Navajo County, Arizona

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Navajo County
Navajo County
Historic Navajo County Courthouse and Museum cropped.jpg
Historic Navajo County Courthouse and Museum in Holbrook
Navajo County, Az.png
Seal
Map of Arizona highlighting Navajo County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Arizona
Arizona in United States.svg
Arizona's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 35°29′52″N110°17′23″W / 35.497777777778°N 110.28972222222°W / 35.497777777778; -110.28972222222
Country Flag of the United States.svg United States
State Flag of Arizona.svg  Arizona
FoundedMarch 21, 1895
Seat Holbrook
Largest city Show Low
Area
  Total9,960 sq mi (25,800 km2)
  Land9,950 sq mi (25,800 km2)
  Water9.3 sq mi (24 km2)  0.09%%
Population
  Estimate 
(2018)
110,445
  Density11/sq mi (4/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain)
Congressional district 1st
Website www.navajocountyaz.gov

Navajo County is located in the northern part of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, its population was 107,449. [1] The county seat is Holbrook. [2]

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders.

Arizona U.S. state in the United States

Arizona is a state in the southwestern region of the United States. It is also part of the Western and the Mountain states. It is the sixth largest and the 14th most populous of the 50 states. Its capital and largest city is Phoenix. Arizona shares the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico; its other neighboring states are Nevada and California to the west and the Mexican states of Sonora and Baja California to the south and southwest.

2010 United States Census 23rd national census of the United States, taken in 2010

The 2010 United States Census is the twenty-third and most recent United States national census. National Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010. The census was taken via mail-in citizen self-reporting, with enumerators serving to spot-check randomly selected neighborhoods and communities. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired. The population of the United States was counted as 308,745,538, a 9.7% increase from the 2000 Census. This was the first census in which all states recorded a population of over half a million people as well as the first in which all 100 largest cities recorded populations of over 200,000.

Contents

Navajo County comprises the Show Low, Arizona Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Show Low, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

Show Low is a city in Navajo County, Arizona, United States. It lies on the Mogollon Rim in east central Arizona, at an elevation of 6,345 feet. The city was established in 1870 and incorporated in 1953. According to the 2010 census, the population of the city was 10,660.

Navajo County contains parts of the Hopi Indian reservation, the Navajo Nation, and Fort Apache Indian Reservation.

Hopi Reservation Indian reservation in United States, Hopi

The Hopi Reservation is a Native American reservation for the Hopi and Arizona Tewa people, surrounded entirely by the Navajo Nation, in Navajo and Coconino counties of Arizona, United States. The site in north-eastern Arizona has a land area of 2,531.773 sq mi (6,557.262 km²) and as of the 2000 census had a population of 6,946. The Hopi Reservation, like most of Arizona but unlike the surrounding Navajo Nation, does not observe daylight saving time. Until recently, the two nations shared the Navajo–Hopi Joint Use Area. The partition of this area, commonly known as Big Mountain, by Acts of Congress in 1974 and 1996, has resulted in continuing controversy.

Navajo Nation Reservation

The Navajo Nation is a Native American territory covering about 17,544,500 acres, occupying portions of northeastern Arizona, southeastern Utah, and northwestern New Mexico in the United States. This is the largest land area retained by a Native American tribe, with a population of roughly 350,000 as of 2016.

Fort Apache Indian Reservation

The Fort Apache Indian Reservation is an Indian reservation in Arizona, United States, encompassing parts of Navajo, Gila, and Apache counties. It is home to the federally recognized White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, a Western Apache tribe. It has a land area of 2,627 square miles (6,800 km2) and a population of 12,429 people as of the 2000 census. The largest community is in Whiteriver.

History

Navajo County was split from Apache County on March 21, 1895. The first county sheriff was Commodore Perry Owens, a legendary gunman who had previously served as the sheriff of Apache County. It was the location for many of the events of the Pleasant Valley War.

A sheriff is a government official, with varying duties, existing in some countries with historical ties to England, where the office originated. There is an analogous although independently developed office in Iceland that is commonly translated to English as sheriff, and this is discussed below.

Gunfighter person able to shoot quickly and accurately with a gun

Gunslinger and gunfighter are words used historically to refer to men in the American Old West who had gained a reputation of being dangerous with a gun and had participated in gunfights and shootouts. Gunman was a more common term used for these individuals in the 19th century. Today, the term "gunslinger" is more or less used to denote someone who is quick on the draw with a pistol, but can also refer to riflemen and shotgun messengers. The gunfighter is also one of the most popular characters in the Western genre and has appeared in associated films, video games, and literature.

Pleasant Valley War

The Pleasant Valley War, sometimes called the Tonto Basin Feud, or Tonto Basin War, or Tewksbury-Graham Feud, was a range war fought in Pleasant Valley, Arizona in the years 1882-1892. The conflict involved two feuding families, the ranchers Grahams and Tewksburys. The Tewksburys, who were part Indian, started their operations as cattle ranchers before branching out to sheep.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 9,960 square miles (25,800 km2), of which 9,950 square miles (25,800 km2) is land and 9.3 square miles (24 km2) (0.09%) is water. [3]

Navajo County offers not only the Monument Valley, but Keams Canyon, part of the Petrified Forest National Park, and one of the largest contiguous ponderosa pine forest in North America.

Monument Valley Area characterized by distinctive buttes and mesas in the American West

Monument Valley is a region of the Colorado Plateau characterized by a cluster of vast sandstone buttes, the largest reaching 1,000 ft (300 m) above the valley floor. It is located on the Arizona–Utah border, near the Four Corners area. The valley lies within the territory of the Navajo Nation Reservation and is accessible from U.S. Highway 163.

Petrified Forest National Park national park of the United States

Petrified Forest National Park is an American national park in Navajo and Apache counties in northeastern Arizona. Named for its large deposits of petrified wood, the fee (chargeable) area of the park covers about 230 square miles, encompassing semi-desert shrub steppe as well as highly eroded and colorful badlands. The park's headquarters is about 26 miles (42 km) east of Holbrook along Interstate 40 (I-40), which parallels the BNSF Railway's Southern Transcon, the Puerco River, and historic U.S. Route 66, all crossing the park roughly east–west. The site, the northern part of which extends into the Painted Desert, was declared a national monument in 1906 and a national park in 1962. The park received 644,922 recreational visitors in 2018. Typical visitor activities include sightseeing, photography, hiking, and backpacking.

Adjacent counties

Indian reservations

Navajo County has 6,632.73 square miles (17,178.7 km2) of federally designated Indian reservation within its borders, the third most of any county in the United States (neighboring Apache County and Coconino County are first and second). In descending order of territory within the county, the reservations are the Navajo Nation, Hopi Indian Reservation, and Fort Apache Indian Reservation, all of which are partly located within Navajo County.

National protected areas

Petroglyphs at Rock Art Canyon Ranch near Winslow Giants, Petroglyphs at Rock Art Ranch.jpg
Petroglyphs at Rock Art Canyon Ranch near Winslow

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1900 8,829
1910 11,47129.9%
1920 16,07740.2%
1930 21,20231.9%
1940 25,30919.4%
1950 29,44616.3%
1960 37,99429.0%
1970 47,71525.6%
1980 67,62941.7%
1990 77,65814.8%
2000 97,47025.5%
2010 107,44910.2%
Est. 2018110,445 [4] 2.8%
U.S. Decennial Census [5]
1790–1960 [6] 1900–1990 [7]
1990–2000 [8] 2010–2018 [1]

2000 census

As of the 2000 census, there were 97,470 people, 30,043 households, and 23,073 families residing in the county. The population density was 10 people per square mile (4/km²). There were 47,413 housing units at an average density of 5 per square mile (2/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 47.74% Native American, 45.91% White, 0.88% Black or African American, 0.33% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 3.15% from other races, and 55.94% from two or more races. 8.22% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 24.77% reported speaking Navajo at home, 5.94% other Southern Athabaskan languages, 4.71% Spanish, and 3.23% Hopi. [9]

There were 30,043 households out of which 40.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.50% were married couples living together, 16.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.20% were non-families. 19.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.17 and the average family size was 3.68.

In the county, the population was spread out with 35.40% under the age of 18, 8.80% from 18 to 24, 25.30% from 25 to 44, 20.40% from 45 to 64, and 10.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females there were 98.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,569, and the median income for a family was $32,409. Males had a median income of $30,509 versus $21,621 for females. The per capita income for the county was $11,609. About 23.40% of families and 29.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 36.60% of those under age 18 and 20.30% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 census, there were 107,449 people, 35,658 households, and 25,923 families residing in the county. [10] The population density was 10.8 inhabitants per square mile (4.2/km2). There were 56,938 housing units at an average density of 5.7 per square mile (2.2/km2). [11] The racial makeup of the county was 49.3% white, 43.4% American Indian, 0.9% black or African American, 0.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 3.4% from other races, and 2.5% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 10.8% of the population. [10] In terms of ancestry, 13.7% were German, 12.5% were English, 9.3% were Irish, and 2.3% were American. [12]

Of the 35,658 households, 39.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.1% were married couples living together, 17.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 27.3% were non-families, and 23.0% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.95 and the average family size was 3.50. The median age was 34.7 years. [10]

The median income for a household in the county was $39,774 and the median income for a family was $45,906. Males had a median income of $41,516 versus $28,969 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,745. About 19.1% of families and 24.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 32.6% of those under age 18 and 12.4% of those age 65 or over. [13]

Politics

Navajo County leans towards the Republican Party. Although its Native American population makes up nearly half of the county, a demographic that politically favors those of the Democratic Party, the county has a strong The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints presence (particularly in population centers such as Snowflake) that normally allows Republican candidates to carry the county by small margins. However, in the 2018 gubernatorial election, the county voted Republican over Democrat by a large margin (56.4%-41.5%).

Presidential elections results
Navajo County Presidential election results [14] [15]
Year Republican Democratic Others
2016 51.1%20,57740.9% 16,4598.1% 3,258
2012 53.1%19,88445.2% 16,9451.7% 636
2008 55.0%19,76143.4% 15,5791.7% 592
2004 53.3%17,27745.7% 14,8151.0% 312
2000 49.3%12,38646.9% 11,7943.9% 967
1996 37.1% 9,26251.8%12,91211.1% 2,764
1992 32.5% 7,99444.2%10,88223.4% 5,762
1988 52.8%10,39345.9% 9,0231.3% 261
1984 58.1%11,37941.0% 8,0170.9% 182
1980 63.9%10,79030.3% 5,1105.8% 982
1976 46.7% 6,79650.3%7,3233.0% 441
1972 60.5%6,99934.6% 4,0034.9% 570
1968 51.0%4,59632.5% 2,93016.5% 1,486
1964 50.5%4,87049.4% 4,7700.1% 9
1960 57.2%4,09042.7% 3,0520.1% 9
1956 65.8%3,92834.1% 2,0330.2% 9
1952 57.3%3,47842.7% 2,593
1948 40.3% 1,84158.5%2,6691.2% 56
1944 37.1% 1,57962.6%2,6600.3% 13
1940 33.4% 1,53366.4%3,0520.3% 12
1936 25.4% 1,05273.3%3,0371.3% 53
1932 30.1% 1,24862.8%2,6027.1% 296
1928 55.0%1,60845.0% 1,316
1924 42.9%1,06027.7% 68429.4% 727
1920 51.1%1,07848.9% 1,031
1916 30.5% 57465.9%1,2403.6% 67
1912 22.9% 16839.1%28738.1% 280

Education

School districts that serve the county include:

Transportation

Major highways

Airports

The following public-use airports are located within the county: [16]

Communities

Cities

Towns

Ghost Towns

Census-designated places

Other communities

Indian communities

County population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Navajo County. [17] [18]

county seat

RankCity/Town/etc.Population (2010 Census)Municipal typeIncorporated
1 Show Low 10,660City1953
2 Winslow 9,655City1900
3 Snowflake 5,590Town1953 (founded)
4 Kayenta 5,189CDP
5Holbrook 5,053City1917
6 Pinetop-Lakeside 4,282Town1984
7 Taylor 4,112Town1966
8 Whiteriver 4,104CDP
9Lake of the Woods4,094CDP
10 Heber-Overgaard 2,822CDP
11 Linden 2,597CDP
12 White Mountain Lake 2,205CDP
13Pinetop Country Club1,794CDP
14 Cibecue 1,730CDP
15Wagon Wheel1,652CDP
16 First Mesa 1,555CDP
17North Fork1,417CDP
18 Joseph City 1,386CDP
19 Dilkon 1,184CDP
20Rainbow City968CDP
21 Second Mesa 962CDP
22 Hotevilla-Bacavi 957CDP
23 Pinon 904CDP
24 Shongopovi 831CDP
25Whitecone817CDP
26Hondah812CDP
27Low Mountain757CDP
28 Kykotsmovi Village 746CDP
29Seven Mile707CDP
30 East Fork 699CDP
31 Shonto 591CDP
32 Greasewood 547CDP
33 McNary (mostly in Apache County )528CDP
34 Chilchinbito 506CDP
35 Pinedale 487CDP
36Tees Toh448CDP
37 Winslow West (partially in Coconino County )438CDP
38 Clay Springs 401CDP
39 Sun Valley 316CDP
40 Keams Canyon 304CDP
41Turkey Creek294CDP
42 Jeddito 293CDP
43 Indian Wells 255CDP
44 Woodruff 191CDP
45 Oljato-Monument Valley 154CDP
46 Fort Apache 143CDP
47Seba Dalkai136CDP
48Hard Rock94CDP

See also

Related Research Articles

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Window Rock, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

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Winslow West, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

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Cibecue is a census-designated place (CDP) in Navajo County, Arizona, United States. The population was 1713 in the 2010 United States Census.

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East Fork is a census-designated place (CDP) in Navajo County, Arizona, United States. The population was 699 at the 2010 census.

First Mesa, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

First Mesa is a census-designated place (CDP) in Navajo County, Arizona, United States, on the Hopi Reservation. As of the 2010 census, the CDP population was 1,555, spread among three Hopi villages atop the 5,700-foot mesa: Hano, Sitsomovi, and Waalpi.

Greasewood, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Greasewood is a census-designated place (CDP) in Navajo County, Arizona, United States. The population was 547 at the 2010 census.

Holbrook, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

Holbrook is a city in Navajo County, Arizona, United States. According to the 2010 census, the population of the city was 5,053. The city is the county seat of Navajo County.

Hotevilla-Bacavi, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Hotevilla-Bacavi is a census-designated place (CDP) in Navajo County, Arizona, United States, on the Hopi Reservation. The population was 957 at the 2010 census.

Jeddito, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Jeddito is a census-designated place (CDP) in Navajo County, Arizona, United States. The population was 293 at the 2010 census.

Shongopovi, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Shongopovi is a census-designated place (CDP) in Navajo County, Arizona. It is located on the Second Mesa, within the Hopi Reservation.

Whiteriver, Arizona Census designated place in Arizona, United States

Whiteriver is a census-designated place (CDP) located on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation in Navajo County, Arizona, United States. The population was 4,104 at the 2010 census, making it the largest settlement on the Reservation.

Northland Pioneer College (NPC) is a public community college serving an area in Show Low, Arizona. Campuses are located in four of the largest Navajo County communities: Holbrook, Show Low, Snowflake, and Winslow. Five centers are located in Hopi/Polacca, Kayenta, Springerville, St. Johns, and Whiteriver. NPC also partners with community members in Apache County, Arizona. NPC is governed by the Navajo County Community College District, the nation’s second-largest community college service area – 21,158 square miles (54,800 km2). The Navajo, Hopi, and White Mountain Apache Indian Reservations occupy more than forty percent of the total land in the college's service area. NPC has an open admissions policy.

Whiteriver Unified School District is a school district in Navajo County, Arizona, United States.

Oljato-Monument Valley, Arizona Place in Arizona, United States

Oljato-Monument Valley is a census-designated place (CDP) in Navajo County, Arizona, United States. The population was 154 at the 2010 census.

Sanders, Arizona Census-designated place in Arizona, United States

Sanders is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Apache County, Arizona, United States. Sanders is located at the junction of U.S. Route 191 and Interstate 40. As of the 2010 census, it had a population of 630.

References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 23, 2012. Retrieved August 23, 2015.
  4. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved May 10, 2019.
  5. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  6. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  7. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  8. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  9. "Language Map Data Center". Mla.org. July 17, 2007. Retrieved August 27, 2012.
  10. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  11. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  12. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  13. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  14. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-06-12.
  15. Scammon, Richard M. (compiler); America at the Polls: A Handbook of Presidential Election Statistics 1920-1964; pp. 42-44 ISBN   0405077114
  16. Navajo County Public and Private Airports, Arizona:
  17. https://www.census.gov/2010census/
  18. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/maps/block/2010/

Coordinates: 35°29′52″N110°17′23″W / 35.49778°N 110.28972°W / 35.49778; -110.28972