National Film Award for Best Supporting Actor

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National Film Award for Best Supporting Actor
National award for contributions to Indian cinema
Vijay Sethupathi at Dharmadurai Audio launch.jpg
The 2019 recipient Vijay Sethupathi
Awarded forBest Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role
Sponsored by Directorate of Film Festivals
Reward(s)
  • Rajat Kamal (Silver Lotus)
  • 50,000 (US$700)
First awarded1984
Last awarded2019
Most recent winner Vijay Sethupathi
Highlights
Most awards Nana Patekar, Pankaj Kapur and Atul Kulkarni
(2 times)
Total awarded36
First winner Victor Banerjee
Website https://dff.gov.in/Archive.aspx?ID=6   OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg

The National Film Award for Best Supporting Actor, officially known as the Rajat Kamal Award for the Best Supporting Actor (Hindi pronunciation:  [rədʒət̪ kəməl] ), is an honour presented annually at India's National Film Awards ceremony by the Directorate of Film Festivals (DFF), an organisation set up by the Indian Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. [1] A national panel appointed annually by the DFF selects the actor who has given the best performance in a supporting role within Indian cinema. [1] The award is presented by the President of India at a ceremony held in New Delhi. [2]

Contents

The winner is given a "Rajat Kamal" (Silver Lotus) certificate and a cash prize of 50,000 (US$700). [lower-alpha 1] Including ties and repeat winners, the government of India has presented a total of 32 Best Supporting Actor awards to 29 different actors. Although Indian cinema produces films in more than 20 languages, [4] the actors whose performances have won awards have worked in one or more of seven major languages: Hindi (17 awards), Tamil (9 awards), Bengali (3 awards), Malayalam (3 awards), Marathi (3 awards), Telugu (1 award), Kannada (1 award).

The first recipient was Victor Banerjee, who was honoured at the 32nd National Film Awards for his performance in the Bengali film Ghare Baire (1984). [5] As of the 2013 awards, three actors—Nana Patekar, Pankaj Kapur, and Atul Kulkarni—have been honoured twice. Patekar was awarded for the Hindi films Parinda (1989) [lower-alpha 2] and Agni Sakshi (1996). [6] Kapur received the awards for his work in the Hindi films Raakh (1988) and Maqbool (2003). [7] Kulkarni was awarded for his performances in the Tamil / Hindi film Hey Ram (1999) and the Hindi film Chandni Bar (2001). [8] Paresh Rawal and Dilip Prabhavalkar have each won the award for two performances in a single year. Rawal received the award for his starring roles in the Hindi films Woh Chokri (1993) and Sir (1993) at the 41st National Film Awards, while Prabhavalkar won at the 54th National Film Awards for his performances in the Hindi film Lage Raho Munna Bhai (2006) and the Marathi film Shevri (2006). [9] At the 42nd National Film Awards, the award was tied between Ashish Vidyarthi and Nagesh, winning for their roles in the Hindi film Drohkaal (1994) and the Tamil film Nammavar (1994), respectively. [10] The most recent recipient of the award is Vijay Sethupathi, who will be honoured at the 67th National Film Awards ceremony for his performance in the Tamil film Super Deluxe (2019).

List of recipients

Nana Patekar snapped at the press meet for movie on Baba Amte 06.jpg
Pankaj Kapur.jpg
Atul Kulkarni graces the screening of Sonata.jpg
Nana Patekar (top), Pankaj Kapur (middle), and Atul Kulkarni (bottom) are the three actors to win the honour twice.
Aashish Vidyarthi.jpg
Nagesh2005.jpg
Ashish Vidyarthi (top) and Nagesh (bottom) tied the award in 1994 for their roles in Drohkaal and Nammavar respectively.
Paresh Raval.jpg
Dilip Prabhavalkar.jpg
Paresh Rawal (top) and Dilip Prabhavalkar (bottom) are the two actors who won the award for different films in a single year for different award ceremonies. Rawal was awarded in 1993 & Prabhavalkar in 2006.
Key
SymbolMeaning
Dagger-14-plain.pngIndicates a joint award for that year
Double-dagger-14-plain.pngIndicates that the winner won the award for two performances in that year
List of award recipients, showing the year, role(s), film(s) and language(s)
Year [lower-alpha 2] Recipient(s)Role(s)Film(s)Language(s)CitationRef. [lower-alpha 3]
1984
(32nd)
Victor Banerjee Nikhilesh Choudhury Ghare Baire Bengali   [11]
1985
(33rd)
Dipankar De Husband Parama Bengali
For a convincing portrayal of anguish of a husband who is unable to accept his wife.
[12]
1986
(34th)
Suresh Oberoi Mukhi Mirch Masala Hindi
For breathing life into complex feaudal character, who tries to control a destiny beyond his reach.
[13]
1987
(35th)
Thilakan Neduvancheril Achunni Nair (Mooppil Nair) Rithubhedam Malayalam
For his sharp and incisive delineation of the immorality of a human being who is weak and mean.
[14]
1988
(36th)
Pankaj Kapur Inspector P. K. Raakh Hindi   [15]
1989
(37th)
Nana Patekar Anna Set Parinda Hindi
For his unique portrayal of a psychotic character.
[16]
1990
(38th)
Nedumudi Venu Maharaja Udayavarma Thampuran His Highness Abdullah Malayalam
For maintaining the character with consistency and sensitivity.
[17]
1991
(39th)
P. L. Narayana Appala Nayudu Yagnam Telugu
For convincing portrayal of the oppressed farmer.
[18]
1992
(40th)
Sunny Deol Govind Srivatsav Damini – Lightning Hindi
For his outstanding portrayal of hardened and cynical lawyer who takes on new challenges in his quest for justice.
[19]
1993
(41st)
Double-dagger-14-plain.png
Paresh Rawal  Lalitram Mohan Roy
  Velji
  Woh Chokri
  Sir
Hindi
For his performances in the films to reveal contradictory human emotions at the outer and inner levels.
[20]
1994
(42nd)
Dagger-14-plain.png
Ashish Vidyarthi Commander Bhadra Drohkaal Hindi
For bringing credibility to his role with strength and total conviction.
[21]
Nagesh Prabhakar Rao Nammavar Tamil
For making heart break of a broken father come alive with dignity and poise.
1995
(43rd)
Mithun Chakraborty Ramakrishna Swami Vivekananda Hindi
For his brilliant and soul searching portrayal of Shree Ramakrishna Paramahamsa and succeeds in elevating the character to a spiritual level.
[22]
1996
(44th)
Nana Patekar Vishwanath Agni Sakshi Hindi
For his brilliant performance as an obsessed husband.
[23]
1997
(45th)
Prakash Raj Tamizhselvan Iruvar Tamil
For his sensitive and consistent portrayal of a powerful character that spans a colourful political career.
[24]
1998
(46th)
Manoj Bajpai Bhiku Mhatre Satya Hindi
For his flawless performance of the eccentric underworld figure trapped in a system, cold blooded yet vulnerable at the same time.
[25]
1999
(47th)
Atul Kulkarni Shriram Abhyankar Hey Ram Tamil
For his serious performance as a cold blooded fundamentalist stalking the cities during the turbulent years of partition that led to the assassination of Mahatma Gandhi.
[26]
2000
(48th)
H. G. Dattatreya Hasanabba Munnudi Kannada
For his portrayal of Hasanabba. He is an agent who procures local girls for arabs to marry in an impoverished village in Karnataka. H. G. Dattatreya brings a wonderful sensitivity to the character, without turning it into a stereotypical villain.
[27]
2001
(49th)
Atul Kulkarni Pothya Sawant Chandni Bar Hindi
For depicting a ruthless character, trapped in a world without social values.
[28]
2002
(50th)
Chandrasekhar Lawrence [lower-alpha 4] Nanba Nanba Tamil
For his touching and absorbing portrayal of a physically challenged man.
[30]
2003
(51st)
Pankaj Kapur Jahangir Khan (Abbaji) Maqbool Hindi
For his riveting yet understated performance as a mafia don.
[31]
2004
(52nd)
Haradhan Bandopadhyay Haradhan Bandopadhyay Krantikaal Bengali
For his subtle yet powerful performance which is understated portraying a helpless bedridden old royal.
[32]
2005
(53rd)
Naseeruddin Shah Mohit Iqbal Hindi
For his competent depiction of an endearing man who finds it difficult to give up his addiction to alcohol but still emerges vicarious as his protégé the young village lad conquers his dream.
[3]
2006
(54th)
Double-dagger-14-plain.png
Dilip Prabhavalkar   Mahatma Gandhi [lower-alpha 5]
  Clerk
  Lage Raho Munna Bhai
  Shevri
  Hindi
  Marathi
For the sincere portrayal of a wide range of emotions of two divergent and equally challenging characters of Gandhi in Lage Raho Munna Bhai and a benign middle-class clerk in Shevri.
[34]
2007
(55th)
Darshan Jariwala Mahatma Gandhi Gandhi, My Father Hindi
For truthfully portraying the angst of a great historical figure – Mahatma Gandhi. The Father of the Nation stands defeated in his personal relationship with his own son.
[35]
2008
(56th)
Arjun Rampal Joseph Mascarenhas (Joe) Rock On!! Hindi
For his moving performance as a musician trying to rise above personal tragedy.
[36]
2009
(57th)
Farooq Sheikh S. K. Rao Lahore Hindi
For the consummate ease with which he persuades and inspires everyone around him while retaining his integrity and dignity.
[37]
2010
(58th)
Thambi Ramaiah Ramaiah Mynaa Tamil
For a heart-warming performance as a policeman who discovers the finer side of his own humanity in the process of capturing a fugitive.
[38]
2011
(59th)
Appukutty Azhagarsami Azhagarsamiyin Kuthirai Tamil
For the sheer vitality in performance and credible characterization that Appukutty brings to the screen in portraying a truly unusual role.
[39]
2012
(60th)
Annu Kapoor Dr. Baldev Chaddha Vicky Donor Hindi
As a medical professional running a fertility clinic, the actor has performed with panache, which forms the central core of the film.
[40]
2013
(61st)
Saurabh Shukla Justice Sunderlal Tripathi Jolly LLB Hindi
For a heart-warming and exuberant performance as a judge, who discovers his authority and conscience in the process of conducting a high profile case.
[41]
2014
(62nd)
Bobby Simha Assault Sethu Jigarthanda Tamil
For an engaging portrayal of a dreaded Mafia don who plays both the villain and the comic with a rare flamboyance and abandon.
[42]
2015
(63rd)
Samuthirakani Muthuvel Visaranai Tamil
Minimalistic yet moving performance as a cop, caught in a moral dilemma.
[43]
2016
(64th)
Manoj Joshi KeshavDashkriya Marathi
For an accomplish portrayal of the character.
[44]
2017
(65th)
Fahadh Faasil Prasad Thondimuthalum Driksakshiyum Malayalam   [45]
2018
(66th)
Swanand Kirkire Prasanna Chumbak Marathi
For the ability to invoke empathy in the audience.
[46]
2019
(67th)
Vijay Sethupathi Shilpa (Manickam) [lower-alpha 6] Super Deluxe Tamil   [47]

See also

Footnotes

  1. Before the 54th National Film Awards (2006), the cash prize was 10,000 (US$140). [3]
  2. 1 2 Year in which the film was censored by the Central Board of Film Certification.
  3. The "Ref." cites the winner and the role played by them in the film. While there are some sources that are written in both English and Hindi, certain references are entirely in Hindi language.
  4. Chandrasekhar played the role of a man suffering from tetraplegia. [29]
  5. Dilip Prabhavalkar played the image of Mahatma Gandhi. [33]
  6. Vijay Sethupathi played the character of a transgender.

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