Newbottle, Northamptonshire

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Newbottle
Northamptonshire UK location map.svg
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Newbottle
Newbottle shown within Northamptonshire
Population438 (2001 census) [1]
528 (2011 census)
OS grid reference SP523369
Civil parish
  • Newbottle
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town Banbury
Postcode district OX17
Dialling code 01295
Police Northamptonshire
Fire Northamptonshire
Ambulance East Midlands
EU Parliament East Midlands
UK Parliament
Website Welcome to the Charlton-cum-Newbottle Website!
List of places
UK
England
Northamptonshire
52°01′41″N1°14′20″W / 52.028°N 1.239°W / 52.028; -1.239 Coordinates: 52°01′41″N1°14′20″W / 52.028°N 1.239°W / 52.028; -1.239

Newbottle is a civil parish and largely deserted village in South Northamptonshire, about 4 miles (6.4 km) west of the market town of Brackley. It is close to the Oxfordshire county boundary and about 4.5 miles (7.2 km) south-east of the town of Banbury.

South Northamptonshire District in England

South Northamptonshire is a district in Northamptonshire, England. Its council is based in the town of Towcester, first established as a settlement in Roman Britain. The population of the Local Authority District Council in 2011 was 85,189.

Market town legal term for European settlement that has the right to host markets

Market town or market right is a legal term, originating in the Middle Ages, for a European settlement that has the right to host markets, distinguishing it from a village and city. On the European continent, a town may be correctly described as a "market town" or as having "market rights", even if it no longer holds a market, provided the legal right to do so still exists.

Brackley town in Northamptonshire, England

Brackley is a town in Northamptonshire, England, 22 miles (35 km) from Oxford and 20 miles (32 km) from Northampton. Historically a market town based on the wool and lace trade, it was built on the intersecting trade routes between London, Birmingham and the Midlands and Cambridge and Oxford. Brackley is close to Silverstone and home to the Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team.

Contents

A stream that is a tributary of the River Cherwell forms the parish boundary to the north-west. The remainder of the parish boundary mostly follows field boundaries.

River Cherwell tributary of the River Thames in central England

The River Cherwell is a major tributary of the River Thames in central England. It rises near Hellidon in Northamptonshire and flows south through Oxfordshire for 40 miles (64 km) to meet the Thames at Oxford. It adds a significant discharge to the Thames—when entering Oxford, the Thames's discharge is 17.6 m³/s, but after leaving and consuming the Cherwell it has increased to 24.8 m³/s. The river gives its name to the Cherwell local government district and Cherwell, an Oxford student newspaper.

The parish includes the larger village of Charlton, about 0.5 miles (800 m) southeast of Newbottle. The 2001 census recorded a parish population of 438, most of whom live in Charlton. [1] increasing to a joint population of 528 at the 2011 census. [2]

Charlton, Northamptonshire village in United Kingdom

Charlton is a village in the parish of Newbottle, Northamptonshire, England in between Brackley and Kings Sutton, lying close to a small tributary of the River Cherwell. It is a small village with a population about 200. At the 2011 census the population was included in the civil parish of Newbottle.

Archaeology

Rainsborough Camp is an early Iron Age hill fort in the southernmost part of the parish. Excavations in 1961–65 found that it had been inhabited and developed in phases between the 4th century BC and about 4 AD. [3]

Rainsborough Camp

Rainsborough Camp is an Iron Age hillfort in South Northamptonshire, England, between the villages of Croughton, Aynho, and Charlton.

The British Iron Age is a conventional name used in the archaeology of Great Britain, referring to the prehistoric and protohistoric phases of the Iron Age culture of the main island and the smaller islands, typically excluding prehistoric Ireland, which had an independent Iron Age culture of its own. The parallel phase of Irish archaeology is termed the Irish Iron Age. The Iron Age is not an archaeological horizon of common artefacts, but is rather a locally diverse cultural phase.

Hillforts in Britain

Hillforts in Britain refers to the various hillforts within the island of Great Britain. Although the earliest such constructs fitting this description come from the Neolithic British Isles, with a few also dating to later Bronze Age Britain, British hillforts were primarily constructed during the British Iron Age. Some of these were apparently abandoned in the southern areas that were a part of Roman Britain, although at the same time, those areas of northern Britain that remained free from Roman occupation saw an increase in their construction. Some hillforts were reused in the Early Middle Ages, and in some rarer cases, into the Later Medieval period as well. By the early modern period, these had essentially all been abandoned, with many being excavated by archaeologists in the nineteenth century onward.

Manor

Newbottle manor house is 16th century, built probably in the reign of Henry VIII [3] possibly by Peter Dormer, a member of the famous Buckinghamshire family, who held "Nubottel" at about that time when his daughter Elizabeth married the owner of Salford Hall, Salford Abbots. [4] The west wing was added in the 17th century and the library has panelling dating from about 1730. [3] The house has also an octagonal dovecote. [3]

Manor house country house that historically formed the administrative centre of a manor

A manor house was historically the main residence of the lord of the manor. The house formed the administrative centre of a manor in the European feudal system; within its great hall were held the lord's manorial courts, communal meals with manorial tenants and great banquets. The term is today loosely applied to various country houses, frequently dating from the late medieval era, which formerly housed the gentry.

Henry VIII of England 16th-century King of England

Henry VIII was King of England from 1509 until his death in 1547. Henry was the second Tudor monarch, succeeding his father, Henry VII. Henry is best known for his six marriages, in particular his efforts to have his first marriage, to Catherine of Aragon, annulled. His disagreement with the Pope on the question of such an annulment led Henry to initiate the English Reformation, separating the Church of England from papal authority. He appointed himself the Supreme Head of the Church of England and dissolved convents and monasteries, for which he was excommunicated. Henry is also known as "the father of the Royal Navy"; he invested heavily in the Navy, increasing its size greatly from a few to more than 50 ships.

Parish church

The Church of England parish church of Saint James has a tower built in about 1290-1210 [5] and a Norman font. The present chancel is 13th century. [6] Between the nave and north aisle is a four-bay Decorated Gothic arcade. [3] The south aisle is a Perpendicular Gothic arcade addition. [6] The Gothic Revival east window in the chancel was inserted in 1865 [6] and its stained glass is by C.E. Kempe. [3]

Church of England parish church church which acts as the religious centre for the people within the smallest and most basic Church of England administrative region

A parish church in the Church of England is the church which acts as the religious centre for the people within the smallest and most basic Church of England administrative region, the parish – since the 19th century called the ecclesiastical parish to avoid confusion with the civil parish which many towns and villages have.

Norman architecture sub-type of Romanesque architecture

The term Norman architecture is used to categorise styles of Romanesque architecture developed by the Normans in the various lands under their dominion or influence in the 11th and 12th centuries. In particular the term is traditionally used for English Romanesque architecture. The Normans introduced large numbers of castles and fortifications including Norman keeps, and at the same time monasteries, abbeys, churches and cathedrals, in a style characterised by the usual Romanesque rounded arches and especially massive proportions compared to other regional variations of the style.

Baptismal font article of church furniture intended for infant baptism

A baptismal font is an article of church furniture used for baptism.

In the Middle Ages St. James' belonged to the Augustinian Dunstable Priory. [7] The Priory's annals for 1291 record it as receiving tithes from Newbottle. [7] It still possessed St. James' in 1535 when the Crown's bailiff valued the Priory's property and estates in preparation for the Dissolution of the Monasteries. [7]

St. James' now forms a single benefice with SS Peter and Paul, King's Sutton. [8]

Related Research Articles

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Silverstone village in Northamptonshire, England, UK

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References

  1. 1 2 "Area selected: South Northamptonshire (Non-Metropolitan District)". Neighbourhood Statistics: Full Dataset View. Office for National Statistics . Retrieved 14 November 2009.
  2. "Civil Parish population 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 30 June 2016.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Pevsner & Cherry, 1973, page 312
  4. Phillimore, W.P.W., M.A., editor, The Visitation of Worcestershire 1569,London, 1888, p.8.
  5. Pevsner & Cherry, 1973, page 311-312
  6. 1 2 3 Pevsner & Cherry, 1973, page 311
  7. 1 2 3 Victoria County History , 1904, pages 371–377
  8. Archbishops' Council (2010). "St James, Newbottle w Charlton". A Church Near You. Church of England . Retrieved 25 March 2011.

Further reading

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Newbottle, Northamptonshire at Wikimedia Commons