Nakayoshi

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Nakayoshi
Nakayoshi199910.jpg
October 1999 issue of Nakayoshi featuring art by Natsumi Ando
Categories Shōjo manga [1] [2]
FrequencyMonthly
Circulation 103,333 [2]
(July-September, 2016)
First issueDecember 1954;66 years ago (1954-12)
Company Kodansha
CountryJapan
Based inTokyo
LanguageJapanese
Website Nakayoshi

Nakayoshi (なかよし, "Good Friends") is a monthly shōjo manga magazine published by Kodansha in Japan. First issued in December 1954, it is a long-running magazine with over 60 years of manga publication history. The target demographic for Nakayoshi (like Ribon and Ciao ) is teenage girls. Roughly the size of a phone book (hence the term "phone book manga"), the magazine generally comes with furoku, or small gifts, such as pop-out figures, games, small bags, posters, stickers, and so on. The furoku is an attempt to encourage girls to buy their own copies of the magazine rather than just share with a friend.

Contents

It is one of the best-selling shōjo manga magazines, having sold over 400 million copies since 1978. In the mid-1990s, Nakayoshi retailed for 400 yen and had an average of 448 pages. The estimated average circulation of Nakayoshi at this time was 1,800,000. [3] Its circulation peaked at 2,100,000 in 1993. [4] In 2007, its circulation was 400,000. [5]

During the 1990s, then editor-in-chief, Yoshio Irie attempted to move the magazine away from "first love" stories and introduced several fantasy manga such as Sailor Moon . During that period, Nakayoshi pursued a "media-mix" campaign, which involved close coordination of the magazine, anime productions based on the manga, and character merchandising. [6] Nakayoshi is also published on the 6th of each month.

Serializations

Current

Past

Circulation

Year / PeriodMonthly circulationMagazine sales
19781,600,000 [8] 19,200,000 [8]
19791,800,000 [9] 21,600,000 [9]
19801,700,000 [10] 20,400,000 [10]
19811,400,000 [11] 16,800,000 [11]
19821,200,000 [12] 14,400,000 [12]
19831,200,000 [12] 14,400,000 [12]
19841,250,000 [13] 15,000,000 [13]
19851,250,000 [14] 15,000,000 [14]
19861,250,000 [15] 15,000,000 [15]
19871,250,000 [16] 15,000,000 [16]
19881,350,000 [17] 16,200,000 [17]
19891,350,000 [18] 16,200,000 [18]
19901,200,000 [19] 14,400,000 [19]
19911,200,000 [20] 14,400,000 [20]
19921,400,000 [21] 16,800,000 [21]
January 1993 to March 19931,750,000 [22] 5,250,000 [22]
April 1993 to March 19932,100,000 [4] 25,200,000 [4]
April 1994 to December 19941,750,000 [22] 15,750,000 [22]
19951,500,000 [22] 18,000,000 [22]
19961,100,000 [22] 13,200,000 [22]
1997780,000 [22] 9,360,000 [22]
1998530,000 [22] 6,360,000 [22]
1999500,000 [22] 6,000,000 [22]
2000500,000 [22] 6,000,000 [22]
2001520,000 [22] 6,240,000 [22]
2002550,000 [22] 6,600,000 [22]
2003490,000 [22] 5,880,000 [22]
2004500,000 [22] 6,000,000 [22]
2005460,000 [22] 5,520,000 [22]
2006418,500 [23] 5,022,000 [23]
2007400,000 [5] 4,800,000 [5]
January 2008 to September 2008343,750 [24] 3,093,750 [24]
October 2008 to September 2009306,667 [24] 3,680,004 [24]
October 2009 to September 2010252,084 [24] 3,025,008 [24]
October 2010 to December 2010250,000 [25] 750,000 [25]
January 2011 to September 2011198,910 [24] 1,790,190 [24]
October 2011 to September 2012170,834 [24] 2,050,008 [24]
October 2012 to September 2013152,667 [24] 1,832,004 [24]
October 2013 to September 2014137,500 [24] 1,650,000 [24]
October 2014 to September 2015124,542 [26] 1,494,504 [26]
October 2015 to September 2016104,083 [27] 2,180,004 [27]
October 2016 to September 201796,608 [28] 2,075,004 [27]
October 2017 to March 201889,125 [29] 534,750 [29]
1978 to March 2018414,137,226

International versions

An Indonesian language version, Nakayoshi: Gress!, is published monthly by Elex Media Komputindo in Indonesia. The series has been canceled effectively in January 2017.

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