NRK

Last updated
Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation
NRK
Norsk rikskringkasting
Publicly funded, public-service broadcaster
Industry Broadcasting
PredecessorKringkastningsselskapet A/S (1925)
Founded1 July 1933;86 years ago (1933-07-01) [1]
Headquarters Oslo, Norway
Key people
Thor Gjermund Eriksen
Products
Owner Government of Norway
Number of employees
3,419; 266 temporary staff (2017) [2]
Website nrk.no

NRK (an abbreviation of the Norwegian: Norsk rikskringkasting AS , generally expressed in English as the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation) is the Norwegian government-owned radio and television public broadcasting company, and the largest media organisation in Norway. All other TV channels, broadcast from Norway, were banned from 1960 until 1981. NRK broadcasts three national TV channels and three national radio channels on digital terrestrial television, digital terrestrial radio and subscription television. All NRK radio stations are being streamed online at NRK.no, which also offers an extensive TV service. NRK is a founding member of the European Broadcasting Union. [3]

Norwegian language North Germanic language spoken in Norway

Norwegian is a North Germanic language spoken mainly in Norway, where it is the official language. Along with Swedish and Danish, Norwegian forms a dialect continuum of more or less mutually intelligible local and regional varieties; some Norwegian and Swedish dialects, in particular, are very close. These Scandinavian languages, together with Faroese and Icelandic as well as some extinct languages, constitute the North Germanic languages. Faroese and Icelandic are not mutually intelligible with Norwegian in their spoken form because continental Scandinavian has diverged from them. While the two Germanic languages with the greatest numbers of speakers, English and German, have close similarities with Norwegian, neither is mutually intelligible with it. Norwegian is a descendant of Old Norse, the common language of the Germanic peoples living in Scandinavia during the Viking Era.

Aksjeselskap Norwegian form of a private company with limited liability

Aksjeselskap is the Norwegian term for a stock-based company. It is usually abbreviated AS. An AS is always a limited company, i.e. the owners cannot be held liable for any debt beyond the stock capital. Public companies are called Allmennaksjeselskap (ASA) while companies without limited liability are called Ansvarlig selskap (ANS).

Radio Technology of using radio waves to carry information

Radio is the technology of signaling and communicating using radio waves. Radio waves are electromagnetic waves of frequency between 30 hertz (Hz) and 300 gigahertz (GHz). They are generated by an electronic device called a transmitter connected to an antenna which radiates the waves, and received by a radio receiver connected to another antenna. Radio is very widely used in modern technology, in radio communication, radar, radio navigation, remote control, remote sensing and other applications. In radio communication, used in radio and television broadcasting, cell phones, two-way radios, wireless networking and satellite communication among numerous other uses, radio waves are used to carry information across space from a transmitter to a receiver, by modulating the radio signal in the transmitter. In radar, used to locate and track objects like aircraft, ships, spacecraft and missiles, a beam of radio waves emitted by a radar transmitter reflects off the target object, and the reflected waves reveal the object's location. In radio navigation systems such as GPS and VOR, a mobile receiver receives radio signals from navigational radio beacons whose position is known, and by precisely measuring the arrival time of the radio waves the receiver can calculate its position on Earth. In wireless radio remote control devices like drones, garage door openers, and keyless entry systems, radio signals transmitted from a controller device control the actions of a remote device.

Contents

Financing

About 94% of NRK's funding comes from a mandatory annual licence fee payable by anyone who owns or uses a TV or device capable of receiving TV broadcasts. The remainder comes from commercial activities such as programme and DVD sales, spin-off products, and certain types of sponsorship. NRK's license income in 2012 was more than 5 billion kroner. In the autumn of 2015, the government announced that it planned to change the way NRK is financed. This is in part a reaction to the decline of TV ownership in Norway. In March 2019, it was decided to liquidate the broadcasting fee from 1 January 2020.

Television licence official permission required in many countries for the reception of television broadcasts

A television licence or broadcast receiving licence is a payment required in many countries for the reception of television broadcasts, or the possession of a television set where some broadcasts are funded in full or in part by the licence fee paid. The fee is sometimes also required to own a radio or receive radio broadcasts. A TV licence is therefore effectively a hypothecated tax for the purpose of funding public broadcasting, thus allowing public broadcasters to transmit television programmes without, or with only supplemental, funding from radio and television advertisements. However, in some cases the balance between public funding and advertisements is the opposite – the Polish TVP broadcaster receives more funds from advertisements than from its TV tax.

History

NRK television tower in Trondheim Tyholttarnet in Trondheim 5.jpg
NRK television tower in Trondheim

Kringkastningsselskapet A/S, a privately owned company and the predecessor of NRK, started regular radio broadcasts in Norway in 1925. NRK itself was founded in 1933. Based on a model similar to that of the BBC and located in Oslo, it was a replacement for privately operated radio stations in larger cities. NRK initially set out to cover the entire country and had a monopoly on broadcasting in Norway. The monopoly came under intense pressure when Norwegian TV companies began broadcasting from abroad in addition to international cable TV. Cabel TV started in 1982 and satellite TV in 1986 (the launch of TV3 in 1987 and TVNorge in 1988). It was finally with the launch of TV2, a Bergen-based free-to-air channel, in 1992 the monopoly on TV-broadcasting in Norway, ended.

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is a British public service broadcaster. Its headquarters are at Broadcasting House in Westminster, London, and it is the world's oldest national broadcasting organisation and the largest broadcaster in the world by number of employees. It employs over 22,000 staff in total, more than 16,000 of whom are in public sector broadcasting. The total number of staff is 35,402 when part-time, flexible, and fixed-contract staff are included.

Oslo Capital of Norway

Oslo is the capital and most populous city of Norway. It constitutes both a county and a municipality. Founded in the year 1040 as Ánslo, and established as a kaupstad or trading place in 1048 by Harald Hardrada, the city was elevated to a bishopric in 1070 and a capital under Haakon V of Norway around 1300. Personal unions with Denmark from 1397 to 1523 and again from 1536 to 1814 reduced its influence. After being destroyed by a fire in 1624, during the reign of King Christian IV, a new city was built closer to Akershus Fortress and named Christiania in the king's honour. It was established as a municipality (formannskapsdistrikt) on 1 January 1838. The city functioned as a co-official capital during the 1814 to 1905 Union between Sweden and Norway. In 1877, the city's name was respelled Kristiania in accordance with an official spelling reform – a change that was taken over by the municipal authorities only in 1897. In 1925 the city, after incorporating the village retaining its former name, was renamed Oslo.

Satellite television television content transmitted via signals from orbiting satellites

Satellite television is a service that delivers television programming to viewers by relaying it from a communications satellite orbiting the Earth directly to the viewer's location. The signals are received via an outdoor parabolic antenna commonly referred to as a satellite dish and a low-noise block downconverter.

During the Nazi German occupation, Norwegian transmitters were used to broadcast Nazi German war propaganda to Northern Europe (particularly Scotland and the northern half of Ireland, where the sea path ensured a good signal) and Scandinavia.

Prior to the Nazi German occupation, NRK had also been partly financed by radio commercials.

NRK was one of 23 founding broadcasting organisations of the European Broadcasting Union, which was founded in 1950. In 1954, NRK started broadcasting television shows, on a trial basis. Regular broadcasts started in 1960.

European Broadcasting Union alliance of public service media entities

The European Broadcasting Union is an alliance of public service media organisations, established on 12 February 1950. The organisation is made up of 116 member organisations in 56 countries, and 34 associate members from a further 21 countries. It is best known for producing the Eurovision Song Contest. It also hosted debates between candidates for the European Commission presidency for the 2014 and 2019 parliamentary elections but is unrelated to the European Union itself.

NRK was the last of the major European public broadcasters to introduce a second radio station,[ citation needed ] officially starting as late as 1984. In 1993, NRK launched a third radio station, the youth-oriented P3 . A 24-hour station for classical music, Alltid Klassisk (now called "NRK Klassisk"), introduced in 1995, was the first of its kind to be broadcast digitally using digital audio broadcasting. The 24-hour news station Alltid Nyheter started in 1997, followed by a radio station for teenagers, mP3, in 2000, which mostly plays dance music.

NRK P3 Norwegian digital radio channel

NRK P3 is a nationwide digital radio channel operated by the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK). It was established as NRK's third radio channel in 1993, and was the result of the NRK radio channel reform initiated in 1992 by radio director Tor Fuglevik.

NRK Klassisk Norwegian digital radio station

NRK Klassisk is a digital radio channel operated by the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK) which broadcasts classical music 24 hours a day.

In 1996, a second television channel, NRK2, was launched. The original television channel is now known as NRK1. On 3 September 2007, NRK launched its third channel: a youth channel called NRK3. Later that year, on 1 December, NRK launched its fourth television channel, NRK Super, which is aimed at children. NRK3 and NRK Super share the same channel, with NRK Super broadcasting from 06:00 to 19:30 and NRK3 from 19:30 to 06:00.

In 1999, following NRK Interaktiv's relaunch as NRK.no, NRK introduced a new corporate logo which similar to its predecessor. The new corporate logo made its first appearance in an ident in 2000 by making its overhaul to NRK's radio and television channels.

A traditional music radio station, NRK Alltid folkemusikk (now known as "NRK Folkemusikk") was launched in 2004 on DAB and internet radio.

Broadcasting House, one of the main buildings at NRK headquarters at Marienlyst, Oslo NRK radiohuset Marienlyst.jpg
Broadcasting House, one of the main buildings at NRK headquarters at Marienlyst, Oslo

NRK's international radio transmissions, known as Utenlandssendingen, began shortwave transmission in 1948. Initially broadcasting in Norwegian, English-language programs were added later. The service was discontinued on 1 January 2002. All NRK broadcasting activities on shortwave ceased on 1 January 2004. NRK's mediumwave transmitter at Kvitsøy on 1314 kHz used to be widely heard internationally and was one of the most commonly heard trans-Atlantic DX signals in eastern North America. The frequency carried a mixture of NRK's radio channels P1 and P2, and was called Europakanalen (literally "The Europe Channel"). However, these mediumwave transmissions were discontinued on 1 July 2006.

All of NRK's radio stations are now available on the internet. Several of NRK's television programmes are also available on the internet.

On 16 April 2015, the Norwegian Ministry of Culture announced its intention to eventually switch off all FM transmitters in the country, with the first such transmitter expected to be switched off on 11 January 2017, therefore making Norway the first country in the world to completely transition to digital radio. According to the Ministry of Culture, the decision was justified because transmitting through the FM network was eight times more expensive than transmitting through digital audio broadcasting, and because only five national radio stations are transmitting on FM, compared to the 42 digital radio stations allocated in Norway, with 22 stations transmitting on the latter. NRK Radio is expected to transition from FM to digital radio before commercial radio stations do so. [4] [5] [6]

NRK claims to have the longest-running radio show, Lørdagsbarnetimen (The Saturday Children's Hour), running since 20 December 1924.[ citation needed ]

Organisation

Entrance to Television House, another building at NRK's headquarters NRK Fjernsynshuset 3.jpg
Entrance to Television House, another building at NRK's headquarters

The CEO began major organisational changes in 2008, with the aim of creating a more agile NRK, while still adhering to the principles of the broadcaster-producer model introduced in January 2001.[ citation needed ] By January 2009, the number of programme-producing divisions had been reduced from five to three, separated more along geographical than functional lines, and at the same time simplifying trading in the internal market.[ citation needed ] The programme-producing divisions are:

Thor Gjermund Eriksen has been director-general of the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation since 12 March 2013. [7] The previous directors were Olav Midttun (1934–1947, except during the Nazi occupation), Kaare Fostervoll (1948–1962), Hans Jacob Ustvedt (1962–1971), Torolf Elster (1972–1981), Bjartmar Gjerde (1981–1988), Einar Førde (1989–2001), John G. Bernander (2001–2007) [8] and Hans-Tore Bjerkaas (2007-2012). After WW2, all but Hans-Tore Bjerkaas and John G. Bernander had been active politically in socialist parties. The current director-general, Thor Gjermund Eriksen, came from Sosialistisk Venstre parti(SV), a membership he resigned 4 days before the date of accession.

The chairman of the board is Birger Magnus, Marius Lillelien heads the broadcasting department, and the head of the news department is Marius Tetlie. [9] In 2017, NRK employed 3 419 and 266 temporary staff. [10]

Notable television programmes

NRK productions

Other shows

Channels

Radio

1All FM broadcast by NRK radio will close during 2017, to be replaced by Internet and DAB + only
a Available on FM in only some parts of the country
b DAB, DVB-T and internet radio

c DAB only
d Internet radio only

Television

Regional broadcasting

NRK has 12 regional offices around Norway. Each office has its own broadcasts on both television (on NRK 1) and radio (on NRK P1), as well their own news sites on the internet. They also contribute news coverage to national news programmes. NRK's headquarters are at Marienlyst in Oslo and Tyholt in Trondheim.

FM radio switch-off

Norway was the first country to announce a complete switch-off of national FM radio stations, including NRK P1 with regional services, NRK P2 and NRK P3, NRK mP3 and NRK Alltid Nyheter. Switch off started on 11 January 2017, and ended on 13 December 2017.

From 2018, all FM transmitters are replaced with broadcast via DAB +, internet and cable. [11]

High definition

NRK has an HD outside broadcast van, producing high-definition video. [12] The first Norwegian series filmed in HD was En Udødelig Mann ("An Immortal Man") about the young Henrik Ibsen. The action six-part miniseries called Kodenavn Hunter was also filmed in HD. Promotional videos are freely downloadable from NRK's site, and the full-length last episode is available. [13]

NRK uses H.264 as the compression codec for the digital terrestrial network which is commonly used to compress videos stored as mp4. [14]

NRK has also started to offer HD content via BitTorrent. This is currently a very limited offer due to rights restrictions, but it is growing steadily. [15]

In preparation for the Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver, NRK announced that they would launch a high-definition channel, and their first native HD broadcast would be from Vancouver. NRK1 HD is a simulcast of NRK1. [16]

Website

Its website, nrk.no, has had an online presence supporting its TV and radio programmes and web-only initiatives since 1996. Its development had started in 1995.

See also

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NRK1 Norwegian television channel

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NRK P1 Norwegian main digital radio channel

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References

  1. "NRK fyller 80 år" (in Norwegian). nrk.no. 2013-06-29. Retrieved 2015-08-10.
  2. "Årsregnskapet 2017 (Annual Report)" (PDF) (in Norwegian). nrk.no. Retrieved 2018-08-08.
  3. "about NRK - information in other languages". Nrk.no. Retrieved 2014-05-17.
  4. "Norway announces nationwide FM radio shut-off". Venturebeat. Retrieved 2015-04-26.
  5. "Norway will lead the effort to switch off FM radio". Engadget . Retrieved 2015-04-26.
  6. "FM radio switch-off looms in Norway". BBC News . Retrieved 2015-04-26.
  7. Nina Berglund: New NRK boss gets down to work Views and News from Norway, 12 March 2012
  8. "Kringkastingssjefene - Om NRK - Organisasjon". Nrk.no. Retrieved 2014-05-17.
  9. "Slik er NRK organisert" (in Norwegian). nrk.no. Retrieved 2018-08-08.
  10. "Årsregnskapet 2017 (Annual Report)" (PDF) (in Norwegian). nrk.no. Retrieved 2018-08-08.
  11. "Norveška ukinja FM-radio". Val 202.
  12. "Skandinavias mest avanserte". Nordic Media Festival. Archived from the original on 2007-08-10. Retrieved 2007-08-15.
  13. "Hunter - NRK". 20.nrk.no. Archived from the original on 2013-10-27. Retrieved 2014-05-17.
  14. "Overgangen til digitalt bakkenett – Norges televisjon (NTV)". Ntv.no. Retrieved 2014-05-17.
  15. "NRKBeta - Bittorrent (Norwegian)". Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 2009-04-24.
  16. "NRK1 i HD fra 12. February 2010 (Norwegian)". Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 2010-02-09.

Coordinates: 59°56′6.21″N10°43′6.79″E / 59.9350583°N 10.7185528°E / 59.9350583; 10.7185528