New England Highway

Last updated

New England Highway

New South Wales
Location New England Hwy.svg
General information
Type Highway
Length878 km (546 mi) [1]
Route number(s)
Former
route number
Major junctions
North end
 
South end
Location(s)
Major settlements Crows Nest, Toowoomba, Warwick, Tenterfield, Glen Innes, Armidale, Tamworth, Muswellbrook, Maitland
Highway system

The New England Highway is an 878-kilometre (546 mi) long [1] highway in Australia running from Hexham at Newcastle, New South Wales at its southern end to Yarraman, north of Toowoomba, Queensland at its northern end. It is part of Australia's National Highway system, and forms part of the inland route between Brisbane and Sydney. [2]

Highway A public road or other public way on land

A highway is any public or private road or other public way on land. It is used for major roads, but also includes other public roads and public tracks: It is not an equivalent term to controlled-access highway, or a translation for autobahn, autoroute, etc.

Australia Country in Oceania

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania, and numerous smaller islands. It is the largest country in Oceania and the world's sixth-largest country by total area. The neighbouring countries are Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, and East Timor to the north; the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu to the north-east; and New Zealand to the south-east. The population of 25 million is highly urbanised and heavily concentrated on the eastern seaboard. Australia's capital is Canberra, and its largest city is Sydney. The country's other major metropolitan areas are Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, and Adelaide.

Hexham, New South Wales Suburb of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia

Hexham is a suburb of the city of Newcastle, about 15 km (9 mi) inland from the Newcastle CBD in New South Wales, Australia on the bank of the Hunter River.

Contents

Route description

At its southern end the New England Highway connects to the Pacific Highway and at its northern end it connects to the D'Aguilar Highway. It traverses the Hunter Valley, New England, and the Southern and Darling Downs regions.

DAguilar Highway highway in Queensland

The D'Aguilar Highway is a two-lane highway linking the Bruce Highway near Caboolture with Kingaroy in the state of Queensland, Australia. Major towns along the route include Woodford, Kilcoy, Blackbutt, Yarraman, Nanango and Kingaroy. The highway is approximately 164 km (102 mi) in length. The D'Aguilar Highway's highest elevation along its length is 527m just north of Yarraman, and the lowest point is at 26.8m just west of Caboolture.

Hunter Region Region in New South Wales, Australia

The Hunter Region, also commonly known as the Hunter Valley, is a region of New South Wales, Australia, extending from approximately 120 km (75 mi) to 310 km (193 mi) north of Sydney. It contains the Hunter River and its tributaries with highland areas to the north and south. Situated at the northern end of the Sydney Basin bioregion, the Hunter Valley is one of the largest river valleys on the NSW coast, and is most commonly known for its wineries and coal industry.

Darling Downs Region in Queensland, Australia

The Darling Downs is a farming region on the western slopes of the Great Dividing Range in southern Queensland, Australia. The Downs are to the west of South East Queensland and are one of the major regions of Queensland. The name was generally applied to an area approximating to that of the Condamine River catchment upstream of Condamine township but is now applied to a wider region comprising the Southern Downs, Western Downs, Toowoomba and Goondiwindi local authority areas. The name Darling Downs was given in 1827 by Allan Cunningham, the first European explorer to reach the area and recognises the then Governor of New South Wales, Ralph Darling.

During the winter months, some parts of the New England Highway are subject to frost and snowfall [3] [4] , with the 350 km section from the Moonbi Ranges to Stanthorpe located at high altitudes.

Stanthorpe, Queensland Town in Queensland, Australia

Stanthorpe is a town situated in south east Queensland, Australia. The town lies on the New England Highway near the New South Wales border 223 kilometres (139 mi) from Brisbane via Warwick, 56 kilometres (35 mi) north of Tenterfield and 811 m above sea level. The area surrounding the town is known as the Granite Belt. At the 2016 census, Stanthorpe had an urban population of almost 5,000.

Traffic volume

In 2013-14, the New England Highway and Cunningham Highway combined (known as the Sydney-Brisbane inland route) had an average annual daily traffic count of just over 13,000 vehicles, which is approximately half that seen on the coastal route (i.e., the Pacific Highway and Pacific Motorway). [2] Heavy vehicles account for approximately 13% of the traffic seen on the route. [2]

Cunningham Highway highway in Queensland

The Cunningham Highway is a 327-kilometre (203 mi) national highway located in south-eastern Queensland, Australia. The highway links the Darling Downs region with the urbanised outskirts of Ipswich via Cunninghams Gap.

Pacific Highway (Australia) highway in New South Wales and Queensland

The Pacific Highway is a 790-kilometre-long (490 mi) national highway and major transport route along the central east coast of Australia, with the majority of it being part of Australia's national route 1.

Pacific Motorway (Brisbane–Brunswick Heads) motorway in New South Wales and Queensland

The Pacific Motorway is a motorway in Australia between Brisbane, Queensland, and Brunswick Heads, New South Wales, through the New South Wales–Queensland border at Tweed Heads.

Speed cameras

As of November 2018, fixed speed cameras were located at Ben Lomond (between Ross Road and Ben Lomond Road), Blandford (between Hayles Street and Mills Street) and Tenterfield (between Duncan Street and George Street). [5] Average speed enforcement (point-to-point) cameras target heavy vehicles between Singleton and Muswellbrook. [6] [7]

Traffic enforcement camera automated ticketing machine

A traffic enforcement camera is a camera which may be mounted beside or over a road or installed in an enforcement vehicle to detect motoring offenses, including speeding, vehicles going through a red traffic light, vehicles going through a toll booth without paying, unauthorized use of a bus lane, or for recording vehicles inside a congestion charge area. It may be linked to an automated ticketing system.

Ben Lomond Scottish mountain

Ben Lomond, 974 metres (3,196 ft), is a mountain in the Scottish Highlands. Situated on the eastern shore of Loch Lomond, it is the most southerly of the Munros. Ben Lomond lies within the Ben Lomond National Memorial Park and the Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park, property of the National Trust for Scotland.

From Brisbane, National Highway 15 (green) follows the Cunningham Highway until Warwick where it then follows southwards, the New England Highway ... Pacific.hwy.nth.jpg
From Brisbane, National Highway 15 (green) follows the Cunningham Highway until Warwick where it then follows southwards, the New England Highway ...
... through Armidale, Tamworth, Maitland and Hexham where it joins the Pacific Highway Pacific.hwy.sth.jpg
... through Armidale, Tamworth, Maitland and Hexham where it joins the Pacific Highway

History

The New England Highway has its origins in the track which developed north from Newcastle to reach the prime wool growing areas of the New England region which Europeans settled following expeditions by NSW Surveyor-General John Oxley in 1818 and botanist Allan Cunningham in 1827 and 1829.[ citation needed ] The rough track, navigable only by horse or bullock dray, crossed the Liverpool Range, went through Tamworth and ended at Tenterfield. [8] The track became known as the Great Northern Road. [9] During the 1860s, several robberies occurred along the road [10] [11] , with infamous bushranger Captain Thunderbolt known to be active in the area. [12]

New England (New South Wales) Region in New South Wales, Australia

New England or New England North West is the name given to a generally undefined region in the north of the state of New South Wales, Australia about 60 kilometres (37 miles) inland, that includes the Northern Tablelands and the North West Slopes regions.

John Oxley British explorer

John Joseph William Molesworth Oxley was an explorer and surveyor of Australia in the early period of British colonisation. He served as Surveyor General of New South Wales and is perhaps best known for his two expeditions into the interior of New South Wales and his discoveries of the Tweed River and the Brisbane River in what is now the state of Queensland.

Allan Cunningham (botanist) British botanist

Allan Cunningham was an English botanist and explorer, primarily known for his travels in Australia to collect plants.

When the NSW main road system was reorganised in August 1928, the Great Northern Road was gazetted as part of state highway 9 and renamed the Great Northern Highway [13] . At proclamation, the Great Northern Highway was described as stretching from North Sydney to the Queensland border at Mount Lindesay, via Newcastle, Maitland, Tamworth, Armidale, Tenterfield and Woodenbong. [13] The route became known as the New England Highway in early-1933 by combining the Great Northern Highway and the Brisbane-Mount Lindesay-Warwick Highway into a single uniformly-named road from Hexham to Brisbane. [14] [15] In 1936 the road was described by contemporary observers as being in good condition, with spectacular scenery and excellent accommodation en route. [16] [17]

In 1954 the New England Highway was re-routed through Warwick along the route that was then known as the Lockyer-Darling Downs Highway. [18] Against the wishes of the Beaudesert Shire Council and the Woodenbong Chamber of Commerce [19] , the former New England Highway through Beaudesert was renamed the Mount Lindesay Highway. [20]

In the 1970s, the Queensland Main Roads Department rerouted the designation of the New England Highway north of Warwick to follow the former Lockyer-Darling Downs Highway (national route 17) so that it terminated in Toowoomba.[ citation needed ] The section of the highway between Brisbane and Warwick was renamed as part of the Cunningham Highway, which until that time had extended only westward from Warwick to Goondiwindi.[ citation needed ]

Intersection of New England Highway and Golden Highway between Branxton and Singleton NewEnglandAndGoldenHighwaySigns.JPG
Intersection of New England Highway and Golden Highway between Branxton and Singleton
Thunderbolts Rocks, New England Highway (south of Uralla), where Thunderbolt conducted some of his robberies. Thunderbolts Rocks.JPG
Thunderbolts Rocks, New England Highway (south of Uralla), where Thunderbolt conducted some of his robberies.
Statue of Captain Thunderbolt at the intersection of New England Highway and Thunderbolts Way, Uralla, NSW Thunderbolt.JPG
Statue of Captain Thunderbolt at the intersection of New England Highway and Thunderbolts Way, Uralla, NSW

Highway improvements

As of October 2018, completed, current or proposed improvements on the New England Highway include [21] :

Former allocations

Major junctions

StateLGA / LGALocationkm [1] miDestinationsNotes
Queensland Toowoomba Yarraman 00.0AUS Alphanumeric Route A3.svg D'Aguilar Highway (A3)  Nanango, Goomeri, Biloela
AUS Alphanumeric Route A17.svg D'Aguilar Highway (A17)  Caboolture, Esk, Ipswich
T intersection northern terminus; north (A3) and southeast (A17) as the D'Aguilar Highway
Wutul 3321Australian state route 68.svg Oakey Cooyar Road (SR68)  Oakey T intersection; New England Highway continues southeast
Crows Nest Creek7446Bridge over the river (no known name)
Toowoomba Hampton 8653Australian state route 85.svg Esk Hampton Road (SR85)  Esk Four-way intersection; northern concurrency terminus as Australian state route 85.svg; New England Highway continues south
Toowoomba 11873Australian national highway A2.svg Warrego Highway (A2)  Gatton, Ipswich Four-way intersection; eastern concurrency terminus as Australian national highway A2.svgAustralian state route 85.svg; New England Highway continues west
11974Australian national highway A2.svg Warrego Highway (A2)  Dalby Four-way intersection; western concurrency terminus as Australian national highway A2.svg; New England Highway continues south
AUS Alphanumeric Route A39.svgAustralian state route 85.svg Gore Highway (A39) (SR85)  Goondiwindi Four-way intersection; southern concurrency terminus as Australian state route 85.svg; New England Highway continues south
Cambooya 13383Drayton Connection Road  Drayton, Toowoomba Y intersection; New England Highway continues south
13785Australian state route 48.svg Cambooya Connection Road (SR48)  Karara T intersection; New England Highway continues south
Clifton 162101Australian state route 80.svg Gatton Cliftonn Road (SR80)  Gatton T intersection; New England Highway continues south
Southern Downs Glengallan 188117Australian national highway 15.svg Cunningham Highway (A15)  Ipswich, Warwick Directional T interchange; southern terminus as AUS Alphanumeric Route A3.svg; northern concurrency terminus as Australian national highway 15.svgAustralian national route 42.svg; New England Highway and Cunningham Highway continues south
Condamine River 199124 O.O. Madsen Bridge
Southern Downs Warwick 202126Australian national route 42.svg Cunningham Highway (42)  Goondiwindi 4-way intersection; southern terminus as Australian national route 42.svg; New England Highway continus south
Stanthorpe 13785Wallangarra Road  Stanthorpe to Australian state route 89.svgDirectional T interchange; New England Highway continues south
Queensland – New South Wales state border299186Queensland – New South Wales state border
New South Wales Tenterfield Tenterfield 313194 Bruxner Highway (no shield)  Boggabilla Uncontrolled 4-way intersection; northern concurrency terminus; New England Highway continues south
318198Australian state route 80.svg Bruxner Highway (SR80)   Casino, Lismore, Ballina Uncontrolled 4-way intersection; southern concurrency terminus; New England Highway continues south
Deepwater River 370230Bridge over the river (no known name)
Glen Innes Severn Glen Innes 409254New South Wales alphanumeric route B76.svg Gwydir Highway (B76)  Inverell, Warialda, Moree Uncontrolled 4-way intersection; northern concurrency terminus; New England Highway continues south
New South Wales alphanumeric route B76.svg Gwydir Highway (B76)  Grafton Uncontrolled 4-way intersection; southern concurrency terminus; New England Highway continues south
Armidale Armidale 511318New South Wales alphanumeric route B78.svg Waterfall Way (B78)  Raleigh Roundabout; New England Highway continues south
Bendemeer 576358New South Wales alphanumeric route B56.svg Oxley Highway (B56)  Walcha, Wauchope, Port Macquarie T intersection; northern concurrency terminus as New South Wales alphanumeric route B56.svg; New England Highway continues south
Tamworth Tamworth 616383New South Wales alphanumeric route B56.svg Oxley Highway (B56)  Gunnedah, Coonabarabran to New South Wales alphanumeric route B95.svg Manilla Road (B95)  Manilla, Warialda Roundabout; southern concurrency terminus as New South Wales alphanumeric route B56.svg; New England Highway continues south
Peel River 613381Bridge over the river (no known name)
Liverpool Plains Willow Tree 684425New South Wales alphanumeric route B51.svg Kamilaroi Highway (B51)  Gunnedah, Narrabri, Walgett, Bourke Directional T interchange; New England Highway continues south
Pages River 703437Bridge over the river (no known name)
Pages River707439Bridge over the river (no known name)
Pages River710440Bridge over the river (no known name)
Hunter River 755469 Fitzgerald [22] Bridge
Muswellbrook Muswellbrook 769478Denman Road  Denman T intersection; New England Highway continues southeast
Hunter River815506Bridge over the river (no known name)
Singleton Whittingham 827514New South Wales alphanumeric route B84.svg Golden Highway (B84)  Denman, Merriwa, Dunedoo, Dubbo T intersection; New England Highway continues southeast
Belford 835519New South Wales alphanumeric route M15.svg Hunter Expressway (M15)  West Wallsend, Newcastle T intersection; New South Wales alphanumeric route A15.svg transitions to New South Wales alphanumeric route M15.svg; incomplete access to/from the New England Highway (no shield) as it continues east
Branxton 838521New South Wales alphanumeric route B82.svg Clift Street to Wine Country Drive (B82)  Rothbury, Pokolbin, Cessnock T intersection; New England Highway (no shield) continues east
840520New South Wales alphanumeric route A43.svgunnamed road (A43) to New South Wales alphanumeric route M15.svg Hunter Expressway (M15)  Singleton, Newcastle Y intersection; New England Highway transitions to New South Wales alphanumeric route A43.svg and continues southeast
Maitland Maitland 862536Cessnock Road  Kurri Kurri, Cessnock Roundabout; New England Highway continues southeast
Newcastle Tarro 875544New South Wales alphanumeric route A1.svg John Renshaw Drive (A1)  Raymond Terrace, Taree, Kempsey, Coffs Harbour, Brisbane Directional T interchange; incomplete northwest concurrency terminus as New South Wales alphanumeric route A1.svg; New England Highway continues southeast
Hexham 879546New South Wales alphanumeric route A1.svg Pacific Highway (A1)  Newcastle, Raymond Terrace, Taree, Kempsey, Brisbane Directional T interchange; southeast concurrency terminus as New South Wales alphanumeric route A1.svg; southeastern terminus; continues east and north as the Pacific Highway
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Cities and towns

From its junction with the Pacific Highway at Hexham, 12 km (7 mi) inland from Newcastle the New England Highway connects the following cities and towns:

New South Wales

Queensland

See also

Related Research Articles

Tenterfield, New South Wales Town in New South Wales, Australia

Tenterfield is a regional town in New South Wales, Australia. At the 2016 census, Tenterfield had a population of approximately 4,000. Tenterfield's proximity to many regional centres and its position on the route between Sydney and Brisbane led to its development as a centre for the promotion of the federation of the Australian colonies.

Hunter River (New South Wales) river

The Hunter River is a major river in New South Wales, Australia. The Hunter River rises in the Liverpool Range and flows generally south and then east, reaching the Tasman Sea at Newcastle, the second largest city in New South Wales and a major harbour port. Its lower reaches form an open and trained mature wave dominated barrier estuary.

Mount Lindesay Highway highway in Queensland

The Mount Lindesay Highway is an Australian national highway located in Queensland, also known as National Route 13. The highway runs southwest from Brisbane, where it leaves Ipswich Road in the suburb of Moorooka, to the Queensland – New South Wales border and is approximately 116 kilometres (72 mi) in length. For most of its length it is roughly aligned with the Sydney–Brisbane rail corridor. At its southern end these transport routes take different passes over the Scenic Rim into the Northern Rivers region.

The Summerland Way is a 199–kilometre state route, designated B91, in New South Wales. It runs generally north from Grafton to the border between NSW and Queensland just west of Mount Lindesay. The road continues from there into Queensland as Mount Lindesay Highway. With the decommissioning of the Mount Lindesay Highway in New South Wales in 1982, the length of the Summerland Way was increased by 9.4 km to the Queensland border. It is sealed for its entire length, although some of the road north of the Lions Road turn-off is narrow and winding. In 1996, the Federal Government committed $20 million toward upgrading the Summerland Way. A $7 million contract to realign 1.2 km at Dourrigan's Gap, approximately 16 km north of Kyogle, was awarded, with work starting in February 2002 and expected to take 12 months to complete.

Main North railway line, New South Wales railway line in New South Wales, Australia

The Main North Line is a major railway in New South Wales, Australia. It runs through the Central Coast, Hunter and New England regions. The line was the original main line between Sydney and Brisbane, however this required a change of gauge at Wallangarra. As of 1988, the line closed progressively north of Armidale with services gradually withdrawn till 2004, with the main route between Sydney and Brisbane now the North Coast line.

Mount Lindesay (Queensland) locality in Scenic Rim, Queensland, Australia

Mount Lindesay is a mountain and locality within the Scenic Rim Region, Queensland, Australia.

Singleton railway station, New South Wales railway station at Singleton, New South Wales, Australia

Singleton railway station is a heritage-listed railway station located on the Main Northern line in New South Wales, Australia. It serves the town of Singleton. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.

Hunter Line rail service in the Hunter Region, New South Wales, Australia

The Hunter Line is a NSW TrainLink passenger train service that operates from Newcastle to Dungog and Scone in the New South Wales Hunter Region. It operates on the Newcastle, Main North and North Coast lines.

Pacific Motorway (Sydney–Newcastle) motorway in New South Wales

The M1 Pacific Motorway, also known by the former names F3 Freeway, Sydney–Newcastle Freeway, and Sydney–Newcastle Expressway; is a 127 km (79 mi) stretch of freeway linking Sydney to the Central Coast, Newcastle and Hunter regions of New South Wales. It is part of the AusLink road corridor between Sydney and Brisbane. The name "F3 Freeway", reflects its former route allocation, but is commonly used by both the public and the government to refer to the roadway long after the route allocation itself was no longer in use.

Liston, New South Wales Town in New South Wales, Australia

Liston is a small mountain village in northern New South Wales, Australia in Tenterfield Shire local government area. It lies just inside the eastern boundary of the New South Wales, Queensland border on the old Cobb & Co route, now the Mount Lindesay Highway, which used to extend from Brisbane to Tenterfield, New South Wales.

Maitland railway station

Maitland railway station is located on the Main Northern line in New South Wales, Australia. It serves the city of Maitland opening on in 1880 as West Maitland being renamed on 1 April 1949. It is the junction station for the Main Northern and North Coast lines. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.

Hexham railway station, New South Wales

Hexham railway station is located on the Main Northern line in New South Wales, Australia. It serves Hexham in the western Newcastle suburb of Hexham, opening on 1 August 1871.

Thornton railway station, New South Wales

Thornton railway station is located on the Main Northern line in New South Wales, Australia. It serves Thornton in the eastern suburbs of Maitland opening in 1913.

Tarro, New South Wales Suburb of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia

Tarro is a north-western suburb of the Newcastle City Council local government area in the Hunter Region of New South Wales, Australia. It, and parts of nearby Beresfield, was originally known as Upper Hexham, "lower" Hexham being an older settlement located about 5 kilometres (3 mi) to the east on the Hunter River. The name "Tarro" reportedly means "stone" in an Aboriginal language.

Ipswich Road, Brisbane road in Brisbane

Ipswich Road is one Brisbane's main roads connecting Brisbane to the nearby city of Ipswich, via the Ipswich Motorway. Ipswich Road used to be part of the Cunningham Highway. Logan Road, Pacific Motorway, and Beaudesert Road are the other major roads in the south of Brisbane. The road was an important transport route in 19th century Brisbane.

Highway 1 (New South Wales) road route in New South Wales

In New South Wales, Highway 1 is a 1,351-kilometre (839 mi) long route that crosses the state, from the Queensland/New South Wales border near Tweed Heads to the Victorian border near Timbillica. It provides the main coastal route between Brisbane and Melbourne via Sydney. Highway 1 continues around the rest of Australia, joining all mainland state capitals, and connecting major centres in Tasmania.

Wallangarra railway station

Wallangarra railway station is a heritage-listed railway station at Woodlawn Street, Wallangarra, Southern Downs Region, Queensland, Australia. It was built in 1877 along the state border of Queensland and New South Wales It was added to the Queensland Heritage Register on 28 March 2003.

Australia's Country Way is an Australian road route from Rockhampton to Wallangarra in Queensland and then to Sydney, New South Wales. Using Australia's Country Way, it is 1615 km from Rockhampton to Sydney, requiring approx 20 hours of driving. It has been designated by the Queensland Government as a State Strategic Touring Route.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "1 New England Highway, Yarraman QLD 4614 to 187 Maitland Road, Hexham NSW 2322". Google Maps . Google Inc. 2016. Retrieved 28 October 2016.
  2. 1 2 3 Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics (BITRE) (2016). Traffic on the national road network, 2013–14, Information Sheet 80 (PDF). Canberra: Commonwealth of Australia. Archived (PDF) from the original on 29 March 2019. Retrieved 24 January 2019.
  3. "More Snow Pics: Because you can never have enough". The Armidale Express. 17 July 2015.
  4. "Snow turns to ice closing highway". Guyra Argus. 9 August 2012.
  5. "Current locations - New fixed digital speed camera location - November 2018". Transport for New South Wales. NSW Government. Archived from the original on 31 January 2019. Retrieved 31 January 2019.
  6. "Average speed enforcement camera locations". Transport for New South Wales. NSW Government. Archived from the original on 31 January 2019. Retrieved 31 January 2019.
  7. "Average Speed Enforcement for Heavy Vehicles: Factsheet" (PDF). Transport for New South Wales. NSW Government. Archived (PDF) from the original on 31 January 2019. Retrieved 31 January 2019.
  8. Tenterfield District Historical Society (1949). Tenterfield. National Library of Australia. p. 31.
  9. "New England Highway : History and Development". Ozroads. Archived from the original on 4 March 2017. Retrieved 28 October 2016.[ self-published source ]
  10. "Daring mail robbery on the Great Northern Road". Newcastle Chronicle and Hunter River District News. National Library of Australia. 30 October 1861. p. 2. Retrieved 21 January 2019.
  11. "Highway robberies on the Great Northern Road". Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser. National Library of Australia. 22 December 1863. p. 3. Retrieved 21 January 2019.
  12. "Memories of Thunderbolt". Coffs Harbour Advocate. National Library of Australia. 10 May 1940. p. 2. Retrieved 21 January 2019.
  13. 1 2 "Main Roads Act, 1924-1927". Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (110). National Library of Australia. 17 August 1928. pp. 3814–3815. Retrieved 21 January 2019.
  14. "New England Highway". Kyogle Examiner. National Library of Australia. 14 February 1933. p. 2. Retrieved 21 January 2019.
  15. "New England Highway". Uralla Times. National Library of Australia. 23 February 1933. p. 11. Retrieved 21 January 2019.
  16. "Motoring along the New England Highway, part 1". Sydney Mail. National Library of Australia. 2 September 1936. Retrieved 24 January 2019.
  17. "Motoring along the New England Highway, part 2". Sydney Mail. National Library of Australia. 9 September 1936. Retrieved 24 January 2019.
  18. ""New England" Highway now via Warwick". Warwick Daily News. National Library of Australia. 9 November 1954. Retrieved 24 January 2019.
  19. "New England Highway: Council against change of name". Beaudesert Times. National Library of Australia. 21 May 1954. Retrieved 24 January 2019.
  20. ""New England" Highway now via Warwick". Warwick Daily News. National Library of Australia. 9 November 1954. Retrieved 24 January 2019.
  21. "New England Highway". Roads and Maritime Services. NSW Government. Archived from the original on 31 January 2019. Retrieved 31 January 2019.
  22. "Opening the bridge". Trove. 27 July 1893. Archived from the original on 21 January 2018. Retrieved 21 January 2018.