National highways of Japan

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National Highways of Japan
Japanese National Route Sign Blank.svg
A structure of a blank national route shield.
System information
Maintained by Ministry of Land and Prefectures
Length55,222.3 km [1] (34,313.5 mi)
Formed1952
Highway names
System links
National highways of Japan
Expressways of Japan

Japan has a nationwide system of national highways (一般国道, Ippan Kokudō) distinct from the expressways. The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism and other government agencies administer the national highways. Beginning in 1952, Japan classified these as Class 1 or Class 2. Class 1 highways had one- or two-digit numbers, while Class 2 highways had three-digit numbers. For example, routes 1 and 57 were Class 1 highways while 507 (the one with the highest number) was a Class 2 highway.

Contents

A 1964 amendment to the governing law resulted in a unification of the classes, which took effect in April of the following year. Highways numbered since that time have had three-digit numbers, so the numbers 58–100, which had so far been unused, remained unused. However, when Okinawa Prefecture reverted to Japanese control in 1972, Route 58, with its southern endpoint in Okinawa's capital city of Naha, was established. The numbers from 59 to 100 remain unused. Some other numbers have been vacated by the joining or changing of routes: 109 (joined with 108), 110 (renumbered as 48), 111 (renumbered as 45), 214–216 (joined to form 57).

List of national highways

1 to 58

Initially established as "Class 1 highways", except Route 58

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58

101 to 199

101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199

200 to 299

200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299

300 to 399

300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399

400 to 499

400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499

500 to 507

500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507

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Expressways in South Korea

Expressways in South Korea, officially called as National expressways, are operated by the Korea Expressway Corporation. They were originally numbered in order of construction. Since August 24, 2001, they have been numbered in a scheme somewhat similar to that of the Interstate Highway System in the United States; the icons of the South Korean Expressways are notably similar to those in the United States because they are shaped like U.S. Highway shields and colored like Interstate shields with red, white, and blue, the colors of the flag of South Korea.

Spur route Short road forming a branch from a freeway, Interstate Highway, or motorway

A spur route is a short road forming a branch from a longer, more important road such as a freeway, Interstate Highway, or motorway. A bypass or beltway should not be considered a true spur route as it typically reconnects with another or the same major road.

A routenumber, designation or abbreviation is an identifying numeric designation assigned by a highway authority to a particular stretch of roadway to distinguish it from other routes and, in many cases, also to indicate its classification, general geographical location and/or orientation. The numbers chosen may be used solely for internal administrative purposes; however, in most cases they are also displayed on roadside signage and indicated on maps.

Tōmei Expressway National expressway on the island of Honshū in Japan

The Tōmei Expressway is a national expressway on the island of Honshū in Japan. It is operated by Central Nippon Expressway Company. The expressway is designated as E1 under the "2016 Proposal for Realization of Expressway Numbering", because it parallels National Route 1. It is a part of the Asian Highway Network.

Expressways of Japan

The expressways of Japan make up a large network of controlled-access toll expressways.

National Route 4 is a major national highway in eastern Honshū, Japan. Measuring 738.5-kilometer-long (458.9 mi) it is the longest highway in the country. When oversea routes are included, it is the second longest highway in Japan, with National Route 58 then measuring 884.4 kilometers (549.5 mi) because of its maritime sections. The highway connects Tokyo and Aomori via Utsunomiya, Kōriyama, Sendai, and Morioka.

Japan National Route 1 Japanese road from Tokyo to Osaka, major road on the island of Honshū in Japan.

National Route 1 is a major highway on the island of Honshū in Japan. It connects Chūō, Tokyo in the Kantō region with the city of Osaka, Osaka Prefecture in the Kansai region, passing through the Chūbu region en route. It follows the old Tōkaidō westward from Tokyo to Kyoto, and the old Kyo Kaidō from there to Osaka. Between Tokyo and Aichi Prefecture it parallels the Tomei Expressway; from there to Mie Prefecture, the Higashi-Meihan Expressway, and from Shiga Prefecture to Osaka, the Meishin Expressway. It has a total length of 760.9 kilometers (472.8 mi). At its eastern terminus in Nihonbashi, Chūō, Tokyo, it meets National Routes 4, 6, 14, 15, 17, and 20. At its western terminus in Umeda, Kita-ku, Osaka, it links with Routes 2, 25, 26 and other highways.

Japan National Route 2 Road in Japan

National Route 2 is a major highway on the islands of Honshū and Kyūshū in Japan. It follows the old Sanyōdo westward from the city of Osaka, Osaka Prefecture in the Kansai region to the city of Kitakyūshū in Fukuoka Prefecture, passing through the San'yō region en route. Between Hyōgo Prefecture and Yamaguchi Prefecture it parallels the Sanyō Expressway; it crosses the Kanmon Straits through the Kanmon Roadway Tunnel. Its total length is 533.2 km. At its Osaka terminus, it meets Route 1; at its western terminus, it links with Routes 3 and 10.

National Route 58 is a Japanese national highway connecting the capital cities Kagoshima and Naha of Kagoshima Prefecture and Okinawa Prefecture, respectively. With a total length of 884.4 kilometers (549.5 mi), it is the longest national highway in Japan, though it measures only 245.2 kilometers (152.4 mi) on land. The highway begins at an intersection with National Routes 3 and 10 in Kagoshima. From Kagoshima, it travels southwest along the first island chain that divides the Pacific Ocean from the East China Sea. From the north to the south, it has sections on the islands of Tanegashima, Amami Ōshima, and finally, Okinawa. On Okinawa it ends at an intersection with National Routes 330, 331, and 390 in Naha.

Japan National Route 20 Highway in Japan

National Route 20 is a national highway connecting Tokyo and Shiojiri, Nagano prefecture in Japan. Originating at Nihonbashi in Chūō, Tokyo, it passes through Shinjuku and four other wards, and then seven cities, including Hachiōji in Tokyo. It follows a westward route into Kanagawa Prefecture, passing through the city of Sagamihara and one town. Continuing into Yamanashi Prefecture, the highway passes through nine cities and towns, among them the prefectural capital of Kofu. In Nagano Prefecture, National Route 20 passes through five cities and towns before entering Shiojiri, where it terminates at the intersection of National Routes 19 and 153. The highway is 225.0 km long.

Japan National Route 13

National Route 13 is a highway in Japan on the island of Honshū which runs from Fukushima in Fukushima Prefecture to Akita in Akita Prefecture.

Japan National Route 14

National Route 14 is a national highway connecting Tokyo and Chiba in Japan.

Akita Expressway Expressway in Iwate and Akita prefectures in Japan

The Akita Expressway is a national expressway in the Tōhoku region of Japan. The 229.2-kilometer-long (142.4 mi) expressway begins at an interchange with the Tōhoku Expressway in Kitakami, Iwate from where it proceeds northwest towards the capital of Akita Prefecture, Akita. From there, it travels northeast back to another interchange along the Tōhoku Expressway in the town of Kosaka. It is jointly owned and operated by East Nippon Expressway Company and the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT). The Akita Expressway is numbered E7 between Kosaka and Kitakami Junctions and E46 between Kitakami and Kawabe Junctions under the MLIT's "2016 Proposal for Realization of Expressway Numbering."

Japan National Route 42

National Route 42, also called Kumano Kaidō or Tropical Route is a national highway connecting Hamamatsu, Shizuoka and Wakayama, Wakayama in Japan. Part of the route requires crossing Ise Bay on the Ise-wan Ferry.

National Route 105 is a national highway of Japan that traverses the prefecture of Akita in a southwest–northeast routing. It connects the city of Kitaakita in north-central Akita Prefecture and Yurihonjō on the prefecture's southwestern coast. It has a total length of 170.0 kilometers (105.6 mi).

Japan National Route 390

National Route 390 is both the southernmost and westernmost of the national highways of Japan. It connects Ishigaki, Okinawa on Ishigaki Island, to Miyako-jima, and Naha, Okinawa on Okinawa Island in Japan. Spanning the three islands by ferry, the highway has a total length of 58.2 kilometers (36.2 mi) on land and 552.2 kilometers (343.1 mi) when maritime distance is added.

Japan National Route 507 Road in Okinawa prefecture, Japan

National Route 507 is a national highway of Japan connecting between Itoman, Okinawa and Naha, Okinawa in Japan, with total length of 26.5 km (16.46 mi).

Naha Airport Expressway

The Naha Airport Expressway is an expressway on Okinawa Island in Okinawa Prefecture, Japan. The expressway has a length of 11.7 kilometres (7.3 mi). The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism maintains most of the expressway, but the West Nippon Expressway Company is the owner and operator of a short section of the expressway at its eastern end. It is signed E58 as a spur route of the Okinawa Expressway under the "2016 Proposal for Realization of Expressway Numbering". It also carries the entire length of National Route 506.

Road transport is an essential element of the Japanese transport network, and vital part of the Japanese economy. Japan's history of having human-made roads ranging from the present to the Jōmon period. The Gokishichidō of the Asuka period and the Edo period kaidō both figured into the government's attempts to centralize their authority. As of April 2012, Japan had a road network of approximately 1,215,000 kilometers (755,000 mi) of roads made up of 1,022,000 kilometers (635,000 mi) of city, town and village roads, 129,000 kilometers (80,000 mi) of prefectural roads, 55,000 kilometers (34,000 mi) of national highways, and 8,050 kilometers (5,000 mi) of expressways.

References

  1. Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport. "Road Administration in Japan" (PDF). Retrieved 2017-11-09.