National Council of Iran

Last updated
National Council of Iran
Spokesperson Reza Pahlavi [1]
Founder Reza Pahlavi [2]
FoundedApril 2013;6 years ago (2013-04) [3]
Headquarters Paris, France [4]
Ideology Constitutional monarchy [1]
Secularism [4]
Party flag
New Lion and Sun Flag of Iran 2.jpg
Website
irannc.org

The National Council of Iran (NCI; Persian : شورای ملی ایران, romanized: Šurā-ye melli-e Īrān), officially the National Council of Iran for Free Elections, [5] is a loosely based umbrella group of the exiled opposition to Iran's Islamic Republic government. [2] It serves as Reza Pahlavi's government in exile in order to either reclaim the former throne [1] or as the new president of Iran [6] after overthrowing the current government.

Persian language Western Iranian language

Persian, also known by its endonym Farsi, is a Western Iranian language within the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family. It is a pluricentric language primarily spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and some other regions which historically were Persianate societies and considered part of Greater Iran. It is written right to left in the Persian alphabet, a modified variant of the Arabic script.

Romanization of Persian or Latinization of Persian is the representation of the Persian language with the Latin script. Several different romanization schemes exist, each with its own set of rules driven by its own set of ideological goals.

The Iranian dissidents are composed of scattered groups that reject the current government and instead seek the establishment of democratic institutions.

The "self-styled" [6] National Council claims to have gathered "tens of thousands of pro-democracy proponents from both inside and outside Iran." [4] It also claims to represent religious and ethnic minorities. [7] According to Kenneth Katzman, the group which was established with over 30 groups has "suffered defections and its activity level appears minimal". [3]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Parker Richards (29 January 2016). "Pahlavi, Elie Wiesel, Rev. King to Be Honored for Promoting Peace". Observer . Retrieved 1 June 2017.
  2. 1 2 Olivia Ward (1 June 2013). "Reza Pahlavi, son of Shah, heads pro-democracy group to end Iran's Islamic regime". Toronto Star. Retrieved 18 June 2017.
  3. 1 2 Kenneth Katzman (2 June 2017), Iran: Politics, Human Rights, and U.S. Policy (PDF), Federation of American Scientists, p. 27, retrieved 16 June 2017
  4. 1 2 3 Elaine Ganley (2 May 2013). "AP Interview: New job for son of toppled shah". Associated Press. Retrieved 1 June 2017 via Yahoo.
  5. Reza Pahlavi (11 November 2016). "An Open Letter From The President Of The Iran National Council To The President-Elect". Huffington Post. Retrieved 1 June 2017.
  6. 1 2 Maciej Milczanowski (2014), "US Policy towards Iran under President Barack Obama's Administration" (PDF), Hemispheres: Studies on Cultures and Societies, Institute of Mediterranean and Oriental Cultures Polish Academy of Sciences, 29 (4): 53–66, ISSN   0239-8818
  7. Sonia Verma (6 June 2014). "Shah's son seeks support for people's revolution against Iran". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 17 June 2017.