National Broadcasting Services of Thailand

Last updated

National Broadcasting Services of Thailand
NBT Logo.png
CountryThailand
NetworkNational Broadcasting Services of Thailand (NBT)
Headquarters Din Daeng, Bangkok, Thailand
Programming
Picture format 1080i HDTV
Ownership
OwnerPublic Relations Department of the Office of the Prime Minister
Sister channelsNBT Digital 2 HD
NBT Regional TV (DTT Channel 11)
NBT World
History
LaunchedRadio Thailand Established:
25 February 1930;92 years ago (1930-02-25) [1]
Public Relations Department Established:
3 May 1933;89 years ago (1933-05-03) [2]
NBT TV First broadcast:
1 October 1985;36 years ago (1985-10-01)
NBT TV Established:
11 July 1988;33 years ago (1988-07-11)
Former namesTVT11 (1985-2008)
Links
Website nbt2hd.prd.go.th (Thai)
Availability
Terrestrial
Digital Channel 2 (HD) (PRD - MUX1)

National Broadcasting Services of Thailand (Thai : สถานีวิทยุโทรทัศน์แห่งประเทศไทย) (NBT) is the broadcasting arm of the Government Public Relations Department (PRD), a division of the Thai Government. It operates comprehensive media services comprising radio, television networks (terrestrial and satellite), online services and social media. [3]

Contents

Terrestrial stations

Radio stations

Radio Thailand is the radio division of NBT. It was established on 25 February 1930 and currently comprises 5 AM, 6 FM radio stations and World Service, a foreign language international shortwave radio station.

Television Channels

NBT TV

NBT TV (or NBT (Digital) 2 HD), formerly TVT11, is the television division and free-to-air channel of NBT.

The broadcasting of TVT11 began on 11 July 1988, when TV9 (currently known as Modernine TV) split into two channels. It was firstly aimed at viewers in the countryside. Some elements such as sex and violence are censored as NBT is one of the government departments under direct control.

NBTTV is also available over the TrueVisions direct broadcast satellite platform on channel 5. Presently, it is broadcasting on channel 2.

On 1 April 2008, the television channel began to broadcast 24 hours a day, offering more programs for viewers who stay up late to watch television [4]

On 1 April 2008, TVT11 television stations were once again restructured by Dr. Mun Pattanothai, the then Information Minister and renamed NBTTV.

Educational television programs were aired through this channel from 1988 to 1999, alternate with TV9 in the afternoon until 1994 where it airs in the morning. Daytime programming on TV9 started on 1 March 1994 has caused ETV to be broadcast only on TV11.

NBTTV and the radio stations under National Broadcasting Services of Thailand broadcasts from their headquarters in Din Daeng, Bangkok.

During the analog era, it broadcasts on VHF band III, although some parts of Thailand it transmits the signal in UHF where it is normally tuned to band 2. In the Bangkok Metropolitan Area the VHF channel for TV11 is 11, with a weaker transmission on channel 10 in certain parts of the Bangkok Metropolitan Area. It is also available over the NBTi DVB-T test transmission over a frequency of 658 MHz, SID 2. As of 1 January 2007, it is also available over a test DMB-T/H transmission on Band III.

NBT Regional channels

Four regions of Thailand (North, Northeast, Central and South) have their own variant of the regional channel and broadcasts on DTT channel 11.

NBT World

NBT World, launched in 2013, is the network's 24/7 English language television service aimed for Thai, ASEAN and Asian communities broadcast Internationally via cable and satellite. However NBT World is owned by National News Bureau of Thailand which is a unit under The Government Public Relations Department

See also

Related Research Articles

Modern telecommunications in Thailand began in 1875 with the deployment of the first telegraph service. Historically, the development of telecommunication networks in Thailand were in the hands of the public sector. Government organisations were established to provide telegraph, telephone, radio, and television services, and other government agencies, especially the military, still control a large estate of radio and television spectra. Private telecommunication operators initially acquired concession agreements with state enterprises. For mobile phone services, all the concessions have been amended by successive government to last 25 years have gradually ended in 2015. For other services, the concession terms and conditions vary, ranging from one to fifteen years. Nearly all of the concessions are build-operate-transfer (BTO) contracts. The private investor has to build all the required facilities and transfer them to the state before they can operate or offer services to public.

Digital Video Broadcasting Open standard for digital television broadcasting

Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB) is a set of international open standards for digital television. DVB standards are maintained by the DVB Project, an international industry consortium, and are published by a Joint Technical Committee (JTC) of the European Telecommunications Standardisé Institute (ETSI), European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization (CENELEC) and European Broadcasting Union (EBU).

Ultra high frequency Electromagnetic spectrum 300–3000 MHz

Ultra high frequency (UHF) is the ITU designation for radio frequencies in the range between 300 megahertz (MHz) and 3 gigahertz (GHz), also known as the decimetre band as the wavelengths range from one meter to one tenth of a meter. Radio waves with frequencies above the UHF band fall into the super-high frequency (SHF) or microwave frequency range. Lower frequency signals fall into the VHF or lower bands. UHF radio waves propagate mainly by line of sight; they are blocked by hills and large buildings although the transmission through building walls is strong enough for indoor reception. They are used for television broadcasting, cell phones, satellite communication including GPS, personal radio services including Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, walkie-talkies, cordless phones, satellite phones, and numerous other applications.

Terrestrial television Television content transmitted via signals in the air

Terrestrial television is a type of television broadcasting in which the television signal is transmitted by radio waves from the terrestrial (Earth-based) transmitter of a television station to a TV receiver having an antenna. The term terrestrial is more common in Europe and Latin America, while in Canada and the United States it is called broadcast or over-the-air television (OTA). The term "terrestrial" is used to distinguish this type from the newer technologies of satellite television, in which the television signal is transmitted to the receiver from an overhead satellite; cable television, in which the signal is carried to the receiver through a cable; and Internet Protocol television, in which the signal is received over an Internet stream or on a network utilizing the Internet Protocol. Terrestrial television stations broadcast on television channels with frequencies between about 52 and 600 MHz in the VHF and UHF bands. Since radio waves in these bands travel by line of sight, reception is generally limited by the visual horizon to distances of 64–97 kilometres (40–60 mi), although under better conditions and with tropospheric ducting, signals can sometimes be received hundreds of kilometers distant.

Digital radio is the use of digital technology to transmit or receive across the radio spectrum. Digital transmission by radio waves includes digital broadcasting, and especially digital audio radio services.

Digital terrestrial television is a technology for terrestrial television in which land-based (terrestrial) television stations broadcast television content by radio waves to televisions in consumers' residences in a digital format. DTTV is a major technological advance over the previous analog television, and has largely replaced analog which had been in common use since the middle of the 20th century. Test broadcasts began in 1998 with the changeover to DTTV beginning in 2006 and is now complete in many countries. The advantages of digital terrestrial television are similar to those obtained by digitising platforms such as cable TV, satellite, and telecommunications: more efficient use of limited radio spectrum bandwidth, provision of more television channels than analog, better quality images, and potentially lower operating costs for broadcasters.

Free-to-air (FTA) services are television (TV) and radio services broadcast in unencrypted form, allowing any person with the appropriate receiving equipment to receive the signal and view or listen to the content without requiring a subscription, other ongoing cost, or one-off fee. In the traditional sense, this is carried on terrestrial radio signals and received with an antenna.

A television station is a set of equipment managed by a business, organisation or other entity, such as an amateur television (ATV) operator, that transmits video content and audio content via radio waves directly from a transmitter on the earth's surface to any number of tuned receivers simultaneously.

Independent Television Network Sri Lankan state-owned broadcaster

The Independent Television Network Ltd also known as ITN Ltd or simply as ITN is a Sri Lankan state governed television and radio broadcaster located in Wickramasinghepura, Battaramulla, Sri Lanka. It is a Shrama Abhimani Award winner , broadcasts content to a wide demographic within Sri Lanka as well as the expatriate community. The programmes are broadcast in three languages: Sinhala, Tamil, and English. The ITN broadcast coverage extends to 99% of the island of Sri Lanka.

MCOT Thai state-owned public broadcaster

MCOT Public Company Limited, formerly known as the Mass Communication Organization of Thailand, is a Thai state-owned public broadcaster. It owns and operates a number of radio and television stations in Thailand. It is based in Bangkok. At present, MCOT runs seven national, one international, 52 provincial, one district radio station, two television channels, and 2 satellite television channels.(until 2017) Their motto is "Always Serving the Public". On their website MCOT uses the slogan "Digitally beyond".

Television in Iceland is currently composed of the public broadcasting service of RÚV, five free-to-view channels and a number of subscription channels provided by private broadcasters. Broadcasts began in 1955 when the American Forces Radio and Television Service (AFRTS) started an English-language television service broadcasting from Naval Air Station Keflavik, which operated until 2006. The first Icelandic-language television broadcasts started in September 1966 with the launch of RÚV, originally called Sjónvarpið. In 1986 the first privately owned TV station, Stöð 2, began broadcasts. In recent years the emergence of foreign internet streaming services such as Netflix and Disney+ has seen shift from domestic providers provide similar on demand streaming services such as Síminn Premium and Stöð 2+.

Thai Public Broadcasting Service Thai public service broadcaster

The Thai Public Broadcasting Service, or TPBS, is a public broadcasting service in Thailand. It was established by the Thai Public Broadcasting Service Act, BE 2551 (2008), which came into force on 15 January 2008. Under this act, TPBS holds the status of state agency with legal personality, but is not a government agency or state enterprise.

Digital television transition Global switchover to digital television

The digital television transition, also called the digital switchover (DSO), the analogue switch/sign-off (ASO), the digital migration, or the analogue shutdown, is the process in which older analogue television broadcasting technology is converted to and replaced by digital television. Conducted by individual nations on different schedules, this primarily involves the conversion of analogue terrestrial television broadcasting infrastructure to digital terrestrial (DTT), a major benefit being extra frequencies on the radio spectrum and lower broadcasting costs, as well as improved viewing qualities for consumers.

In Thailand, television broadcasting started on 24 June, 1955. Color telecasts were started in 1967, and full-time color transmissions were launched in 1975. As of November 2020, there are currently 21 digital (DVB-T2) TV channels in Thailand.

Channel 3 (Thailand)

Channel 3 or Channel 3 HD is a Thai free-to-air television network that was launched on 26 March 1970 as Thailand's first commercial television station. Channel 3 is operated by BEC Multimedia Company Limited (“BECM”), a subsidiary of publicly traded company BEC World Public Company Limited. The network is headquartered in the Maleenond Towers of Bangkok.

Digital multimedia broadcasting South Korean digital TV standard

Digital multimedia broadcasting (DMB) is a digital radio transmission technology developed in South Korea as part of the national IT project for sending multimedia such as TV, radio and datacasting to mobile devices such as mobile phones, laptops and GPS navigation systems. This technology, sometimes known as mobile TV, should not be confused with Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB) which was developed as a research project for the European Union.

This article refers to sports broadcasting contracts in Thailand. For a list of rights in other countries, see Sports television broadcast contracts.

References

  1. "Radio Thailand marks its 88th anniversary". Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union.
  2. "PRD Celebrates Its 88th Anniversary on 3 May 2021". The Government Public Relations Department. 30 April 2021.
  3. "National Broadcasting Services of Thailand (NBT) on Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union (ABU) website".
  4. https://www.parliament.go.th/ewtadmin/ewt/parliament_parcy/download/usergroup_disaster/9-13.pdf [ bare URL PDF ]