NFC West

Last updated

NFC West
Conference National Football Conference
League National Football League
Sport American football
Founded1967 (as the NFL Western Conference Coastal Division)
CountryUnited States
Teams
No. of teams4
Championships
Most recent champion(s) Seattle Seahawks (9th title)
Most titles San Francisco 49ers (20 titles)

The National Football Conference Western Division or NFC West is one of the four divisions of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). It currently has four members: the Arizona Cardinals, the Los Angeles Rams, the San Francisco 49ers, and the Seattle Seahawks.

Contents

The division was formed in 1967 as the National Football League Coastal Division, keeping with the theme of having all of the league's divisions starting with the letter "C."[ citation needed ] The division was so named because its teams were fairly close to the coasts of the United States, although they were on opposite coasts, making for long travel between division rivals. The NFL Coastal Division had four members: Atlanta Falcons, Baltimore Colts, Los Angeles Rams, and San Francisco 49ers. Los Angeles and San Francisco occupied the West Coast, while Baltimore maintained its dominance over the lesser teams that remained in the division. Atlanta was placed in the division instead of the expansion New Orleans Saints despite being farther east than five Eastern Conference teams (Cowboys, Cardinals, Saints, Browns and Steelers).

After the AFL–NFL merger in 1970, the division was renamed the NFC West. The Baltimore Colts moved to the AFC East and were replaced by the Saints, who came from the Eastern Conference (the Saints played in the Capitol Division in 1967 and '69, and the Century Division in 1968). In 1976, the newly formed Seattle Seahawks spent one season in this division (Seattle did not play the other four members of the division home-and-home in 1976, playing each of the other 13 NFC teams and the other expansion team of 1976, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers) before moving to the AFC West. Except for that one year, the division remained the same until 1995 with the addition of the new Carolina Panthers team. The Rams moved to St. Louis before that same season, making the division geographically inaccurate. Ten of the fifteen NFC teams were based west of Atlanta, and twelve of them were based west of Charlotte (all except the Redskins, Eagles and Giants).

The 2002 re-alignment changed the entire look of the NFC West. The Falcons, Panthers, and Saints moved into the NFC South; while the Cardinals moved in from the NFC East and the Seahawks returned from the AFC West. The Rams remained in the West, preserving the historical rivalry with the 49ers that has existed since 1950, and thus had been the only team in the division that was located east of the Rocky Mountains until 2015; despite this, the re-alignment made the NFC West have all of its teams based west of the Mississippi River. With the Rams' return to Los Angeles in 2016, the entire NFC West is now located west of the Rockies for the first time in its history; all teams except for the Cardinals are based in the Pacific Time Zone (since most of Arizona does not observe daylight saving time, the clocks are the same as Pacific Daylight Time from the second Sunday in March until the first Sunday of November). The 2016 season marked the first time neither the 49ers nor Seahawks played a division game east of the Rocky Mountains.

The NFC West became the second division since the 2002 realignment (the NFC South was the first) to have each of its teams make a conference championship game appearance as well as a Super Bowl appearance: Los Angeles (2018), Arizona (2008 and 2015), San Francisco (2011, 2012, 2013, and 2019), and Seattle (2005, 2013, and 2014). Also since 2002, each team has won at least three division titles, one of only two divisions in the league to do so.

In 2010, the NFC West became the first division in NFL history to have a champion with a losing record, after the Seattle Seahawks won the division title with a record of 7–9. They were joined in this distinction in 2014 by the Carolina Panthers, who won the NFC South with a record of 7–8–1, and in 2020 by the Washington Football Team, who won the NFC East also with a record of 7–9.

The division is one of only two in which all of its teams have appeared in a Super Bowl at least once since the 2002 realignment (along with the NFC South): Arizona (2008), Los Angeles Rams (2018), San Francisco (2012, 2019), and Seattle (2005, 2013, 2014).

Since the end of the 2020 NFL regular season, the 49ers lead the division with a record of 589-499-16 (137-166-1 since re-alignment) with five Super Bowl titles and an overall playoff record of 33–22. The Rams hold a record of 586-575-21 (130-173-1 since re-alignment) with four Super Bowl appearances and one win to go with a 21–26 overall playoff record. The Cardinals hold a 135-167-2 record since joining the NFC West (566-770-41 overall) and a loss in Super Bowl XLIII, currently with a 7–9 playoff record, 5–4 as a member of the NFC West. The Seahawks hold a record of 179-124-1 since joining the NFC West (367–340–1 overall), with three Super Bowl appearances, winning Super Bowl XLVIII to go with a playoff record of 17–18; they are currently 14–13 in the playoffs as a member of the NFC West, having gone 3–5 while in the AFC West. Since re-alignment, the Seahawks have led the division in wins, division titles, and playoff appearances. In the 19 years since realignment (as of the end of the 2020 season) the Seahawks have as many playoff berths as the other 3 teams combined, and won the division only 1 fewer times (9) as the other 3 teams combined (10).

Division lineups

Place cursor over year for division champ or Super Bowl team.

NFL Western Conference
Coastal Division
NFC West Division [B]
1900s2000s
67 [A] 68 69 70 [B] 71 72 73 74 75 76 [C] 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 [D] 96 97 98 99 00 01
Atlanta Falcons
Los Angeles Rams St. Louis Rams
Baltimore Colts New Orleans Saints
San Francisco 49ers
  Seattle
Seahawks
  Carolina Panthers
NFC West Division [E]
2000s
02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 [F] 17 18 19 20 21
Arizona Cardinals
St. Louis RamsLos Angeles Rams
San Francisco 49ers
Seattle Seahawks
 Team not in division   Division Won Super Bowl   Division Won NFC Championship   Division Won NFL Championship, Lost Super Bowl III
A The Western Conference was divided into the Coastal and Central divisions. Atlanta moved in from the Eastern Conference. Also joining the Coastal Division were Baltimore, Los Angeles, and San Francisco.
B The Coastal Division adopts current name after the AFL–NFL merger. Baltimore moved to the AFC East. New Orleans moved in from Capitol Division.
C Seattle was enfranchised in 1976. Moved to the AFC West in 1977.
D In 1995, Carolina is enfranchised and the Rams move to St. Louis, Missouri.
E For the 2002 season, the league realigned to have eight four-team divisions. Seattle returns. Arizona joins from the East. Atlanta, Carolina, and New Orleans moved to the new NFC South.
F Prior to the 2016 season, the Rams moved back to Los Angeles.

Division champions

SeasonTeamRecordPlayoff Results
NFL Coastal
1967 Los Angeles Rams 11–1–2Lost Conference playoffs (at Packers) 7–28
1968 Baltimore Colts 13–1Won Conference playoffs (Vikings) 24–14
Won NFL Championship (Browns) 34–0
Lost Super Bowl III (Jets) 7–16
1969 Los Angeles Rams 11–3Lost Conference playoffs (at Vikings) 20–23
NFC West
1970 San Francisco 49ers [1] 10–3–1Won Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 17–14
Lost NFC Championship (Cowboys) 10–17
1971 San Francisco 49ers [2] 9–5Won Divisional playoffs (Redskins) 24–20
Lost NFC Championship (at Cowboys) 3–14
1972 San Francisco 49ers [3] 8–5–1Lost Divisional playoffs (Cowboys) 28–30
1973 Los Angeles Rams 12–2Lost Divisional playoffs (at Cowboys) 16–27
1974 Los Angeles Rams 10–4Won Divisional playoffs (Redskins) 19–10
Lost NFC Championship (at Vikings) 10–14
1975 Los Angeles Rams 12–2Won Divisional playoffs (Cardinals) 35–23
Lost NFC Championship (Cowboys) 7–37
1976 Los Angeles Rams 10–3–1Won Divisional playoffs (at Cowboys) 14–12
Lost NFC Championship (at Vikings) 13–24
1977 Los Angeles Rams 10–4Lost Divisional playoffs (Vikings) 7–14
1978 Los Angeles Rams 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Vikings) 34–10
Lost NFC Championship (Cowboys) 0–28
1979 Los Angeles Rams 9–7Won Divisional playoffs (at Cowboys) 21–19
Won NFC Championship (at Buccaneers) 9–0
Lost Super Bowl XIV (vs. Steelers) 19–31
1980 Atlanta Falcons 12–4Lost Divisional playoffs (Cowboys) 27–30
1981 San Francisco 49ers [4] 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Giants) 38–24
Won NFC Championship (Cowboys) 28–27
Won Super Bowl XVI (vs. Bengals) 26–21
1982* Atlanta Falcons 5–4Lost First Round playoffs (at Vikings) 24–30
1983 San Francisco 49ers [5] 10–6Won Divisional playoffs (Lions) 24–23
Lost NFC Championship (at Redskins) 21–24
1984 San Francisco 49ers [6] 15–1Won Divisional playoffs (Giants) 21–10
Won NFC Championship (Bears) 23–0
Won Super Bowl XIX (vs. Dolphins) 38–16
1985 Los Angeles Rams 11–5Won Divisional playoffs (Cowboys) 20–0
Lost NFC Championship (at Bears) 0–24
1986 San Francisco 49ers [7] 10–5–1Lost Divisional playoffs (at Giants) 3–49
1987 San Francisco 49ers [8] 13–2Lost Divisional playoffs (Vikings) 24–36
1988 San Francisco 49ers [9] 10–6Won Divisional playoffs (Vikings) 34–9
Won NFC Championship (at Bears) 28–3
Won Super Bowl XXIII (vs. Bengals) 20–16
1989 San Francisco 49ers [10] 14–2Won Divisional playoffs (Vikings) 41–13
Won NFC Championship (Rams) 30–3
Won Super Bowl XXIV (vs. Broncos) 55–10
1990 San Francisco 49ers [11] 14–2Won Divisional playoffs (Redskins) 28–10
Lost NFC Championship (Giants) 13–15
1991 New Orleans Saints 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (Falcons) 20–27
1992 San Francisco 49ers [12] 14–2Won Divisional playoffs (Redskins) 20–13
Lost NFC Championship (Cowboys) 20–30
1993 San Francisco 49ers [13] 10–6Won Divisional playoffs (Giants) 44–3
Lost NFC Championship (at Cowboys) 21–38
1994 San Francisco 49ers [14] 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Bears) 44–15
Won NFC Championship (Cowboys) 38–28
Won Super Bowl XXIX (vs. Chargers) 49–26
1995 San Francisco 49ers [15] 11–5Lost Divisional playoffs (Packers) 17–27
1996 Carolina Panthers 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Cowboys) 26–17
Lost NFC Championship (at Packers) 13–30
1997 San Francisco 49ers [16] 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Vikings) 38–22
Lost NFC Championship (Packers) 10–23
1998 Atlanta Falcons 14–2Won Divisional playoffs (49ers) 20–18
Won NFC Championship (at Vikings) 30–27 (OT)
Lost Super Bowl XXXIII (vs. Broncos) 19–34
1999 St. Louis Rams 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Vikings) 49-37
Won NFC Championship (Buccaneers) 11–6
Won Super Bowl XXXIV (vs. Titans) 23–16
2000 New Orleans Saints 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Rams) 31–28
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 16–34
2001 St. Louis Rams 14–2Won Divisional playoffs (Packers) 45–17
Won NFC Championship (Eagles) 29–24
Lost Super Bowl XXXVI (vs. Patriots) 17–20

Following 2001, the Atlanta Falcons, Carolina Panthers, and New Orleans Saints left the NFC West to join the newly formed NFC South. The Arizona Cardinals joined the NFC West from the NFC East, and the Seattle Seahawks joined from the AFC West to combine with the San Francisco 49ers and the St. Louis Rams to create the new NFC West.

SeasonTeamRecordPlayoff Results
NFC West
2002 San Francisco 49ers [17] 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Giants) 39–38
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Buccaneers) 6–31
2003 St. Louis Rams 12–4Lost Divisional playoffs (Panthers) 23–29 (2OT)
2004 Seattle Seahawks 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (Rams) 20–27
2005 Seattle Seahawks 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Redskins) 20–10
Won NFC Championship (Panthers) 34–14
Lost Super Bowl XL (vs. Steelers) 10–21
2006 Seattle Seahawks 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (Cowboys) 21–20
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Bears) 24–27 (OT)
2007 Seattle Seahawks 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Redskins) 35–14
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Packers) 20–42
2008 Arizona Cardinals 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (Falcons) 30–24
Won Divisional playoffs (at Panthers) 33–13
Won NFC Championship (Eagles) 32–25
Lost Super Bowl XLIII (vs. Steelers) 23–27
2009 Arizona Cardinals 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (Packers) 51–45 (OT)
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Saints) 14–45
2010 Seattle Seahawks 7–9Won Wild Card playoffs (Saints) 41–36
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Bears) 35–24
2011 San Francisco 49ers [18] 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Saints) 36–32
Lost NFC Championship (Giants) 17–20 (OT)
2012 San Francisco 49ers [19] 11–4–1Won Divisional playoffs (Packers) 45–31
Won NFC Championship (at Falcons) 28–24
Lost Super Bowl XLVII (vs. Ravens) 31–34
2013 Seattle Seahawks 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Saints) 23–15
Won NFC Championship (49ers) 23–17
Won Super Bowl XLVIII (vs. Broncos) 43–8
2014 Seattle Seahawks 12–4Won Divisional playoffs (Panthers) 31–17
Won NFC Championship (Packers) 28–22 (OT)
Lost Super Bowl XLIX (vs. Patriots) 24–28
2015 Arizona Cardinals 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Packers) 26–20 (OT)
Lost NFC Championship (at Panthers) 15–49
2016 Seattle Seahawks 10–5–1Won Wild Card playoffs (Lions) 26–6
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Falcons) 20–36
2017 Los Angeles Rams 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (Falcons) 13–26
2018 Los Angeles Rams 13–3 [20] Won Divisional playoffs (Cowboys) 30–22
Won NFC Championship (at Saints) 26–23 (OT)
Lost Super Bowl LIII (vs. Patriots) 3–13
2019 San Francisco 49ers [21] 13–3Won Divisional playoffs (Vikings) 27–10
Won NFC Championship (Packers) 37–20
Lost Super Bowl LIV (vs. Chiefs) 20–31
2020 Seattle Seahawks 12–4Lost Wild Card playoffs (Rams) 20–30

*A players' strike in 1982 reduced the regular season to nine games. Thus, the league used a special sixteen-team playoff tournament for that year only. Division standings were ignored, and Atlanta had the best record of the division teams.

Wild Card qualifiers

SeasonTeamRecordPlayoff Results
1978 Atlanta Falcons 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (Eagles) 14–13
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Cowboys) 20–27
1980 Los Angeles Rams 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Cowboys) 13–34
1983 Los Angeles Rams 9–7Won Wild Card playoffs (at Cowboys) 24–17
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Redskins) 7–51
1984 Los Angeles Rams 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (Giants) 13–16
1985 San Francisco 49ers 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Giants) 3–17
1986 Los Angeles Rams 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Redskins) 7–19
1987 New Orleans Saints 12–3Lost Wild Card playoffs (Vikings) 10–44
1988 Los Angeles Rams 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Vikings) 17–28
1989 Los Angeles Rams 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (at Eagles) 21–7
Won Divisional playoffs (at Giants) 19–13
Lost NFC Championship (at 49ers) 3–30
1990 New Orleans Saints 8–8Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Bears) 6–16
1991 Atlanta Falcons 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (at Saints) 27–20
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Redskins) 7–24
1992 New Orleans Saints 12–4Lost Wild Card playoffs (Eagles) 20–36
1995 Atlanta Falcons 9–7Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Packers) 20–37
1996 San Francisco 49ers 12–4Won Wild Card playoffs (Eagles) 14–0
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Packers) 14–35
1998 San Francisco 49ers 12–4Won Wild Card playoffs (Packers) 30–27
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Falcons) 18–20
2000 St. Louis Rams 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Saints) 28–31
2001 San Francisco 49ers 12–4Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Packers) 15–25
2003 Seattle Seahawks 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Packers) 27–33 (OT)
2004 St. Louis Rams 8–8Won Wild Card playoffs (at Seahawks) 27–20
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Falcons) 17–47
2012 Seattle Seahawks 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (at Redskins) 24–14
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Falcons) 28–30
2013 San Francisco 49ers 12–4Won Wild Card playoffs (at Packers) 23–20
Won Divisional playoffs (at Panthers) 23–10
Lost NFC Championship (at Seahawks) 17–23
2014 Arizona Cardinals 11–5Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Panthers) 16–27
2015 Seattle Seahawks 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (at Vikings) 10–9
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Panthers) 24–31
2018 Seattle Seahawks 10–6Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Cowboys) 22–24
2019 Seattle Seahawks 11–5Won Wild Card playoffs (at Eagles) 17–9
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Packers) 23–28
2020 Los Angeles Rams 10–6Won Wild Card playoffs (at Seahawks) 30–20
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Packers) 18–32

*A players' strike in 1982 reduced the regular season to nine games. Thus, the league used a special sixteen-team playoff tournament for that year only. Division standings were ignored.

Season results

(#)Denotes team that won the Super Bowl
(#)Denotes team that won the NFC/NFL Championship, but lost Super Bowl
(#)Denotes team that qualified for the NFL Playoffs
SeasonTeam (record)
1st2nd3rd4th5th
1967 Los Angeles [a] (11–1–2) Baltimore (11–1–2) San Francisco (7–7) Atlanta (1–12–1)
1968 Baltimore [b] (13–1) Los Angeles (10–3–1) San Francisco (7–6–1) Atlanta (2–12)
1969 Los Angeles (11–3) Baltimore (8–5–1) Atlanta (6–8) San Francisco (4–8–2)
The Coastal Division became the NFC West.
1970 San Francisco (10–3–1) Los Angeles (9–4–1) Atlanta (4–8–2) New Orleans (2–11–1)
1971 San Francisco (9–5) Los Angeles (8–5–1) Atlanta (7–6–1) New Orleans (4–8–2)
1972 San Francisco (8–5–1) Atlanta (7–7) Los Angeles (6–7–1) New Orleans (2–11–1)
1973 Los Angeles (12–2) Atlanta (9–5) San Francisco (5–9) New Orleans (5–9)
1974 Los Angeles (10–4) San Francisco (6–8) New Orleans (5–9) Atlanta (3–11)
1975 (2) Los Angeles (12–2) San Francisco (5–9) Atlanta (4–10) New Orleans (2–12)
1976 (3) Los Angeles (10–3–1) San Francisco (8–6) Atlanta (4–10) New Orleans (4–10) Seattle (2–12)
1977 (2) Los Angeles (10–4) Atlanta (7–7) San Francisco (5–9) New Orleans (3–11)
1978 (1) Los Angeles (12–4)(4) Atlanta (9–7) New Orleans (7–9) San Francisco (2–14)
1979 (3) Los Angeles (9–7) New Orleans (8–8) Atlanta (6–10) San Francisco (2–14)
1980 (1) Atlanta (12–4)(5) Los Angeles (11–5) San Francisco (6–10) New Orleans (1–15)
1981 (1) San Francisco (13–3) Atlanta (7–9) Los Angeles (6–10) New Orleans (4–12)
1982^ [c] (5) Atlanta (5–4) New Orleans (4–5) San Francisco (3–6) L.A. Rams (2–7)
1983 (2) San Francisco (10–6)(5) L.A. Rams (9–7) New Orleans (8–8) Atlanta (7–9)
1984 (1) San Francisco (15–1)(4) L.A. Rams (10–6) New Orleans (7–9) Atlanta (4–12)
1985 (2) L.A. Rams (11–5)(5) San Francisco
(10–6)
New Orleans (5–11) Atlanta (4–12)
1986 (3) San Francisco (10–5–1)(5) L.A. Rams (10–6) Atlanta (7–8–1) New Orleans (7–9)
1987 (1) San Francisco (13–2)(4) New Orleans (12–3) L.A. Rams (6–9) Atlanta (3–12)
1988 (2) San Francisco (10–6)(5) L.A. Rams (10–6) New Orleans (10–6) Atlanta (5–11)
1989 (1) San Francisco (14–2)(5) L.A. Rams (11–5) New Orleans (9–7) Atlanta (3–13)
1990 (1) San Francisco (14–2)(6) New Orleans (8–8) L.A. Rams (5–11) Atlanta (5–11)
1991 (3) New Orleans (11–5)(6) Atlanta (10–6) San Francisco (10–6) L.A. Rams (3–13)
1992 (1) San Francisco (14–2)(4) New Orleans (12–4) Atlanta (6–10) L.A. Rams (6–10)
1993 (2) San Francisco (10–6) New Orleans (8–8) Atlanta (6–10) L.A. Rams (5–11)
1994 (1) San Francisco (13–3) New Orleans (7–9) Atlanta (7–9) L.A. Rams (4–12)
1995 (2) San Francisco (11–5)(6) Atlanta (9–7) St. Louis (7–9) Carolina (7–9) New Orleans (7–9)
1996 (2) Carolina (12–4)(4) San Francisco (12–4) St. Louis (6–10) Atlanta (3–13) New Orleans (3–13)
1997 (1) San Francisco (13–3) Carolina (7–9) Atlanta (7–9) New Orleans (6–10) St. Louis (5–11)
1998 (2) Atlanta (14–2)(4) San Francisco (12–4) New Orleans (6–10) Carolina (4–12) St. Louis (4–12)
1999 (1) St. Louis (13–3) Carolina (8–8) Atlanta (5–11) San Francisco (4–12) New Orleans (3–13)
2000 (3) New Orleans (10–6)(6) St. Louis (10–6) Carolina (7–9) San Francisco (6–10) Atlanta (4–12)
2001 (1) St. Louis (14–2)(5) San Francisco (12–4) New Orleans (7–9) Atlanta (7–9) Carolina (1–15)
2002 (4) San Francisco (10–6) St. Louis (7–9) Seattle (7–9) Arizona (5–11)
2003 (2) St. Louis (12–4)(5) Seattle (10–6) San Francisco (7–9) Arizona (4–12)
2004 (4) Seattle (9–7)(5) St. Louis (8–8) Arizona (6–10) San Francisco (2–14)
2005 (1) Seattle (13–3) St. Louis (6–10) Arizona (5–11) San Francisco (4–12)
2006 (4) Seattle (9–7) St. Louis (8–8) San Francisco (7–9) Arizona (5–11)
2007 (3) Seattle (10–6) Arizona (8–8) San Francisco (5–11) St. Louis (3–13)
2008 (4) Arizona (9–7) San Francisco (7–9) Seattle (4–12) St. Louis (2–14)
2009 (4) Arizona (10–6) San Francisco (8–8) Seattle (5–11) St. Louis (1–15)
2010 (4) Seattle (7–9) St. Louis (7–9) San Francisco (6–10) Arizona (5–11)
2011 (2) San Francisco (13–3) Arizona (8–8) Seattle (7–9) St. Louis (2–14)
2012 (2) San Francisco (11–4–1)(5) Seattle (11–5) St. Louis (7–8–1) Arizona (5–11)
2013 (1) Seattle (13–3)(5) San Francisco (12–4) Arizona (10–6) St. Louis (7–9)
2014 (1) Seattle (12–4)(5) Arizona (11–5) San Francisco (8–8) St. Louis (6–10)
2015 (2) Arizona (13–3)(6) Seattle (10–6) St. Louis (7–9) San Francisco (5–11)
2016 (3) Seattle (10–5–1) Arizona (7–8–1) Los Angeles (4–12) San Francisco (2–14)
2017 (3) L.A. Rams (11–5) Seattle (9–7) Arizona (8–8) San Francisco (6–10)
2018 (2) L.A. Rams (13–3)(5) Seattle (10–6) San Francisco (4–12) Arizona (3–13)
2019 (1) San Francisco (13–3)(5) Seattle (11–5) L.A. Rams (9–7) Arizona (5–10–1)
2020 (3) Seattle (12–4)(6) L.A. Rams (10–6) Arizona (8–8) San Francisco (6–10)
Notes and Tiebreakers

See also

Total playoff berths

(Current NFC West teams' records 1967–2020)
TeamDivision
Championships
Playoff
Berths
Super Bowl
Appearances
Super Bowl
Wins
San Francisco 49ers 120 (4)25 (5)7 (2)5 (0)
St. Louis/Los Angeles Rams 115 (3)24 (5)4 (1)1 (0)
Seattle Seahawks 291431
St. Louis/Phoenix/Arizona Cardinals 23410
1Numbers since re-alignment in parenthesis
2These numbers only reflect the Seahawks & Cardinals' time as members of the NFC West.

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49ers–Rams rivalry National Football League cross-state rivalry in California

The 49ers–Rams rivalry or the Battle of California is a rivalry between the San Francisco 49ers and the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League. The rivalry began in 1950 and became one of the most intense in the National Football League in the 1970s as the two California based teams regularly competed for the NFC West Division title. The intensity of the rivalry is also due to the fact that Northern California and Southern California have long been competitors in the economic, cultural, and political arenas.

Sean McVay American football coach

Sean McVay is an American football coach who is the head coach for the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League (NFL). He became the Rams' head coach in 2017 at the age of 30, the youngest head coach in modern NFL history. McVay is also the youngest head coach to qualify for the postseason, win a playoff game, appear in the Super Bowl, and be named the AP NFL Coach of the Year.

As with all sports leagues, there are a number of significant rivalries in the National Football League (NFL). Rivalries are occasionally created due to a particular event that causes bad blood between teams, players, coaches, or owners, but for the most part, they arise simply due to the frequency with which some teams play each other, and sometimes exist for geographic reasons.

This is a list of playoff records set by various teams in various categories in the National Football League during the Super Bowl Era.

The 2011 San Francisco 49ers season was the franchise's 66th season overall, and 62nd in the National Football League (NFL). It was the first season under head coach Jim Harbaugh and general manager Trent Baalke. The 49ers rebounded from their disappointing 2010 season to end their streak of eight consecutive non-winning seasons. After defeating the St. Louis Rams in week 13 and attaining a 10–2 record, the team clinched the NFC West and made their first playoff appearance since 2002. The 49ers ended the regular season with a 13–3 record, their best since 1997, and earned a bye in the first round of the playoffs. In the Divisional Playoffs they defeated the New Orleans Saints 36–32 and were in the NFC Championship for the first time since 1997- they lost to the eventual Super Bowl champion New York Giants in overtime by a score of 20–17, coming just short of returning to the Super Bowl for the first time since 1994. Despite their most successful season in years, the 49ers were 31st in the league in third-down conversion percentage in the regular season (29.1) and were 17.9 percent in the playoffs.

The 49ers–Seahawks rivalry is an American football rivalry between the San Francisco 49ers and Seattle Seahawks in the National Football League (NFL). While the teams first met in 1976, the rivalry did not develop until 2002, when the Seahawks were placed with the 49ers in the NFC West, allowing for two annual meetings between the teams. The Seahawks lead the series 28–17. The teams met once in the playoffs, a 23–17 Seahawks win in the 2013 NFC Championship Game.

2019 San Francisco 49ers season 74th season in franchise history; seventh Super Bowl appearance

The 2019 season was the San Francisco 49ers' 70th in the National Football League (NFL), their 74th overall and their third under the head coach-general manager tandem of Kyle Shanahan and John Lynch. They finished their 2019 season with a 13–3 record, their best finish since 2011. Starting the season 8–0 for the first time since 1990, the 49ers surpassed their win totals from the 2016, 2017, and 2018 seasons combined. The 49ers were the second straight NFC West team to start 8–0, with the other being the 2018 Rams. With a Week 11 win over the Arizona Cardinals, the 49ers clinched their first winning season since 2013. Despite a loss to the Atlanta Falcons in Week 15, the 49ers clinched a playoff spot for the first time since 2013 with a Los Angeles Rams loss. The 49ers beat the Cardinals for the first time since 2014, won in Seattle for the first time since 2011, and beat the Panthers in the regular season for the first time since 2001.

References

  1. "Famine is Over for S.F." Independent. Long Beach, California. Combined News Services. December 21, 1970. p. 31 via Newspapers.com.
  2. "49ers Claim NFC West Crown". The Argus. Fremont, California. UPI. December 20, 1971. p. 10 via Newspapers.com.
  3. Smolich, Marco (December 17, 1972). "49ers Squeak By for West Title". The Sacramento Bee. Sacramento, California. p. 6 via Newspapers.com.
  4. Brockmann, Dave (December 27, 1981). "Resurging 49ers: Best NFL Record, NFC West Champions". Santa Cruz Sentinel. Santa Cruz, California. p. 73.
  5. Vyeda, Ed (December 20, 1983). "49ers Destroy Dallas to Win NFC West". Santa Cruz Sentinel. Santa Cruz, California. p. D1 via Newspapers.com.
  6. "Forced to Go on the Defensive, 49ers Still Win". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. Times Wire Services. December 3, 1984. pp. 3–9.
  7. Murray, William D. (December 22, 1986). "Niners Defense Rip Rams 24–14". The Press-Tribune. Roseville, California. United Press International. p. 19 via Newspapers.com.
  8. Soltau, Mark (December 28, 1987). "49ers Storm to the Title". The San Francisco Examiner. San Francisco, California. p. F1 via Newspapers.com.
  9. Kotala, Carl (December 19, 1988). "Humbled 49ers Feeling Defenseless". The San Bernardino County Sun. San Bernardino, California. Gannett News Service. p. C2 via Newspapers.com.
  10. Waldner, Mike (December 12, 1989). "Comeback Kids Reverse Role". News-Pilot. San Pedro, California. p. B1.
  11. Jenkins, Jim (December 3, 1990). "Super Bowl XXIV1/2 is Finally Here". Santa Cruz Sentinel. Santa Cruz, California. p. B3 via Newspapers.com.
  12. Georgatos, Dennis (December 20, 1992). "49ers Wrap Up NFC West, Home Field". The Hanford Sentinel. Hanford, California. Associated Press. p. 14 via Newspapers.com.
  13. Atkins, Harry. "Young Guns 49ers Past Lions, 55–17". The San Bernardino County Sun. San Bernardino, California. Associated Press. p. C4 via Newspapers.com.
  14. Schumacher, John (November 29, 1994). "49ers Not Satisfied with Title". Santa Maria Times. Santa Maria, California. p. C1 via Newspapers.com.
  15. Georgatos, Dennis (December 18, 1995). "San Francisco Wants to Stay Home for Playoffs". The Napa Valley Register. Napa, California. Associated Press. p. B1 via Newspapers.com.
  16. Peterson, Anne M. (November 17, 1997). "49ers Win NFC West". The Hanford Sentinel. Hanford, California. Associated Press. p. 8 via Newspapers.com.
  17. "49ers Clinch NFC West with Comeback Win Over Dallas". Tulare Advance-Register. Tulare, California. Associated Press. December 9, 2002. p. B1 via Newspapers.com.
  18. McCauley, Janie (December 5, 2011). "San Francisco is Playoff Bound". Santa Maria Times. Santa Maria, California. Associated Press. p. B1 via Newspapers.com.
  19. Gackle, Paul (December 31, 2012). "Win Not Enough to Erase Concerns". The San Francisco Examiner. San Francisco, California. p. A18 via Newspapers.com.
  20. "NFL Standings". www.nfl.com. Retrieved February 4, 2019.
  21. Sanchez III, Jose Luis (December 29, 2019). "49ers Go Against History in Seattle to Clinch NFC West". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 23, 2020.