National Film Award for Best Supporting Actress

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National Film Award for Best Supporting Actress
National award for contributions to Indian cinema
Awarded forBest Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role
Sponsored by Directorate of Film Festivals
Reward(s)
  • Rajat Kamal (Silver Lotus)
  • 50,000 (US$780)
First awarded1984
Last awarded2019
Most recent winner Pallavi Joshi for The Tashkent Files
Highlights
Total awarded39
First winner Rohini Hattangadi
Website https://dff.gov.in/Archive.aspx?ID=6   OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg

The National Film Award for Best Supporting Actress is an honour presented annually at India's National Film Awards ceremony by the Directorate of Film Festivals (DFF), an organisation set up by the Indian Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. [1] Since 1984, the award is given by a national panel appointed annually by the DFF to an actress for the best performance in a supporting role within Indian cinema. [1] [2] It is presented by the President of India at a ceremony held in New Delhi. [3]

Contents

The winner is given a "Rajat Kamal" (Silver Lotus) certificate and a cash prize of 50,000 (US$780). [lower-alpha 1] Including ties and repeat winners, the DFF has presented a total of 39 Best Supporting Actress awards to 35 different actresses. Although Indian cinema produces films in more than 20 languages, [1] the performances of films that have won awards are of ten languages: Hindi (17 awards), Malayalam (7 awards), Bengali (4 awards), Tamil (3 awards), English (2 awards), Meitei (1 award), Marathi (1 award), Urdu (1 award), Haryanvi (1 award).

The first recipient was Rohini Hattangadi, who was honoured at the 32nd National Film Awards for her performance in the Hindi film Party (1984). [5] As of 2019, Surekha Sikri have been honoured thrice for her hindi films - Tamas (1987), Mammo (1994) and Badhaai Ho (2018). [6] K. P. A. C. Lalitha won the award two times for her work in the Malayalam films Amaram (1990) and Shantham (2000). [7] Egyptian actress Aida El-Kashef, who was honoured at the 61st National Film Awards for her performance in the English-Hindi film Ship of Theseus (2013) is the only non-Indian actress to win the award. [8] Urvasi and Kalpana are the only siblings to receive the honour. Ties between two actresses have occurred in the years 1999, 2012 and 2013. Sharmila Tagore, Konkona Sen Sharma and Kangana Ranaut are the three actresses to receive honours in both acting categories: Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress. The most recent recipient is Pallavi Joshi, who was honoured at the 67th National Film Awards for her performance in the Hindi film The Tashkent Files (2019).

Recipients

Key

SymbolMeaning
Dagger-14-plain.pngIndicates a joint award for that year
Rohini Hattangadi was the first recipient of the award. Rohini Hattangadi.jpg
Rohini Hattangadi was the first recipient of the award.
Surekha Sikri has been the most honoured (three times) actress in the category. . Surekha Sikri.jpg
Surekha Sikri has been the most honoured (three times) actress in the category. .
Kangna Ranaut, July 2015.jpg
Konkona at Taj lands end.jpg
Kangana Ranaut(top), Konkona Sen Sharma(middle) and Sharmila Tagore has received honours in both acting categories: Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress. Sharmila T Lux-Award 2016.jpg
Kangana Ranaut(top), Konkona Sen Sharma(middle) and Sharmila Tagore has received honours in both acting categories: Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress.
List of award recipients, showing the year, role, film and language(s).
Year [lower-alpha 2] RecipientRoleWorkLanguage(s)CitationRef. [lower-alpha 3]
1984
(32nd)
Rohini Hattangadi Mohini Barve Party Hindi   [2]
1985
(33rd)
Vijaya Mehta Mausi Rao Saheb Hindi
For the delicate delineation of the role of a middle-aged widow fighting for modernity though herself rooted in tradition.
[10]
1986
(34th)
Manjula Kanwar ChampaBhangala Silata Odia
For a startlingly realistic portrayal of an exploited, illiterate woman who lives like a haunted animal, trapped into accepting her ultimate fate.
[11]
1987
(35th)
Surekha Sikri Rajo Tamas Hindi
For her compelling performance as a woman who has not lost her innate human goodness even under the most adverse and stressful conditions of the holocaust.
[12]
1988
(36th)
Uttara Baokar Sudha Ek Din Achanak Hindi
For playing the difficult role of a wife caught in the midst of unique social and psychological predicament.
[13]
1989
(37th)
Manorama Unknown Pudhea Paadhai Tamil
For the versatility shown.
[14]
1990
(38th)
K. P. A. C. Lalitha Bhargavi Amaram Malayalam
For portraying an ethnic character with authenticity.
[15]
1991
(39th)
Santha Devi Unknown Yamanam Malayalam
For her work in the film, who lives the role of the understanding and tormented mother.
[16]
1992
(40th)
Revathi Panchavarnam Thevar Magan Tamil
For compelling and convincing performance of an innocent village girl, giving it an effortlessly charming naturalness.
[17]
1993
(41st)
Neena Gupta Geeta Devi Woh Chokri Hindi
For a realistic portrayal of a loving mother and a betrayed wife, revealing shades of love, hate and anxiety.
[18]
1994
(42nd)
Surekha Sikri Fayyazi Mammo Hindi
For her portrayal of surrogate mother, underplayed with quite sensitivity and gentleness
[19]
1995
(43rd)
Aranmula Ponnamma Grandmother Kathapurushan Malayalam
For her work in the film in which she plays the role of a grand mother with tremendous sensitivity which makes her presence in the film memorable.
[20]
1996
(44th)
Rajeshwari Sachdev Sakina Sardari Begum Urdu
For her role in the film, in which she depicts the aspirations and agony of a lonely teenage girl.
[21]
1997
(45th)
Karisma Kapoor Nisha Sandhu Dil To Pagal Hai Hindi
For her spirited and moving performance as a young woman who values friendship and love.
[22]
1998
(46th)
Suhasini Mulay Maltibai Barve Hu Tu Tu Hindi
For bringing alive negative personality without losing her human face. She acts with conviction and comes up with a powerful performance.
[23]
1999
(47th)
Dagger-14-plain.png
Sudipta Chakraborty Malati Bariwali Bengali
For playing the zest for life of a maidservant who comes from the slums and lives in a Haveli.
[24]
Sohini Sengupta Khuku Paromitar Ek Din Bengali
For breathing life into the schizophrenic daughter who knows she is a burden on her mother, but cannot help it.
2000
(48th)
K. P. A. C. Lalitha Narayani Shantham Malayalam
For the role of Narayani in the film. Narayani is an elderly mother whose son has been killed in political violence. In the course of the film, she is transformed, gently and unobtrusiveuly into a crusade for peace. Lalitha brings great professional skills and sensitivity to the role.
[25]
2001
(49th)
Ananya Khare Deepa Pandey Chandni Bar Hindi
For her humane and realistic performance of a complex character.
[26]
2002
(50th)
Rakhee Gulzar Ranga Pishima Shubho Mahurat Bengali
For her finely balanced portrayal of an enigmatic and unlikely detective against a simple middle class background.
[27]
2003
(51st)
Sharmila Tagore Aparna Abar Aranye Bengali
For the grace with which she handles social and personal relationships.
[28]
2004
(52nd)
Sheela Margaret D'Costa Akale Malayalam
For the grace with which she handles the tragedy of a community that is slowly fading away.
[29]
2005
(53rd)
Urvashi K. P. Vanaja Achuvinte Amma Malayalam
For the highly credible performance of a brave woman who pledges her life and love for an adopted child.
[4]
2006
(54th)
Konkona Sen Sharma Indu Tyagi Omkara Hindi
For the textured characterisation of a village woman trying to bring sanity in the violent lives of a political family in Uttar Pradesh.
[30]
2007
(55th)
Shefali Shah Vandana The Last Lear English
For her smoldering portrayal of a woman dealing with her intense relationship with an older man with a towering personality.
[31]
2008
(56th)
Kangana Ranaut Shonali Gujral Fashion Hindi
For compelling portrayal of a down and out super model that enriches the impact of the film.
[32]
2009
(57th)
Arundathi Nag Vidya's Mother ("Bum") Paa Hindi
For the restraint with which she conveys strength, compassion and understanding to her daughter, a single mother, bringing up a son stricken with a rare degenerative disease.
[33]
2010
(58th)
Sukumari Ammini Amma Namma Gramam Tamil
For the sensitive portrayal of an aged widow who challenges orthodoxy when crippling ritualistic restrictions are imposed upon her widowed teenaged granddaughter.
[34]
2011
(59th)
Leishangthem Tonthoingambi Devi Yaipabhee Phijigee Mani Meitei
For the dignity and power with which L. T. Devi informs the character Yaipabhee in this tightly controlled Manipuri story.
[35]
2012
(60th)
Dagger-14-plain.png
Dolly Ahluwalia Dolly Arora Vicky Donor Hindi
As an urban, middle-class housewife, the actor brings to life the daily ups and downs of a mother with a balanced touch of humour.
[36]
Kalpana Razia Beevi Thanichalla Njan Malayalam
The role of a large-hearted yet conventional Muslim lady harbouring a hapless Hindu woman, respecting all her religious sentiments, has been portrayed with a certain natural flair by the actor.
2013
(61st)
Dagger-14-plain.png
Amruta Subhash Channamma Astu Marathi
Amruta touchingly portrays the emotions of a poor woman who brings to life compassion and warmth in dealing with human relationships.
[8]
Aida El-Kashef Aliya Kamal Ship of Theseus English/Hindi
For a sensitive portrayal of a blind photographer who entirely depends on her intuitive creative power and has a fiercely independent mind.
2014
(62nd)
Baljinder Kaur UnknownPagdi – The Honour Haryanvi
For a very expressive performance as a gritty rustic woman who struggles as wife and mother to keep her family intact in a society obsessed with patriarchal honour.
[37]
2015
(63rd)
Tanvi Azmi Radhabai Bajirao Mastani Hindi
For her powerful portrayal of a royal widow caught in the vortex of love for her son and commitment to the clan.
[38]
2016
(64th)
Zaira Wasim Young Geeta Phogat Dangal Hindi
She portrays a female sports person’s battle with the society with utmost maturity.
[39]
2017
(65th)
Divya Dutta Ramadeep Braitch Irada Hindi   [40]
2018
(66th)
Surekha Sikri Durga Devi Kaushik ("Dadi") Badhaai Ho Hindi
A compelling performance as a Matriarch with a modern attitude.
[41]
2019
(67th)
Pallavi Joshi Ayisha Ali Shah The Tashkent Files Hindi  

See also

Footnotes

  1. Before the 54th National Film Awards (2006), the cash prize was 10,000 (US$140). [4]
  2. Year in which the film was censored by the Central Board of Film Certification.
  3. The reference cites the winner and the role played by them in the film. While there are some sources that are written in both English and Hindi, other references are entirely in Hindi.

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