Nete (river)

Last updated
Nete

Grote Nete.jpg

Grote Nete
Country Belgium
Physical characteristics
Main source Lier
51°07′53″N4°34′53″E / 51.1315°N 4.5813°E / 51.1315; 4.5813
River mouth Rupel
51°04′25″N4°25′12″E / 51.0735°N 4.4201°E / 51.0735; 4.4201 Coordinates: 51°04′25″N4°25′12″E / 51.0735°N 4.4201°E / 51.0735; 4.4201
Length 98 km (61 mi) (Nete 13 km, Grote Nete 85 km)
Basin features
Progression RupelScheldtNorth Sea
Basin size 1,673 km2 (646 sq mi) [1] [2]
The Grote Nete near Heist-op-den-Berg De nete.jpg
The Grote Nete near Heist-op-den-Berg

The Nete (Dutch, in French: Nèthe) is a river in northern Belgium, right tributary of the Rupel. It flows through the Belgian province of Antwerp. It is formed in Lier, at the confluence of the rivers Grote Nete and Kleine Nete. It flows through Duffel and joins the river Dijle in Rumst to form the river Rupel. It drains nearly 60% of Antwerp province.

Dutch language West Germanic language

Dutch(Nederlands ) is a West Germanic language spoken by around 24 million people as a first language and 5 million people as a second language, constituting the majority of people in the Netherlands and Belgium. It is the third most widely spoken Germanic language, after its close relatives English and German.

French language Romance language

French is a Romance language of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages of Northern Roman Gaul like Gallia Belgica and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders. Today, owing to France's past overseas expansion, there are numerous French-based creole languages, most notably Haitian Creole. A French-speaking person or nation may be referred to as Francophone in both English and French.

River Natural flowing watercourse

A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river. In some cases a river flows into the ground and becomes dry at the end of its course without reaching another body of water. Small rivers can be referred to using names such as stream, creek, brook, rivulet, and rill. There are no official definitions for the generic term river as applied to geographic features, although in some countries or communities a stream is defined by its size. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; examples are "run" in some parts of the United States, "burn" in Scotland and northeast England, and "beck" in northern England. Sometimes a river is defined as being larger than a creek, but not always: the language is vague.

Contents

Grote Nete

The Grote Nete(Big Nete) river is about 85 km long [2] and has its source near Hechtel in the Belgian province of Limburg. It flows in western direction along the towns Geel, Westerlo and Heist-op-den-Berg before joining the Kleine Nete in Lier. Its main tributaries are the Molse Nete  (nl ) near Geel, the Grote Laak  (nl ; sv ) near Westerlo, and the Wimp  (nl ) near Herenthout.

Hechtel-Eksel Municipality in Flemish Community, Belgium

Hechtel-Eksel is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Limburg. On January 1, 2018, it had a total population of 12,290. The total area is 76.70 km² which gives a population density of 150 inhabitants per km².

Limburg (Belgium) Province of Belgium

Limburg is a province in Belgium. It is the easternmost of the five Dutch-speaking provinces that together form the Region of Flanders, one of the three main political and cultural sub-divisions of modern Belgium.

Geel Municipality in Flemish Community, Belgium

Geel is a city located in the Belgian province of Antwerp, which acquired city status in the 1980s. It comprises Central-Geel which is constituted of 4 old parishes a/o towns: Sint-Amand, Sint-Dimpna, Holven and Elsum. Further on around the center are the parish-towns of Ten Aard (N), Bel (E), Winkelomheide (SE), Stelen, Oosterlo and Zammel (S), Punt (SW) and Larum (W). On December 31, 2016, Geel had a total population of 39,535. The total area is 109.85 km2 (42 sq mi) which gives a population density of 320 inhabitants per km². Geel’s patron saint, the Irish Saint Dymphna, inspired the town’s pioneering de-institutionalized method of care for the mentally ill.

Kleine Nete

The Kleine Nete(Small Nete) river is about 50 km long [2] and has its source near Retie in the Belgian province of Antwerp. North of the Grote Nete flows in south-western direction along the towns Herentals and Nijlen before joining the Grote Nete in Lier. Tributaries, all coming from the North, include the Wamp  (nl ) near Kasterlee, the Aa  (nl )} near Grobbendonk, and the Molenbeek-Bollaak  (nl ) near Nijlen.

Retie Municipality in Flemish Community, Belgium

Retie is a municipality located in the Campine region of the Belgian province of Antwerp. The municipality comprises the town of Retie proper and several hamlets of which Schoonbroek is the largest. On 1 January 2012 Retie had a total population of 10,799. The total area is 48.39 km² which gives a population density of 213 inhabitants per square kilometre.

Herentals Municipality in Flemish Community, Belgium

Herentals is a city in the province of Antwerp. The municipality comprises the city of Herentals proper and the towns of Morkhoven and Noorderwijk. On January 1, 2006 Herentals had a total population of 26,071. The total area is 48.56 km2 (18.75 sq mi) which gives a population density of 537 inhabitants per km². Saint Waltrude is the patron saint of the city.

History

During the French occupation of the Southern Netherlands (1792–1815) there was a département named after the river Nete, see Deux-Nèthes.

Southern Netherlands historical region in Belgium

The Southern Netherlands, also called the Catholic Netherlands, was the part of the Low Countries largely controlled by Spain (1556–1714), later Austria (1714–1794), and occupied then annexed by France (1794–1815). The region also included a number of smaller states that were never ruled by Spain or Austria: the Prince-Bishopric of Liège, the Imperial Abbey of Stavelot-Malmedy, the County of Bouillon, the County of Horne and the Princely Abbey of Thorn. The Southern Netherlands were part of the Holy Roman Empire until the whole area was annexed by Revolutionary France.

In the administrative divisions of France, the department is one of the three levels of government below the national level, between the administrative regions and the commune. Ninety-six departments are in metropolitan France, and five are overseas departments, which are also classified as regions. Departments are further subdivided into 334 arrondissements, themselves divided into cantons; the last two have no autonomy, and are used for the organisation of police, fire departments, and sometimes, elections.

Deux-Nèthes former French department (1795-1814)

Deux-Nèthes was a department of the First French Empire in present-day Belgium and the Netherlands. It was named after two branches of the river Nete. The southern part of its territory corresponds more or less with the present-day Belgian province of Antwerp.

Natural landscapes

On the valley of the Grote Nete lies the Scheps natural landscape, between Olmen and Scheps.

Scheps is a natural landscape in the municipality of Balen, Antwerp Province, Belgium.

Natural landscape landscape that is unaffected by human activity

A natural landscape is the original landscape that exists before it is acted upon by human culture. The natural landscape and the cultural landscape are separate parts of the landscape. However, in the twenty-first century landscapes that are totally untouched by human activity no longer exist, so that reference is sometimes now made to degrees of naturalness within a landscape.

Olmen is a village that lies in Belgium, in the province of Antwerp. The village is part of the town Balen.

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Antwerp Province Province of Belgium

Antwerp Province is the northernmost province both of the Flemish Region, also called Flanders, and of Belgium. It borders on North Brabant province of the Netherlands and the Belgian provinces of Limburg, Flemish Brabant and East Flanders. Its capital is Antwerp which comprises the Port of Antwerp. It has an area of 2,867 km2 (1,107 sq mi) and with 1.8 million inhabitants it is the country's most populous province. The province consists of 3 arrondissements: Antwerp, Mechelen and Turnhout. The eastern part of the province comprises the main part of the Campine region.

Scheldt river in France, Belgium and the Netherlands

The Scheldt is a 350-kilometre (220 mi) long river in northern France, western Belgium, and the southwestern part of the Netherlands. Its name is derived from an adjective corresponding to Old English sceald ("shallow"), Modern English shoal, Low German schol, West Frisian skol, and Swedish (obsolete) skäll ("thin").

Rumst Municipality in Flemish Community, Belgium

Rumst is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Antwerp. Since 1976 the municipality not only comprises Rumst proper but also the towns of Reet and Terhagen, which were independent municipalities before that year.

Kasterlee Municipality in Flemish Community, Belgium

Kasterlee is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Antwerp. The municipality comprises the towns of Kasterlee proper, Lichtaart and Tielen. On January 1, 2006 Kasterlee had a total population of 17,908. The total area is 71.56 km² which gives a population density of 250 inhabitants per km². The town is twinned with Plaffeien.

Siege of Antwerp (1914) engagement between the German and the Belgian armies during World War I

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Boom, Belgium Municipality in Flemish Community, Belgium

Boom is a Belgian town, located in both the arrondissement and province of Antwerp. On 1 January 2006 Boom had a total population of 16,096. The total area is 7.37 km² which gives a population density of 2,185 inhabitants per km². Residents are known as "Boomenaars".

Lier, Belgium Municipality in Flemish Community, Belgium

Lier is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Antwerp. It is composed of the city of Lier proper and the village of Koningshooikt. The city center is surrounded by the river Nete, which also cuts through it. Per January 1, 2010 Lier had a total population of 33,930. The total area is 49.70 km² which amounts to a population density of 669 inhabitants per km². Lier is known for its beers, its patron saint St. Gummarus and Lierse vlaaikes cake. It is also home to the world headquarters of Van Hool, a global bus and coach manufacturer. Lier's two principal football clubs are K. Lyra-Lierse and Lierse Kempenzonen.

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Dyle (river) river in central Belgium

The Dyle, is a river in central Belgium, left tributary of the Rupel. It is 86 kilometres (53 mi) long. It flows through the Belgian provinces of Walloon Brabant, Flemish Brabant and Antwerp. Its source is in Houtain-le-Val, near Nivelles in Walloon Brabant.

Rupel small river in Belgium

The Rupel is a tidal river in northern Belgium, right tributary of the Scheldt. It is about 12 kilometres (7 mi) long. It flows through the Belgian province of Antwerp. It is formed by the confluence of the rivers Dijle and Nete, in Rumst. It flows into the Scheldt at Schelle. Towns along the Rupel are Rumst, Boom, Niel and Schelle. The Rupel is navigable, and forms part of the waterway to Brussels.

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Gete river in Belgium

The Gete is a river in Belgium which flows south to north. It is a left tributary of the Demer.

Kessel is a town in the Province of Antwerp in Belgium. In 2006, the population was 7,207 inhabitants. Although officially part of a larger town region, Nijlen, Kessel is very famous on itself for its many touristic attractions, such as "de Kesselse Heide" and "Fort Kessel".

Heindonk is a Belgian village in the municipality of Willebroek, Antwerp province, situated northwest of the city of Mechelen.

Lichtaart Village

Lichtaart is a village in Belgium, in the province of Antwerp and municipality of Kasterlee. The village is situated near the town, Antwerp. Lichtaart bordered by the Rivers, Nete and Kaliebeek. In 1977, Lichtaart had an area of 25 km ² and had 4229 inhabitants. Lichtaart is notable for the theme park, Bobbejaanland and the folk singer, Bobbejaan Schoepen.

The 2018–19 Belgian First Amateur Division is the third season of the third-tier football league in Belgium, as it was established in 2016. The fixtures are scheduled to be announced near the end of June 2018.

References

  1. Het Netebekken
  2. 1 2 3 Ingrid Baten & Willy Huybrechts, De historische bedding van de bevaarbare Nete, 2002, page 7