Nat Peck

Last updated
Nat Peck
Born(1925-01-13)January 13, 1925
New York City, New York, US
DiedOctober 24, 2015(2015-10-24) (aged 90)
London, UK
Genres Jazz
InstrumentsTrombone
Years active1943–1990s
Associated acts Glenn Miller, Don Redman, Coleman Hawkins, James Moody, Roy Eldridge, Don Byas, Kenny Clarke, Dizzy Gillespie, Michel Legrand, André Hodeir, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Peter Herbolzheimer

Nathan Peck (January 13, 1925 – October 24, 2015) was an American jazz trombonist.

Contents

Early life

Peck was born in New York City on January 13, 1925. [1] His father was a cinema projectionist. [1] Peck began playing the trombone as a teenager. [1]

Later life and career

After leaving high school Peck was drafted into the army and became part of Glenn Miller's band. [1] He remained with the band until after World War II ended. [1] He played with Don Redman in 1947. [2] He studied classical music at the Paris Conservatory from 1949 to 1951, [1] while playing and recording with leading jazz musicians such as Coleman Hawkins (1949), James Moody (1949–50), and Roy Eldridge (1950). [2] In the 1950s Peck played on television in New York, and in 1953 he recorded with Dizzy Gillespie. [2] Peck shuttled between Paris and New York until 1957, when he married dancer Vera Tietz and settled in France. [1]

In France, Peck played with Michel Legrand, André Hodeir and Duke Ellington. [2] Peck spent some time in England and Germany, working as a staff musician at Sender Freies Berlin and playing with Quincy Jones and the Clarke-Boland Big Band (196369). [2] He relocated to London in 1965, where he became active in the studios, film, and television. [1] He played with Benny Goodman in 197072 and with Peter Herbolzheimer in 1979. [2]

Latterly, Peck worked mainly as a contractor in the entertainment business, which led to him ending his playing career. [1] He died on October 24, 2015. [1]

Discography

With the Kenny Clarke/Francy Boland Big Band

With Dizzy Gillespie

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Nat Peck, jazz trombonist - obituary
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Peck, Nat", Oxford Music Online, Grove Music Online. Oxford Music Online. Oxford University Press, 2003, doi:10.1093/gmo/9781561592630.article.J349400