Newfoundland pound

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The pound was the currency of Newfoundland until 1865. It was subdivided into 20 shillings , each of 12 pence . The Newfoundland pound was equal to sterling and sterling coin circulated, supplemented by locally produced tokens and banknotes. In 1865, the dollar was introduced at a rate of 1 dollar = 4s.2d., or 1 dollar = 50d.

Contents

Tokens

Tokens were privately produced for 1 farthing in 1829, and ½d in 1841, 1846 and 1860.

Banknotes

In 1854, the Union Bank of Newfoundland introduced £1 notes. The same denomination was issued by the Commercial Bank of Newfoundland from 1857. Both banks continued to issue notes denominated in £sd after the introduction of the dollar, although they did issue dollar notes in the 1880s.

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