New Mexico Legislature

Last updated
The State Legislature of New Mexico

Legislatura de Nuevo México
Seal of the State Legislature of New Mexico.svg
Type
Type
Houses Senate
House of Representatives
Term limits
None
History
New session started
January 1, 2019 (2019-01-01)
Leadership
Howie Morales (D)
since January 1, 2019 (2019-01-01)
Mary Papen (D)
since January 15, 2013 (2013-01-15)
Brian Egolf (D)
since January 17, 2017 (2017-01-17)
Structure
Seats112
New Mexico Senate.svg
Senate political groups
  •   Democratic (26)
  •   Republican (16)
New Mexico House of Representatives partisanship 2019.svg
House political groups
Length of term
Senate: 4 years
House: 2 years
Salary$0/year + per diem
Senators
42
State Representatives
70
Elections
First-past-the-post
First-past-the-post
Senate last election
November 3, 2020 (2020-11-03)
House last election
November 3, 2020 (2020-11-03)
Senate next election
November 8, 2022 (2022-11-08)
House next election
November 8, 2022 (2022-11-08)
RedistrictingLegislative control
Motto
Crescit eundo
Meeting place
NewMexicoCapitol SantaFe.jpg
State Capitol, Santa Fe
Website
nmlegis.gov
Constitution
Constitution of New Mexico

The New Mexico Legislature (Spanish : Legislatura de Nuevo México) is the legislative branch of the state government of New Mexico. It is a bicameral body made up of the New Mexico House of Representatives and the New Mexico Senate.

Contents

History

The New Mexico Legislature was established when New Mexico officially became a state and was admitted to the union in 1912. In 1922, Bertha M. Paxton became the first woman elected to the New Mexico Legislature, serving one term in the House of Representatives. [1]

Session structure and operations

The Legislature meets in regular session on the third Tuesday in January of each odd-numbered year. The New Mexico Constitution limits the regular session to 60 calendar days, every other year it is 30 days. [2] The lieutenant governor presides over the Senate, while the Speaker of the House is elected from that body in a closed door majority member caucus. Both have wide latitude in choosing committee membership in their respective houses and have a large impact on lawmaking in the state.

While only the Governor can call the Legislature into special sessions, the Legislature can call itself into an extraordinary session. The Governor may call as many sessions as he or she wishes. The New Mexico Constitution does not limit the duration of each special session; lawmakers may consider only those issues designated by the Governor in his or her "call," or proclamation convening the special session (though other issues may be added by the Governor during a session). [3]

Any bill passed by the Legislature and signed by the Governor takes effect 90 days after its passage unless two-thirds of each house votes to give the bill immediate effect, earlier effect (before 90 day period), or later effect (after 90 day period).

Districting

The legislature consists of 70 representatives and 42 senators. Each member of the House represents roughly 25,980 residents of New Mexico. Each member of the Senate represents roughly 43,300 residents. Currently the Democratic Party holds a majority in both of the chambers of New Mexico Legislature, and holds the Governor's office. [4]

Redistricting

A legislative committee is assigned by the governor to meet every 10 years based on the outcome of the US Census to redistrict the boundaries of districts for the state legislature, and congressional districts. [5]

Term limits

Currently, there are no term limits for legislators. The longest current member of the legislature has served since 1972. House members are elected every 2 years, while Senate members are elected every 4 years. [6]

Party summary

State Senate

  26 Democrats
  16 Republicans
AffiliationParty
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Republican Vacant
End of previous legislature2715420
Jan 1, 2015 - Mar 14, 20152517420
Mar 14, 2015 - Apr 5, 20152417411
Apr 5, 2015 – Jan 17, 20172418420
Jan 17, 2017 – Present2616420

House of Representatives

  47 Democrats
  23 Republicans
AffiliationParty
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Ind Republican Vacant
51st legislature38032700
52nd legislature33037700
53rd legislature38032700
54th legislature46024700

History

SessionYearsHouseSenateGovernor
TotalDemocratsRepublicansOthersTotalDemocratsRepublicansOthers
1st1912–19144916303247161 William W. McDonald
2nd1915-19164914332247161
3rd1917-1918491930-241014- Ezequiel Cabeza De Baca
Washington E. Lindsey
4th1919-1920491534-24915- Octaviano Larrazolo
5th1921-1922491534-24915- Merritt C. Mechem
6th1923-1924493316-24915- James F. Hinkle
7th1925-1926492821-241113- Arthur T. Hannett
8th1927-1928491831-241113- Richard C. Dillon
9th1929-1930491237-24618
10th1931-1932492821-24816- Arthur Seligman
11th1933-193449418-24204-
427- Andrew W. Hockenhull
12th1935-1936493812-24186- Clyde Tingley
13th1937-193849472-24231-
14th1939-194049427-24231- John E. Miles
15th1941-194249409-24213-
16th1943-1944493316-24213- John J. Dempsey
17th1945-1946493019-24186-
18th1947-1948493019-24186- Thomas J. Mabry
19th1949-1950493613-24195-
SessionYearsHouseSenateGovernor
TotalDemocratsRepublicansOthersTotalDemocratsRepublicansOthers
20th1951-195255469-24186- Edwin L. Mechem
21st1953-1954552728-31229-
22nd1955-195655514-32239- John F. Simms
23rd1957-1958664323-32248- Edwin L. Mechem
24th1959-196066606-32248- John Burroughs
25th1961-196266597-32284- Edwin L. Mechem
Tom Bolack
26th1963-1964665511-32284- Jack M. Campbell
27th1965-1966775918-32284-
28th1967-1968704525-422517- David F. Cargo
29th1969-1970704426-422517-
30th1971-1972704822-422814- Bruce King
31st1973-1974705119-423012-
5020-
32nd1975-1976705119-422913- Jerry Apodaca
3012-
33rd1977-1978704822-42339-
34th1979-1980704129 [7] -42339- Bruce King
3210-
35th1981-1982704129 [8] -422220-
2319-
36th1983-1984704624-422319- Toney Anaya
4723-
37th1985-1986704327 [9] -422121 [10] -
2022-
4220 [11] 22
38th1987-1988704723-4221 [12] 21- Garrey Carruthers
4624-422121 [13]
39th1989-1990704525-422616-
2517-
SessionYearsHouseSenateGovernor
TotalDemocratsRepublicansOthersTotalDemocratsRepublicansOthers
40th1991-1992704921-422616- Bruce King
41st1993-1994705317-422715-
42nd1995-1996704624-422715- Gary Johnson
43rd1997-1998704228-422517-
44th1999-2000704030-422517-
45th2001-2002704228-422418 [14] -
46th2003-2004704327-422418- Bill Richardson
47th2005-2006704228-422418-
48th2007-2008704228-422418-
49th2009-2010704525-422715 [15] -
50th2011-20127036331422715 [15] - Susana Martinez
51st2013-2014703832-422517-
52nd2015-2016703337-422418-
53rd2017-2018703832-422616-
54th2019-2020704624-422616 Michelle Lujan Grisham
SessionYearsTotalDemocratsRepublicansOthersTotalDemocratsRepublicansOthersGovernor
HouseSenate

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References

  1. Eisenstadt, Pauline; Belshaw, Jim (2012). A Woman in Both Houses: My Career in New Mexico Politics. University of New Mexico Press. ISBN   9780826350244.
  2. "SESSION DATES" (PDF). Nmlegis.gov. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2019-06-15. Retrieved 2016-02-23.
  3. "New Mexico Statutes". Archived from the original on May 5, 2012. Retrieved June 12, 2012.
  4. "Political Composition". New Mexico Legislature.
  5. "New Mexico Legislative Redistricting". Nmlegis.gov. 2002-12-21. Retrieved 2016-02-23.
  6. "LEGISLATIVE TERM LIMITS AND FULL-TIME AND PART-TIME LEGISLATURES" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on December 25, 2010. Retrieved June 12, 2012.
  7. Coalition of 11 Democrats and 29 Republicans controlled the House Majority
  8. Coalition of 10 Democrats and 27 Republicans controlled the House Majority
  9. Coalition of 10 Democrats and 26 Republicans controlled the House Majority
  10. Coalition of 4 Democrats and 21 Republicans controlled the Senate Majority until one of the Democrats switched parties in late 1985, giving the Republicans outright control
  11. Coalition of 4 Republicans and 19 Democrats controlled the Senate Majority in the 37th Session's special legislative session in September 1986.
  12. Coalition of 3 Republicans and 21 Democrats controlled the Senate Majority
  13. Coalition of 5 Democrats and 18 Republicans controlled the Senate Majority beginning in January 1988
  14. Coalition of 3 Democrats and 18 Republicans controlled the Senate Majority
  15. 1 2 Coalition of 8 Democrats and 15 Republicans controlled the Senate Majority