Nevada Assembly

Last updated

Nevada Assembly
Nevada Legislature
Seal of Nevada.svg
Type
Type
Term limits
6 terms (12 years)
History
Preceded by78th Nevada Legislature
Leadership
Speaker of the Nevada Assembly
Jason Frierson (D)
since February 6, 2017
Majority Floor Leader
Teresa Benitez-Thompson (D)
since November 9, 2016
Minority Leader
Robin L. Titus (R)
since June 4, 2019
Structure
Seats42
Nevada Assembly.svg
Political groups
Majority
  •    Democratic  (29)

Minority

Length of term
2 years
AuthorityArticle 4, Constitution of Nevada
Salary$146.90/day + per diem
Elections
Last election
November 6, 2018
(42 seats)
Next election
November 3, 2020
(42 seats)
RedistrictingLegislative control
Meeting place
Nevada State Assembly.jpg
Assembly Chamber
Legislative Building
Carson City, Nevada
Website
Nevada State Assembly

Coordinates: 39°09′42″N119°45′58″W / 39.161643°N 119.766139°W / 39.161643; -119.766139 The Nevada Assembly is the lower house of the Nevada Legislature, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Nevada, the upper house being the Nevada Senate. The body consists of 42 members, elected to two-year terms from single-member districts. Each district contained approximately 64,299 people as of the 2010 United States Census. [1] Term limits, limiting assembly members to six 2-year terms (12 years), took effect in 2010. Twelve members of the Nevada Assembly were termed out with the 2010 election serving their last legislative session in 2011.

Contents

The Nevada Assembly met at the Nevada State Capitol in Carson City until 1971, when a separate Legislative Building was constructed south of the Capitol. The Legislative Building was expanded in 1997 to its current appearance to accommodate the growing Nevada Legislature. Since the 2012 session, Assembly districts have been formed by dividing the 21 Senate districts in half, so that each Assembly district is nested within a Senate district.

Next elections will be held November 3.

Meetings

The Assembly, like the Senate, is composed of citizen legislators, receiving a relatively small ($130) per diem fee for the first 60 days of a given session. This tends to self-selection, with legislative service difficult for those without flexible jobs and/or large outside incomes, such as doctors and lawyers. The Assembly, again like the Senate, meets however long is necessary for the completion of all its business, up to a maximum of 120 days, beginning the first Monday in February of every odd-numbered year. While this is designed to limit the amount of time a legislator is away from their first job, in recent years 120 days has often not been enough time to complete legislative business, and after four straight regular sessions, special sessions had been called to finish up legislative business. This trend ended in 2011, which was not followed by a special session.

Leadership of the Assembly

The Speaker of the Assembly presides over the Assembly in the chief leadership position, controlling the flow of legislation and committee assignments. The Speaker is elected by the majority party caucus, followed by confirmation of the full Assembly on passage of a floor vote. Other Assembly leaders, such as the majority and minority leaders, are elected by their respective party caucuses according to each party's strength in the chamber.

Assembly Chamber

The Nevada Assembly convenes in the south chamber of the Legislative Building. The carpet in the Assembly chamber is mainly red, in comparison to the Senate chamber, which is blue. The chamber galleries reflect the same carpet schemes. Many legislative documents and binders are colored red and blue to distinguish them between the Assembly and the Senate. Although the chamber is separated by a center aisle, the Assemblymen are not seated by party. Rather they are seated at the discretion of the Speaker. The Speaker's desk is always the first desk in the front row to the right, if you are looking out at the chamber from the Speaker's rostrum. Above the Speaker is a large gavel, which is engraved with the name of Speaker Joe Dini; the longest serving Speaker of the Nevada Assembly. Above the gavel is a portrait of Abraham Lincoln, who was President when Nevada became a State in 1864. To the left of the main door to the chamber is a podium with a Bible, which is changed to different passages by the Assembly Sargeant-at-Arms.

Since 2003, one floor session has always been held in the Old Assembly Chambers in the State Capitol. The session usually begins with a presentation from the State Archivist regarding the history of the chamber, and then legislative business proceeds as usual. Because there are no screens or voting equipment in the old chamber, all business is hand-written on a chalk board, as it would have been done when the Assembly still met in the Capitol.

All joint-meetings and joint-sessions are held in the Assembly chamber, including the State of the State Address, the State of the Judiciary Address, and addresses from Nevada's federal delegation. Unlike in Congress, where the Speaker of the House presides over all joint-meetings and sessions (except when Congress counts the Electoral Votes after a Presidential election), the President of the Senate presides over joint-meetings and sessions instead of the Speaker of the Assembly.

Composition

2913
DemocraticRepublican
AffiliationParty
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Lib Republican Vacant
Begin 77th
February 2013
27015420
End 77th
November 2014
2514393
Begin 78th
February 2015
17025420
End 78th
November 2016
124420
Begin 79th
February 2017
27015420
September 22, 2017 [2]
14411
End 79th
November 2018
Begin 80th
February 2019
29013420
May 4, 2019 [3] 28411
Latest voting share

Leadership of the Assembly

The Speaker of the Assembly presides over the Assembly in the chief leadership position, controlling the flow of legislation and committee assignments. The Speaker is elected by the majority party caucus, followed by confirmation of the full Assembly on passage of a floor vote. Other Assembly leaders, such as the majority and minority leaders, are elected by their respective party caucuses according to each party's strength in the chamber.

PositionNamePartyDistrict
Speaker Jason Frierson Democratic8
Speaker pro tempore Steve Yeager Democratic9
Majority Leader Teresa Benitez-Thompson Democratic27
Assistant Majority Floor Leader Daniele Monroe-Moreno Democratic1
Majority Whip Vacant
Assistant Majority Whip William McCurdy II Democratic6
Heidi Swank Democratic16
Minority Leader Robin L. Titus Republican38
Co-Deputy Minority Leader (North) Jill Tolles Republican25
Co-Deputy Minority Leader (South) Tom Roberts Republican13
Minority Whip Lisa Krasner Republican26
Deputy Minority Whip (North)Vacant
Deputy Minority Whip (South) Chris Edwards Republican19

Members

DistrictNamePartyResidenceFirst elected/appointedTerm
1 Daniele Monroe-Moreno Democratic North Las Vegas 20162nd
2 Heidi Kasama Republican Las Vegas 20201st
3 Selena Torres Democratic Las Vegas 20181st
4 Richard McArthur RepublicanLas Vegas20084th
5 Brittney Miller DemocraticLas Vegas20162nd
6 Shondra Summers-Armstrong DemocraticLas Vegas20201st
7 Cameron Miller DemocraticNorth Las Vegas20201st
8 Jason Frierson DemocraticLas Vegas20104th
9 Steve Yeager DemocraticLas Vegas20162nd
10 Rochelle Nguyen DemocraticLas Vegas20181st
11 Bea Duran Democratic North Las Vegas 2018†1st
12 Susie Martinez DemocraticLas Vegas20181st
13 Tom Roberts RepublicanLas Vegas20181st
14 Maggie Carlton Democratic Sunrise Manor 20104th
15 Howard Watts III DemocraticLas Vegas20181st
16 Cecelia González Democratic Las Vegas 20201st
17 Clara Thomas Democratic20201st
18 Venicia Considine DemocraticLas Vegas20201st
19 Annie Black Republican Mesquite 20201st
20 David Orentlicher DemocraticLas Vegas20201st
21 Elaine Marzola Democratic20201st
22 Melissa Hardy RepublicanHenderson20162nd
23 Glen Leavitt Republican Boulder City 20181st
24 Sarah Peters Democratic Reno 20181st
25 Jill Tolles RepublicanReno20162nd
26 Lisa Krasner RepublicanReno20162nd
27 Teresa Benitez-Thompson Democratic Reno 20105th
28 Edgar Flores Democratic Las Vegas 20143rd
29 Lesley Cohen DemocraticHenderson20123rd
30 Natha Anderson Democratic Sparks 20201st
31 Jill Dickman RepublicanSparks20202nd
32 Alexis Hansen RepublicanSparks20181st
33 John Ellison Republican Elko 20105th
34 Shannon Bilbray-Axelrod DemocraticLas Vegas20162nd
35 Michelle Gorelow DemocraticLas Vegas20181st
36 Gregory Hafen II Republican Pahrump 2018†1st
37 Andy Matthews RepublicanLas Vegas20201st
38 Robin L. Titus Republican Wellington 20143rd
39 Jim Wheeler Republican Minden 20124th
40 P. K. O'Neill Republican Carson City 20162nd
41 Sandra Jauregui DemocraticLas Vegas20162nd
42 Alexander Assefa DemocraticLas Vegas20181st

Past composition of the Assembly

See also

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References

  1. "Nevada State Assembly - 2011 Districts : Population Report" (PDF). Leg.state.nv.us. Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  2. Republican Paul Anderson (District 13) resigned to take another job.
  3. Democrat Tyrone Thompson (District 17) died.