Nampo

Last updated
Nampo

남포시
남포특별시
Korean transcription(s)
   Chosŏn'gŭl
   Hancha
   McCune-Reischauer Namp'o-t'ŭkpyŏlsi
   Revised Romanization Nampo-teukbyeolsi
Nampo Montage.JPG
Views of Nampo
DPRK2006 Pyongnam-Nampo.PNG
Map of South Pyongan showing the location of Nampo
Nampo
North Korea adm location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Nampo
Location in North Korea
Coordinates: 38°44′N125°24′E / 38.733°N 125.400°E / 38.733; 125.400 Coordinates: 38°44′N125°24′E / 38.733°N 125.400°E / 38.733; 125.400
CountryFlag of North Korea.svg  North Korea
Province South P'yŏngan
Administrative divisions 5 kuyok, 2 kun
Government
  Party Committee Chairman Ri Jae-nam [1] (WPK)
  People's Committee Chairman Ri Kil-chun [2]
Area
  Total829 km2 (320 sq mi)
Population
 (2008)
  Total366,815 [3]
  Dialect
P'yŏngan
Time zone UTC+9 (Pyongyang Time)

Nampo (North Korean official spelling: Nampho; pronounced  [nam.pʰo] ), also spelled Namp'o, is a city and seaport in South Pyongan Province, North Korea, which lies on the northern shore of the Taedong River, 15 km east of the river's mouth. Formerly known as Chinnamp'o, it was a provincial-level "Directly Governed City" ("Chikhalsi") from 1980 to 2004, and was designated a "Special City" ("T'ŭkgŭpsi"; tŭkpyŏlsi; 특별시; 特別市) in 2010, and made a part of South P'yŏngan. Namp'o is approximately 50 km southwest of P'yŏngyang, at the mouth of the Taedong River.

Contents

Namp'o was originally a small fishing village that became a port for foreign trade in 1897, developing into a modern port in 1945 after World War II. With the rapid increase in state investment, the city's industrial capacity grew. Some of the city's industrial facilities include the city's Smelter Complex, Glass Corporation, Shipbuilding Complex, Fishery Complex, and other central and local factories. Namp'o is a center for the DPRK shipbuilding industry. North of the city are facilities for freight transportation, aquatic products, and fishery, and a sea salt factory. Apples grown in the city's Ryonggang district (룡강군) are a famous local product. [4]

Administrative divisions

Namp'o is divided into 5 kuyŏk and 2 kun, which are in turn subdivided into tong and ri:

Climate

Climate data for Nampo (1981–2010)
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Average high °C (°F)−1.3
(29.7)
2.0
(35.6)
8.1
(46.6)
16.1
(61.0)
21.8
(71.2)
25.9
(78.6)
27.9
(82.2)
28.7
(83.7)
24.9
(76.8)
18.6
(65.5)
9.5
(49.1)
2.1
(35.8)
15.4
(59.7)
Daily mean °C (°F)−5.0
(23.0)
−2.2
(28.0)
3.3
(37.9)
10.5
(50.9)
16.3
(61.3)
20.9
(69.6)
23.9
(75.0)
24.5
(76.1)
20.0
(68.0)
13.4
(56.1)
5.3
(41.5)
−1.6
(29.1)
10.8
(51.4)
Average low °C (°F)−8.6
(16.5)
−5.7
(21.7)
−0.4
(31.3)
6.2
(43.2)
12.0
(53.6)
17.3
(63.1)
21.1
(70.0)
21.4
(70.5)
16.2
(61.2)
9.3
(48.7)
1.7
(35.1)
−4.7
(23.5)
7.2
(45.0)
Average precipitation mm (inches)10.2
(0.40)
9.8
(0.39)
22.4
(0.88)
35.2
(1.39)
69.5
(2.74)
73.6
(2.90)
201.1
(7.92)
176.1
(6.93)
78.9
(3.11)
38.6
(1.52)
36.9
(1.45)
18.8
(0.74)
771.1
(30.36)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.1 mm)4.63.54.44.96.67.211.69.16.05.57.05.475.8
Average snowy days6.03.92.10.10.00.00.00.00.00.12.35.620.1
Average relative humidity (%)71.369.568.466.171.077.585.884.676.772.272.671.774.0
Source: Korea Meteorological Administration [6]

Transportation

The 'Youth Hero Motorway' connecting Pyongyang to Namp'o. Hero Youth Highway in DPRK.jpg
The 'Youth Hero Motorway' connecting Pyongyang to Namp'o.

Road

The Youth Hero Motorway connects Namp'o to P'yŏngyang.

Air

Onch'ŏn Airport in Onch'ŏn-gun serves Namp'o Special City; Air Koryo operates charter flights from here.

Rail

The greater Namp'o area is densely served by the Korean State Railway, with 18 stations on the P'yŏngnam Line, the entirety of the Ryonggang Sŏhaekammun and Taean lines, and one station on the Ŭllyul Line being located inside the boundaries of Namp'o-t'ŭkpyŏlsi.

Sea

The bulk carrier Bai Mei 8 loading coal at Nampo, North Korea on July 6, 2017. Bai Mei 8 Nampo 6Jul2017 SkySat.jpg
The bulk carrier Bai Mei 8 loading coal at Nampo, North Korea on July 6, 2017.

The West Sea Barrage of the port of Namp'o, built by erecting an 8-km long sea wall, has three lock chambers which allow the passage of ships up to 50,000 tons, and 36 sluices. Namp'o Harbour is often used as the primary port of call for receiving foreign food aid assistance into North Korea. The port of Namp'o has modern harbour facilities that can accommodate ships of 20,000 tonnes but is frozen during the winter. Namp'o serves as Pyongyang's port on the Yellow Sea. [7]

In 2008, the harbour received several batches of grain delivery; the first batch delivered in June was sent by the United States and weighed 38,000 tons. A South Korean-based relief organisation, Join Together Society, donated one batch of flour in October of the same year weighing approximately 500 tons. [8]

Education

Institutes of higher learning in Namp'o include

Notable people from Nampo

Sister cities

See also

Related Research Articles

Transport in North Korea is constrained by economic problems and government restrictions. Public transport predominates, and most of it is electrified.

South Pyongan Province Province of North Korea

South Pyongan Province is a province of North Korea. The province was formed in 1896 from the southern half of the former Pyongan Province, remained a province of Korea until 1945, then became a province of North Korea. Its capital is Pyongsong.

Taedong River

The Taedong River is a large river in North Korea. It rises in the Rangrim Mountains of the country's north. It then flows southwest into Korea Bay at Namp'o. In between, it runs through the country's capital, Pyongyang. Along the river are landmarks such as the Juche Tower and Kim Il-sung Square.

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Pyongui Line

The P'yŏngŭi Line is an electrified main trunk line of the Korean State Railway of North Korea, running from P'yŏngyang to Sinŭiju on the border with China. It is the main corridor for overland traffic between North Korea and China, and is one of the country's most important rail lines. A bridge over the Yalu River connects Sinŭiju to the Chinese city of Dandong and the Shendan Line of the China Railway to Shenyang and Chinese points beyond.

Chollima-guyok Wards in South Pyŏngan, North Korea

Ch'ŏllima is a kuyŏk in Namp'o Special City, North Korea. Prior to 2004, it was Ch'ŏllima-kuyok, a district of northeastern Namp'o Directly Governed City. Following the demotion of Namp'o in 2004, Ch'ŏllima became an independent county. The region was part of Kangsŏ county in 1952, and was entered into Taean city; when Taean was demoted to county in 1983, it became part of Namp'o Special City.

Kangdong County, is one of Pyongyang's two suburban counties. In 1983 it was separated from South P'yongan Province and assumed direct governance by the Pyongyang City People's Committee. It is bordered by Sŏngch'ŏn-gun, South P'yongan in the north and east, Sŭngho-guyŏk from the south and the Taedong River from the west.

Pyongchon-guyok Guyŏk of Pyongyang in Pyŏngyang-Chikhalsi, North Korea

P'yŏngch'ŏn-guyŏk is one of the 18 guyŏk of P'yŏngyang, North Korea. It is bordered by the Taedong River in the south and the Potong River in the north and west, and to the east by Chung-guyŏk, from which it is separated by the yard area of P'yŏngyang railway station. It was established as a guyŏk in October 1960 by the P'yŏngyang City People's Committee through a mandate of the Central Committee of the Workers' Party of Korea.

Pyongyang station

Pyongyang station is the central railway station of P'yŏngyang, North Korea. It is located in Yŏkchŏn-dong, Chung-guyŏk.

Onchon County County in South Pyŏngan, North Korea

Onch'ŏn County is a county in South P'yŏngan province, North Korea. It is administered as part of Namp'o Special City.

Pyongnam Line

The P'yŏngnam Line is an electrified standard-gauge trunk line of the Korean State Railway in North Korea, linking P'yŏngyang with the port city of Namp'o and the hot springs at P'yŏngnam Onch'ŏn. The length of the line is 89.9 km (55.9 mi).

Kangsŏ station is a railway station in Kiyang-dong, Kangsŏ-guyŏk, Namp'o Special City, North Korea, on the P'yŏngnam Line of the Korean State Railway. It is the starting point of the Taean Line and of the Posan Line.

Pyongdok Line

The P'yŏngdŏk Line is an electrified standard-gauge trunk line of the Korean State Railway in North Korea running from Taedonggang Station in P'yŏngyang, where it connects to the P'yŏngbu, P'yŏngnam, P'yŏngra and P'yŏngŭi Lines, to Kujang, where it connects to the Manp'o and Ch'ŏngnyŏn P'arwŏn Lines. The total length of the line is 192.3 km (119.5 mi).

P'yongyang Choch'ajang is a marshalling yard in Chŏngp'yŏng-dong, P'yŏngch'ŏn-guyŏk, P'yŏngyang, North Korea, on the P'yŏngyanghwajŏn Line of the Korean State Railway, it is the starting point of a branch to the P'yŏngyang Thermal Power Plant.

Namp'o station is a railway station in Hanggu-guyŏk, Namp'o Special City, North Korea on the P'yŏngnam Line of the Korean State Railway, as well as the starting point of the Tojiri Line. There is an engine house northwest of the station in Munhwa-dong, Hanggu-guyŏk.

Tŏktong station is a railway station in Taedae-dong, Waudo-guyŏk, Namp'o Special City, North Korea on the P'yŏngnam Line of the Korean State Railway.

Sillyŏngri station is a railway station in Sillyŏng-ri, Waudo-guyŏk, Namp'o Special City, North Korea on the P'yŏngnam Line of the Korean State Railway; it is also the northern end of the Sŏhae Kammun Line.

P'yŏngnam Onch'ŏn station is a railway station in Onch'ŏn-ŭp, Onch'ŏn county, Namp'o Special City, North Korea, the northern terminus of the P'yŏngnam Line of the Korean State Railway; it was also the southern terminus of the now-closed Namdong Line.

Statistics of DPR Korea Football League in the 2016 season.

Statistics of DPR Korea Football League in the 2015 season.

References

  1. . Pyongyang: Rodong Sinmun. August 2020 http://rodong.rep.kp/en/index.php?strPageID=SF01_02_01&newsID=2020-08-14-0006 . Retrieved 17 October 2018.Missing or empty |title= (help)
  2. "Organizational Chart of North Korean Leadership" (PDF). Seoul: Political and Military Analysis Division, Intelligence and Analysis Bureau; Ministry of Unification. January 2018. Retrieved 17 October 2018.
  3. DPR Korean Central Bureau of Statistics: 2008 Population Census (2008 population census, published in 2009)
  4. "North Korea". Britannica.com. Retrieved 14 December 2017.
  5. Kim So Yeol (15 February 2011). "North Korea Splits No. 38 and 39 Departments Up Again". Daily NK. Retrieved 15 November 2012.
  6. "30 years report of Meteorological Observations in North Korea" (in Korean). Korea Meteorological Administration. pp. 232–281. Archived from the original on 21 December 2020. Retrieved 25 December 2020.
  7. Seoul, Yonhap News Agency (27 December 2002). North Korea Handbook. M.E. Sharpe. ISBN   9780765635235 . Retrieved 15 December 2017 via Google Books.
  8. KINU White paper on human rights in North Korea, 2009 (Chapter G. Human Rights Violations Inside Political Concentration Camps (Kwanliso), p. 125)
  9. Перспективные направления сотрудничества [Prospective areas of cooperation] (in Russian). Committee for External Relations of Saint-Petersburg. Retrieved 22 October 2017.
  10. "Sister cities between DPRK and Mexico". KCNA. 27 July 2003. Archived from the original on 8 September 2017. Retrieved 3 December 2017.
  11. "Friendly Ties Opened between DPRK and Ecuadorian Cities". KCNA. 10 August 2005. Archived from the original on 8 September 2017. Retrieved 3 December 2017.

Further reading