry can also be attributed to the geographic New York-Philadelphia rivalry, which is mirrored in Major League Baseball's Mets–Phillies rivalry and the National Hockey League's Flyers–Rangers rivalry. It is ranked by NFL Network as the number one rivalry of all-time and Sports Illustrated ranks it amongst the top ten NFL rivalries of all-time at number four, and according to ESPN, it is one of the fiercest and most well-known rivalries in the football community.

As with all sports leagues, there are a number of significant rivalries in the National Football League (NFL). Rivalries are occasionally created due to a particular event that causes bad blood between teams, players, coaches, or owners, but for the most part, they arise simply due to the frequency with which some teams play each other, and sometimes exist for geographic reasons.

This is a list of playoff records set by various teams in various categories in the National Football League during the Super Bowl Era.

The Cowboys–Steelers rivalry is a rivalry in the NFL. The Cowboys currently lead the all-time series 17–16. The two teams met in the Super Bowl three times. They play in different conferences, they only meet once every four regular seasons and occasionally in the preseason.

Cowboys–Giants rivalry National Football League rivalry

The Cowboys–Giants rivalry is a National Football League (NFL) rivalry between the Dallas Cowboys and New York Giants. The beginning of this rivalry is difficult to trace, but is perhaps best defined by the first game the two teams ever played back in 1960, which resulted in a 31–31 tie. In the early 1960s the New York Giants were beginning to wind down as an NFL powerhouse. After having been arguably the most dominant team in the Eastern Conference through the 1950s and early 1960s the Giants entered a period of poor play where they did not make the playoffs from 1964–80. While the Giants dominated the Cowboys in the first few years of the rivalry, the Cowboys picked up steam and took control from the mid-1960s to the early 1980s, winning 17 of the 20 meetings between the 2 teams in the 1970s. In the 1980s however the Giants struck back, and the rivalry has been relatively even handed ever since with intermittent spurts of dominance. This is a unique rivalry in American sports in that no other Texas area team is in the same division as a New York area team, or has a consistent rivalry with one, most likely due to the relatively far geographical distance between the two regions.

References

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