Napoleonland

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Napoleonland was the nickname given by news media to a French theme park, "Napoleon's Bivouac", [1] proposed by French politician Yves Jégo in 2012. [2] The park's theme was to be Napoleon Bonaparte, the French general and emperor who rose to power in the aftermath of the French Revolution. Proposed attractions included lessons in Napoleon's life from his time as an artillery officer to his eventual defeat at the Battle of Waterloo. A watershow would depict the Battle of Trafalgar, other historical re-enactments and a ski run featuring replicated frozen bodies of French soldiers in a recreation of Napoleon's retreat from Russia. The park would be built by 2017 near Montereau-Fault-Yonne, site of the Battle of Montereau, where proposer Jégo was the local mayor, at an estimated cost of 200 million euros. [3] As of September 2013, there was no report of any funding or other significant progress on the proposal.

News media elements of the mass media that focus on delivering news

The news media or news industry are forms of mass media that focus on delivering news to the general public or a target public. These include print media, broadcast news, and more recently the Internet.

France Republic with mainland in Europe and numerous oversea territories

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Amusement park park with rides and attractions

An amusement park is a park that features various attractions, such as rides and games, as well as other events for entertainment purposes. A theme park is a type of amusement park that bases its structures and attractions around a central theme, often featuring multiple areas with different themes. Unlike temporary and mobile funfairs and carnivals, amusement parks are stationary and built for long-lasting operation. They are more elaborate than city parks and playgrounds, usually providing attractions that cater to a variety of age groups. While amusement parks often contain themed areas, theme parks place a heavier focus with more intricately-designed themes that revolve around a particular subject or group of subjects.

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References

  1. Schofield, Hugh (26 March 2012). "Napoleon... the theme park". BBC News.
  2. Grossman, Samantha (24 January 2012). "French Theme Park 'Napoleonland' in the Works". Time Magazine .
  3. Laurent, Ottavi (8 February 2012). "A New Napoleonic Campaign for Montereau". Foundation Napoleon. Archived from the original on 29 September 2013.

http://www.literarytraveler.net/blog/category/summer-fun-2/ http://artjuice.net/lattraction-napoleon-m-monde/ https://www.dimensionparcs.fr/france/parc-napoleon-toujours-projet/ http://www.ville-montereau77.fr/news/le-futur-parc-napoleon-se-devoile/

<i>Daily Mail</i> British daily middle-market tabloid newspaper published in London

The Daily Mail is a British daily middle-market newspaper published in London in a tabloid format. Founded in 1896, it is the United Kingdom's second-biggest-selling daily newspaper after The Sun. Its sister paper The Mail on Sunday was launched in 1982, while Scottish and Irish editions of the daily paper were launched in 1947 and 2006 respectively. Content from the paper appears on the MailOnline website, although the website is managed separately and has its own editor.

<i>The Guardian</i> British national daily newspaper

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