Nevados de Chillán

Last updated
Nevados de Chillán
Valle Las Trancas.jpg
Las Trancas Valley.
Highest point
Elevation 3,212 m (10,538 ft)
Coordinates 36°51′48″S71°22′36″W / 36.86333°S 71.37667°W / -36.86333; -71.37667
Geography
Relief Map of Chile.jpg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Nevados de Chillán
Location of Nevados de Chillán
in Chile
Location Chile
Parent range Andes
Geology
Mountain type Stratovolcanoes
Volcanic arc/belt South Volcanic Zone
Last eruption 2016

Nevados de Chillán is a group of stratovolcanoes located in the Andes of the Bío Bío Region, Chile, and is one of the most active volcanoes in the region. It consists of three overlapping peaks, 3,212 m (10,538 ft) Cerro Blanco (Volcán Nevado) at the northwest and 3,089 m (10,135 ft) Volcán Viejo (Volcán Chillán) at the southeast, with Volcán Nuevo in the middle. Volcán Viejo was the main active vent during the 17th-19th centuries, and the new Volcán Nuevo lava dome complex formed between 1906 and 1945, eventually growing to exceed Viejo in height by the mid 1980s.

This complex contains two subcomplexes: Cerro Blanco and Las Termas. The subcomplex Cerro Blanco includes the volcanoes Santa Gertrudis, Gato, Cerro Blanco, Colcura, Calfú Pichicalfú and Baños. The subcomplex Las Termas includes the volcanoes Shangri-La, Nuevo, Arrau, Viejo, Chillán y Pata de Perro. In addition, near of the complex there are two pyroclastic satellite cones, the volcanoes Las Lagunillas and Parador. [1]

Aerial view of the Nevados de Chillan chain. Left to right: Volcan Nevado, Volcan Nuevo, Volcan Chillan. The Volcan Arrau dome complex (1973-1986) can be seen as a sharp cone-shape in front of the Volcan Nevado. Nevados de Chillan volcanic group.jpg
Aerial view of the Nevados de Chillán chain. Left to right: Volcán Nevado, Volcán Nuevo, Volcán Chillán. The Volcán Arrau dome complex (1973-1986) can be seen as a sharp cone-shape in front of the Volcán Nevado.

See also

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References

  1. Naranjo, JA; Gilbert, Jennie S; Sparks, Rachel SJ (2008). Geología del Complejo Volcánico Nevados de Chillán, Región del Biobío (PDF). GEOLOGÍA BÁSICA (in Spanish). Andros Impresores.