Nahiyah

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A nāḥiyah (Arabic : نَاحَيِة [ˈnaːħijah] , plural nawāḥīنَوَاحِي [naˈwaːħiː] ), or nahia, is a regional or local type of administrative division that usually consists of a number of villages or sometimes smaller towns. In Tajikistan, it is a second-level division while in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan, Xinjiang, and the former Ottoman Empire, where it was also called a bucak , it is a third-level or lower division. It can constitute a division of a qadaa , mintaqah or other such district-type of division and is sometimes translated as "subdistrict".

Contents

Examples

Arabic-speaking countries

CountryLevel above (Arabic)Level above (English)Main article
Syria mintaqah (formerly qadaa) district
Iraq Qadaa district Subdistricts of Iraq
Lebanon
Jordan Liwa' governorate Nahias of Jordan

Turkic-speaking territories

Other


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