Nearer the Moon

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Nearer the Moon: From a Journal of Love, the Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin
NearertheMoonCover.jpg
Front cover
Author Anaïs Nin
LanguageEnglish
Genre Memoir, Diary
Publisher Harcourt Brace & Company
Publication date
1996
Media typePrint (Hardcover and Paperback)
ISBN 0-15-100089-1
818.5203 DC 20
LC Class PS3527.I865 Z47 1996
Preceded by Fire: From A Journal of Love  

Nearer the Moon: From a Journal of Love (full title Nearer the Moon: From a Journal of Love, the Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin (19371939)) is a 1996 book based upon material excerpted from the unpublished diaries of Anaïs Nin. It corresponds temporally to part of Nin's published diaries. It consists mainly of material that was left out of the published version because it would have hurt people involved or their relationships with Anaïs Nin had it been published at the time.

Contents

The book displays the range of Nin's moods and emotions. She avoided re-writing or writing long afterward, when possible, in order to preserve the truth about how she felt at the time of each entry. As the diaries go on, they become more poetical or stream of consciousness, as opposed to objective. She is sometimes very explicit about her sexual activity and how she feels about it. The sources of some of her erotic stories can be recognized here. Generally the bazaar Latin American settings for some of her stories were first written down here, as told her by Gonzalo Moré and his wife Helba. The contrasts between her various emotional and sexual relationships as well as the fluctuations in each are very striking and clear.

Plot summary

Anaïs Nin continues her open marriage with Hugh Parker Guiler and her affairs with Henry Miller and Gonzalo Moré, under the shadow of the Spanish Revolution and the approach of World War II. She helps Gonzalo with his Communist and anti-Fascist activities, even though she believes more in literature and personal contact than in politics as a means of progress. Henry's work is already succeeding, and Anaïs's is starting to be published (of course, this will be interrupted by the war).

Sequel

The Swallow Press/Ohio University Press continued the publication of Anaïs Nin's unexpurgated diaries. In 2013, they published Mirages, which includes Nin's diaries from 1939 to 1947 and in 2017, they published Trapeze, which tells about years 1947 to 1955. [1]

Related Research Articles

Anaïs Nin French-American author (1903-1977)

Angela Anaïs Juana Antolina Rosa Edelmira Nin y Culmell, known professionally as Anaïs Nin, was a French-Cuban-American diarist, essayist, novelist and writer of short stories and erotica. Born to Cuban parents in France, Nin was the daughter of composer Joaquín Nin and Rosa Culmell, a classically trained singer. Nin spent her early years in Spain and Cuba, about sixteen years in Paris (1924–1940), and the remaining half of her life in the United States, where she became an established author.

Henry Miller American novelist

Henry Valentine Miller was an American writer and artist. He was known for breaking with existing literary forms and developing a new type of semi-autobiographical novel that blended character study, social criticism, philosophical reflection, stream of consciousness, explicit language, sex, surrealist free association, and mysticism. His most characteristic works of this kind are Tropic of Cancer, Black Spring, Tropic of Capricorn and The Rosy Crucifixion trilogy, which are based on his experiences in New York and Paris. He also wrote travel memoirs and literary criticism, and painted watercolors.

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<i>The Diary of Anaïs Nin</i> Book by Anaïs Nin

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<i>Henry and June</i>

Henry and June: From the Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin is a 1986 book that is based upon material excerpted from the unpublished diaries of Anaïs Nin. It corresponds temporally to the first volume of Nin's published diaries, written between October 1931 and October 1932, yet is radically different, in that that book begins with a description of the landscape of and around her home and never mentions her husband, whereas Henry and June begins with discussion of Nin's sex life and is full of her struggles and passionate relationship with husband Hugo, and then, as the novel/memoir progresses, other lovers.

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<i>Little Birds</i> (short story collection) Book by Anaïs Nin

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<i>Cities of the Interior</i> Book by Anaïs Nin

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<i>Incest: From a Journal of Love</i>

Incest: From a Journal of Love: The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin (1932–1934) is a 1992 non-fiction book by Anaïs Nin. It is a continuation of the diary entries first published in Henry and June: From the Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin. It features Nin's relationships with writer Henry Miller, his wife June Miller, the psychoanalyst Otto Rank, her father Joaquín Nin, and her husband Hugh Parker Guiler. She also copied some of her correspondence with these people into her diary. Much of this book was written in English, although those of her letters which were originally written in French and Spanish were translated. Most of this diary takes place in France, particularly Clichy, Paris and Louveciennes.

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<i>Mirages: The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin, 1939-1947</i>

Mirages: The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin, 1939-1947 is a volume of diary entries by Anaïs Nin from her life between 1939 and 1947, first published in 2013 by Swallow Press. It was edited by Paul Herron, and features an introduction by Kim Krizan.

<i>Trapeze: The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin, 1947–1955</i>

Trapeze: The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin, 1947–1955 is a volume of diary entries by Anaïs Nin from her life between 1947 and 1955, first published in 2017 by Swallow Press. It was edited by Paul Herron, and features an introduction by Benjamin Franklin V.

References

  1. Swallow Press/Ohio Press https://www.ohioswallow.com/author/Ana%C3%AFs+Nin . Retrieved 16 October 2021.Missing or empty |title= (help)